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Old 01-05-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
1,640 posts, read 743,232 times
Reputation: 1413

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
This is a key difference between Boston and Chicago. It is extremely easy to figure out how to get around in Chicago because it is a grid city. There is no grid whatsoever in Boston -- the streets are like plates of spaghetti. The numbering is NOT consistent, so don't think that 800 on one block will be 800 on the next.

Also, the city of Chicago is much larger than the city of Boston, so parts of the Boston area that are different towns would still be in the the city of Chicago if you are looking at comparable distances from the city centers. Yes, so many of the suburbs really are like extensions of the city. I've lived in both Skokie and Forest Park, and both are quite urban. I also lived in Palatine, and while it and Arlington Heights do have a different feel, even they have a bit more of a city feel than a lot of the suburbs in Boston. I also worked in Mt. Prospect, Wheaton and Darien. I'd say Darien was the most suburban of the bunch. As the county seat of DuPage County, Wheaton has a lot going on, even though in some ways, it can be prototypically suburban. I do have to say, that the suburbs of Boston are nicer and prettier than the suburbs of Chicago. It's actually quite difficult to come up with too many suburbs in each metro area that are truly comparable to each other.

Good luck with your move. I hope that living by the ocean suits you and that the extra commute is worth it. And since you're renting, you'll have a better sense of what you want if you decide after that first year that you want to move closer to work.
I too lived in AH- All good points here. I lived in Glenview as well, so I'm overly familiar with Skokie and Niles. I would say that the Chicago suburbs are quite a bit more expensive, and even as far out as AH/Naperville, they're more urban than the towns with similar proximity to Boston (if you exclude the Lowells of MA). As for inner ring burbs in Chicagoland, they are generally more like a Medford or Waltham as far as density and urbanality. Evanston is the exception, though.

So, I do agree that the immediate, inner ring suburbs of Chicago are fairly urban, especially compared to the rest of the country. They're also more expansive to be certain. That said, they're not urban like Boston's inner ring suburbs to the north and west. Cambridge-Brookline-Somerville-Malden are significantly more dense than Skokie-Niles-Oak Park and the like.

Anyways, totally agree. I do love Chicago's North Shore communities.. I mean, who wouldnt! And the La Grange-WS-Hinsdale area is quite nice too. But I do prefer Boston's suburbs to Chicago's, especially once you get to the Lake Zurich's and the Buffalo Groves. I'd trade our outer ring suburbs in a heartbeat.
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Old 01-05-2018, 10:06 AM
 
7,335 posts, read 8,992,961 times
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Skokie and Niles are a bit more suburban in feel than places like Malden, Medford and Quincy, without a doubt. And outside of the Marina Bay, Quincy is quite ordinary--really nothing special at all..

The Allston-Brighton area of Boston is full of BU/BC students, and really wouldn't appeal very much to an older couple..

Evanston is kind of a gold standard ---very appealing, with both highly-regarded Northwestern University and Lake Michigan on its doorstep. Cambridge might be something of an equivalent, because of Harvard ( and a lesser extent MIT), but it's pretty urban ( but pleasant), and very expensive...
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Old 01-05-2018, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
1,640 posts, read 743,232 times
Reputation: 1413
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
I would say that the Chicago suburbs are quite a bit more expensive, and even as far out as AH/Naperville, they're more urban than the towns with similar proximity to Boston (if you exclude the Lowells of MA).
*Expansive
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Old 01-05-2018, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
1,640 posts, read 743,232 times
Reputation: 1413
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
Skokie and Niles are a bit more suburban in feel than places like Malden, Medford and Quincy, without a doubt. And outside of the Marina Bay, Quincy is quite ordinary--really nothing special at all..

The Allston-Brighton area of Boston is full of BU/BC students, and really wouldn't appeal very much to an older couple..

Evanston is kind of a gold standard ---very appealing, with both highly-regarded Northwestern University and Lake Michigan on its doorstep. Cambridge might be something of an equivalent, because of Harvard ( and a lesser extent MIT), but it's pretty urban ( but pleasant), and very expensive...
Agree. Brookline/Cambridge are the Evanston equivalent in theory, but Cambridge/Somerville are more like a wicker park/bucktown/lakeview depending on the area.
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Old 01-06-2018, 09:46 AM
 
Location: East Coast
2,772 posts, read 1,578,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
Agree. Brookline/Cambridge are the Evanston equivalent in theory, but Cambridge/Somerville are more like a wicker park/bucktown/lakeview depending on the area.
I think Newton and Brookline are more equivalent to Evanston than is Cambridge. Cambridge is really, really urbanized like a large city, with SO many high-rises and corporate HQs or offices. I don't think Evanston is that similar to Cambridge.

