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Old 02-08-2018, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,852 posts, read 6,805,356 times
Reputation: 6573

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Quote:
Originally Posted by millerm277 View Post



The Silver Line extension is going to make it a lot more attractive, and as you note it's already growing/improving.

I've never met anyone who moved to be close to the Silver line.
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Old 02-08-2018, 10:20 PM
 
Location: New England
1,923 posts, read 1,067,550 times
Reputation: 1682
The biggest downside to the new silver line extension is that it'll still get stuck in Ted Williams traffic.
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Old 02-08-2018, 10:30 PM
 
6,117 posts, read 3,055,610 times
Reputation: 9566
I don't study Boston in depth. There is a movement to bump up the modern feel % of the overall city. Boston's roots will never be covered up, but cities like Seattle have shown what moving forward (future) can do for its economy. We have a great reputation for medical and college. It's easy to see the draw to grow Boston. I'm still not sure if the population will grow much beyond 750k. Much of the growth is places of business, not residential that counts towards population. At least that's how I see it from the burbs.
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Old 02-08-2018, 11:50 PM
 
1,097 posts, read 1,404,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
I've never met anyone who moved to be close to the Silver line.
There's plenty of people and development that's followed the Silver Line, the entire Seaport area.

I'm not claiming Chelsea is going to see anything like that. But it is going to suddenly have significantly better transit connectivity and a much faster commute than it currently has to many areas.

It's already been improving and seeing development and now it's made more attractive. The logical conclusion would be that it's going to then see even more of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tysmith95 View Post
The biggest downside to the new silver line extension is that it'll still get stuck in Ted Williams traffic.
True, but it's still better, and transferring at Airport is a pretty attractive option as well. Then your bus only makes a handful of stops and is almost entirely separated from traffic, and you can switch to the Blue Line.
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Old 02-09-2018, 05:28 AM
 
1,068 posts, read 431,083 times
Reputation: 1319
It still blows my mind how transportation is not #1 on anyone running for any office in Boston's action list.
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Old 02-09-2018, 08:40 AM
 
Location: New England
1,923 posts, read 1,067,550 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by millerm277 View Post
True, but it's still better, and transferring at Airport is a pretty attractive option as well. Then your bus only makes a handful of stops and is almost entirely separated from traffic, and you can switch to the Blue Line.
True, although I'm not sure that'll be faster then the 111 bus if you're going downtown.
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Old 02-09-2018, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Boston
7,336 posts, read 15,298,585 times
Reputation: 8612
Quote:
Originally Posted by millerm277 View Post
There's plenty of people and development that's followed the Silver Line, the entire Seaport area.
Not really. The Silver Line was more a response to growth and increased demand in the Seaport rather than the other way around. The Seaport didn't develop because of the Silver Line - it developed because of the vast amount of vacant land, on the waterfront, right next to downtown. The Silver Line came in to fill the transit void for much of that area. It's done a mediocre job.

Quote:
True, but it's still better, and transferring at Airport is a pretty attractive option as well. Then your bus only makes a handful of stops and is almost entirely separated from traffic, and you can switch to the Blue Line.
The Silver Line extension in Chelsea is definitely big. I think that many people don't realize that it has it's own right of way for most of the route so it's going to be far more efficient than driving or even the 111 bus (which is a crowded nightmare anyway). It's true bus rapid transit and I think it'll be helpful for Chelsea, but I don't think it'll be THE catalyst for major change.

I would like to see the Silverline converted to at least light rail (the tunnels and bridges were designed to accommodate this eventually). That'll be better for development. Buses, no matter how efficient, don't drive development like fixed rail.
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Old 02-09-2018, 03:22 PM
 
Location: New England
1,923 posts, read 1,067,550 times
Reputation: 1682
When the silver line opened in 2004 most of the seaport was still parking lots.

It's only in the last few years that the area has really blossomed.

Anyway I think the seaport has blossomed because of its proximity to downtown. I don't think the silver line has anything to do with it. In fact the silver line sucks in it's current form. Busses in the tunnel can't go any faster then 10 mph. Then it has to make a weird loop to get from the silver line tunnel to the airport.
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Old 02-09-2018, 05:43 PM
 
Location: orl2bos2upstateny
233 posts, read 99,756 times
Reputation: 186
Any thoughts about this Indigo Line... or West Station??
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Old 02-09-2018, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Boston
90 posts, read 76,857 times
Reputation: 167
Default It depends if future Bostonians come to love high rises or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by metalmancpa View Post
I don't study Boston in depth. There is a movement to bump up the modern feel % of the overall city. Boston's roots will never be covered up, but cities like Seattle have shown what moving forward (future) can do for its economy. We have a great reputation for medical and college. It's easy to see the draw to grow Boston. I'm still not sure if the population will grow much beyond 750k. Much of the growth is places of business, not residential that counts towards population. At least that's how I see it from the burbs.
Boston is an historically low slung city whose citizens have long been hesitant to drastically change that. Its zoning laws reflect that unease. But with strong job growth, much more housing needs to be built, and with almost zero new land to build on, infill high rises in targeted areas seems the only way to accommodate that demand. Without it, housing prices will continue to skyrocket, threatening future economic growth. Overstrict zoning laws could turn the city into another San Francisco. To date, Boston's "High Spine" strategy, which restricts high rises in central Boston to certain areas has been a success, preserving Boston's essential character. However, accommodating a larger population means finding new areas to build high rise districts. Ideally they should be built near rapid transit stations and away from long established low rise neighborhoods. Sullivan Square could be transformed into a high rise neighborhood for many thousands of people, possibly linked with Assembly Square and the new casino. Other possibilities are near JFK, Widett Circle, and the old Suffolk Downs site. The Seaport still has some land left to build on, but building heights are restricted because it's on the main flight path into the airport. That and transit problems limits how much that area can soak up future increased housing demand. New neighborhoods have to be built. Best to start planning for it now.
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