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Old 12-20-2017, 01:11 PM
 
59 posts, read 57,983 times
Reputation: 40

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocean900 View Post
Realtors will never tell the truth no matter how "nice" they seem. I've rented 4 places in Boston, the best thing you can do is simply ring the doorbell and, as politely as possible, ask the tenant(s) of their opinion on the building. Yes, many will not answer the door or tell you off nicely, but you would be surprised at how many will be truthful and helpful. Bring a friend to cheer you on and stand in background

I had a woman tell me about a basketball court in the back that I didn't notice and another lady told me they had a roach and rat infestation that the landlord does nothing about... constant mold problems in common areas, etc... you just never know.

If I were planning to buy a condo I would write a short and sweet letter with a self addressed prepaid envelope.
I know.... you're right. I should have spoken to the other tenants, but I didn't get the chance. The realtor definitely lied to me. She went on and on about how amazing and wonderful the building and landlords are, but then again, of course she did, because they're paying her to find tenants. Lesson learned. I believe you about the roach and rat infestations.. There are a lot of "slumlords" in the Boston area, I've learned.. My last landlord was one of those. He didn't care about his properties, never cleaned or maintained them, and just continued to collect rent checks. He's a millionaire, too.

Thanks for your tips. I will definitely speak to the other tenants in the future. I guess I was also wondering about how to determine if the building construction is fairly soundproof.. Too bad they won't let you temporarily live in an apartment for a day or two!
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Old 12-20-2017, 01:18 PM
 
33 posts, read 12,836 times
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Of course it's no guarantee, but when making such a huge commitment it's worth a try. And yes, you are right, the response might be vague or not wholly truthful, but it doesn't have to be disparaging to be helpful when making a choice.
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Old 12-20-2017, 02:09 PM
 
5,221 posts, read 5,044,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cutea View Post
what she's cooking for dinner, and any other noises that come about.
You can hear what she's cooking? Man, those must be some thin walls!
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Old 12-20-2017, 07:59 PM
 
Location: New York
1,532 posts, read 1,485,876 times
Reputation: 1846
Rent a house. There is no such thing as a quiet apartment.
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Old 12-20-2017, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Quincy, Mass. (near Boston)
2,114 posts, read 3,549,266 times
Reputation: 1657
Even that modern, fancy 2 Hancock Street in Quincy, called Hancock Landing, adjacent to the red line has...noise from the subway (!), I've heard from someone

Can't win.

I have a top-floor efficiency in Quincy, in order to finally escape noise from above neighbors. Guess what? I've had two neighbors below over the years, both smokers, coughing and clearing their throats. Yuck. Plus their music and tv noise still wafts above to me!... now is that too picky or would most here not appreciate tv or music from below? Even with my radio on and the ac or fan on, I can detect his music, video games or tv. That wouldn't bother some, perhaps? Be grateful as long as I don't hear their footsteps or pots and pans slamming about? But admittedly, I am unreasonably noise sensitive with severe OCD about certain noises (only surfacing in my late 20s years ago..and I am a bit nutty about any noise or thumping motion.)

My first studio, on Beacon Hill in 1983, a crappy old building on Grove Street near Harvard Gardens restaurant, had red line trains and rumbling sound below for 19 hours daily! That shocked me but shouldn't have.... it's just I didn't think of asking, and the realtor needn't disclose it.

Same as a mid-floor studio in an old building on charming St. Botolph Street in the 80s. I could hear doors closing like in most places, plus pots and pans and feet stomping above. I wrote her a note complaining about it, and she wrote me a note telling me it's life in the city and to get used to it.

Townhouses seem better, as my mom had one for years, and with three levels, and neighbors on both sides, she really didn't hear anything in a likely cheaply constructed place...just the neighbor sometimes playing piano.

I hear the faucets running of one of my neighbors, but thankfully no toilets, as I usually have on the fan, ac or radio or tv. No cupboards slamming, either.

Even in a Brookline home I rented a room in years ago, I'd hear parties in the apt. behind but only a few times a year...but that barking dog next door was a pain. In other words, there's always something to tick off most of us.
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Old 12-21-2017, 08:56 AM
 
1,743 posts, read 3,292,091 times
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There are newer, larger buildings in Quincy that aren't just two-family frame houses which may have sound dampening materials in the walls and between floors. But before moving again I would try insulating measures in the apartment you're in now. As you say the neighbor isn't doing anything unusual-- cooking, talking on the phone, watching TV--and those sounds can be attenuated a lot by furnishing your apt. First thing to try is sound-absorbing rugs or carpet. You also want things like books along the walls and fabrics that cut the resonance of wood-frame/ hardwood floor construction.
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Old 12-21-2017, 11:51 AM
 
59 posts, read 57,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missionhill View Post
There are newer, larger buildings in Quincy that aren't just two-family frame houses which may have sound dampening materials in the walls and between floors. But before moving again I would try insulating measures in the apartment you're in now. As you say the neighbor isn't doing anything unusual-- cooking, talking on the phone, watching TV--and those sounds can be attenuated a lot by furnishing your apt. First thing to try is sound-absorbing rugs or carpet. You also want things like books along the walls and fabrics that cut the resonance of wood-frame/ hardwood floor construction.
Agreed. I am going to try sound dampening measures, definitely.. At the very least, I paid for the rest of December and January, so I have to stay for a couple of months. I figured putting down a thick pad with a carpet in the bedroom might help dampen the sounds from below. I forgot to mention that my neighbor also has very loud sex, multiple times per day.... Fans and earplugs can only do so much!
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Old 12-21-2017, 11:56 AM
 
59 posts, read 57,983 times
Reputation: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by reenzz View Post
Rent a house. There is no such thing as a quiet apartment.
I understand your sentiment. However, I've lived in apartments with more tolerable levels of noise-or very mild noise: (e.g., cabinets closing, people walking in the hallways, train going by, etc.).. But my current apartment has paper thin floors/ceilings/walls, which is a fault of the construction.. I've made this mistake twice, which is why I posted here for tips on how to select a quiet-ER apartment in the future.. I have realistic expectations of apartment noise, but hearing someone's entire phone conversation and sex talk is a bit much!!!!!!!! I stupidly keep picking these wood frame, hardwood floor places with no sound insulation.. But, most of the apartments that I see listed online are this type!
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Old 12-21-2017, 12:23 PM
 
297 posts, read 164,043 times
Reputation: 390
Older apartments are often quieter - plaster and lathe walls and ceilings provide a lot more sound deadening than the cheap drywall that is used in all new renos.
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Old 12-21-2017, 10:38 PM
 
240 posts, read 301,657 times
Reputation: 348
I totally understand you situation.

I'm not in the construction trade, so I will do my best to describe it
and leave it to others more knowledgeable to contribute.

What you should seek out is a condo for rent in a multistory building
that is constructed from aluminum and concrete.

A friend of mine lives in one in Quincy (he owns) but I can't imagine
such units not being for rent. In such a unit, one hears nothing from
the neighboring units above, below, and to the sides.

I know it's a weird question "how is the building constructed?" when
touring apartments for rent.

Hope this is helpful.
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