In some ways, Boston and Cambridge can be thought of as one city -- I have heard people talk about moving to places like Newton or Needham from Cambridge and refer to it as 'moving from the city.'
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Old 01-06-2018, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Chicago
27 posts, read 13,644 times
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Well, thanks folks. I am landing in Logan this Wednesday noon and renting a car. I am going to head straight to appointments in Cohasset and Hull and then to Weymouth. I have Quincy for Thursday afternoon and hopefully Friday all day.
Since I will be in Quincy late Wednesday night do you guys have a suggestion for a restaurant to have a dinner. After I will go to hotel in Boston.
Interesting to me was the reaction of realtors to my needs. I realise they are working for that fee. Some just talked about one unit I was interested in and some offered other options. One guy offered to drive us around.
I haven't looked for the place to live in a long time and I wonder, how important are the move-in dates? I get it, units go fast and what I may be looking at Wednesday will not be there February 1st. Do they or owner care who is applying for rent or renting it asap prevails? Is it unusual to give a good renter a flexibility in time? Then again there is a lot of competition in available units and price.
I am looking at few units along Quincy Shore Dr. and near North Quincy T stop.
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Old 01-06-2018, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Chicago
27 posts, read 13,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
Quincy is a bit of a mixed bag, but Quincy's waterfront is expansive and nice. A lot of building and gentrification in that area. If it were me, I'd go a more urban waterfront environment like Quincy, or a pretty and scenic waterfront town like Hingham. I'm not a big Weymouth fan- Apologies in advance to the folks from Weymouth

To the north, Marblehead is about as scenic and charming as it gets. You'd be reliant on the Swampscott train, though, so that may mean a drive. Explore Marblehead/Swampscott and Quincy/Hingham. Those are the only logical seaside towns to recommend to keep your commute time down.
Thanks for the info. There was nothing listed in Zillow for Hingham. I am leaning towards North Quincy.
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Old 01-06-2018, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Chicago
27 posts, read 13,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
This is a key difference between Boston and Chicago. It is extremely easy to figure out how to get around in Chicago because it is a grid city. There is no grid whatsoever in Boston -- the streets are like plates of spaghetti. The numbering is NOT consistent, so don't think that 800 on one block will be 800 on the next.
Lol. This is going to give me problems in my work. Based on what I have seen for rent or sale I am hoping to have a lot of urban kitchens, small and efficient. Which means a lot of running around of city neighborhoods.
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Old 01-06-2018, 04:53 PM
 
785 posts, read 1,086,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schtuka View Post
Yep, beauty of this is that I am well set for the next year no matter what even if I have to carry my mortgage for couple of months. Should be enough of time to figure my job future and where to live. I have set up showings in Cohasset, Weymouth and Hull for Wednesday. I figured I start way south so by the time I have to leave for airport I am somewhere in North Quincy or city. Overall everything I found in these towns have parking for 1 or 2 cars, laundry in unit or building and not as small and dingy as similar cost in the city. Yes, I am probably done with urban life. See, before I joined my company I worked in Old Town Chicago for 16 years. Last 3 years I spent driving to Oak Brook from Rogers Park and I kind of liked it. I got to know all those nice towns like Hinsdale and Burr Ridge and have met ton of people. I wasn't ready to move to suburbs just because of how inexpensive my condo living was compare to horrendous taxes in suburbs.
Living in the west suburban area of Chicago you mentioned, being familiar with Rogers Park and very familiar with Boston and its enviorns, I would say the best way of life and easy living with nice homes and townhomes would be in the West Suburbs of Chicago. Having lived in all three areas ( I used to live on the north side of Chicago as well) this would be a no brainer for me. You don't have to live in Hinsdale or Burr Ridge, some of the wealthiest towns in the country, to live int the suburbs and to avoid paying high taxes.

That being said, you sound like you want, or need, a change after 26 years. This need seems to drive your desire to live in Boston. Boston has many fine attributes such as the ocean, seafood, a vibrant economy, and things to do within a small radius; it also is tough to live in, has a high COL, and in my opinion worse winters that Chicago when you factor in the amount of snow and nor'easterns. Change is good in many cases, ask the Pilgrims who landed in Mass. for a better life.
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Old 01-07-2018, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Chicago
27 posts, read 13,644 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justabystander View Post
Living in the west suburban area of Chicago you mentioned, being familiar with Rogers Park and very familiar with Boston and its enviorns, I would say the best way of life and easy living with nice homes and townhomes would be in the West Suburbs of Chicago. Having lived in all three areas ( I used to live on the north side of Chicago as well) this would be a no brainer for me. You don't have to live in Hinsdale or Burr Ridge, some of the wealthiest towns in the country, to live int the suburbs and to avoid paying high taxes.

That being said, you sound like you want, or need, a change after 26 years. This need seems to drive your desire to live in Boston. Boston has many fine attributes such as the ocean, seafood, a vibrant economy, and things to do within a small radius; it also is tough to live in, has a high COL, and in my opinion worse winters that Chicago when you factor in the amount of snow and nor'easterns. Change is good in many cases, ask the Pilgrims who landed in Mass. for a better life.
Thank you for reply.There is certainly a difference between Northshore and West Suburbs as far as people and way of life. I worked in Oak Brook for 3.5 years and before that for 16 years in Chicago Old Town. There is a difference between clients from Hinsdale/Burr Ridge and from Winnetka/Glencoe for sure. More satisfied customers from West suburbs than from North. Is there such a difference in Boston suburbs?
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