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Old 02-05-2018, 11:09 AM
 
7,015 posts, read 6,715,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tysmith95 View Post
But to be honest Quincy isin't the most urban walkable place. The city has no laws requiring people to shovel sidewalks during the winter, so pathways to the t can be difficult. Why Quincy does have the T the city has lots of strip malls and other car dependent places. Most people there have cars.
OP never stated being "walkable" as a requirement, only that restaurants and shopping are close by. He said they have a car. Saying that, parts of Quincy are "walkable". Quincy Center (which I wouldn't recommend for living, but someone who favors more "urban" might be OK there) and Wollaston Center are two examples.
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Old 02-05-2018, 11:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
OP never stated being "walkable" as a requirement, only that restaurants and shopping are close by. He said they have a car. Saying that, parts of Quincy are "walkable". Quincy Center (which I wouldn't recommend for living, but someone who favors more "urban" might be OK there) and Wollaston Center are two examples.


Yeah, well, he said they won't be using the car much and want to be in a neighborhood with restaurants, etc. That says to me and most people they are looking for walkable.
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Old 02-05-2018, 11:27 AM
 
Location: New England
1,933 posts, read 1,074,088 times
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I was thinking of something like Davis Square, where you can easily live without a car.

To be honest though those types of neighborhoods are too expensive for the OP, I can't think of one that would fit the stated price range. I was just pointing out that in Quincy you could live near the T and commute using it, but for most other things you'd probably need the car. Quincy Center might be the only exception, as there are a bunch of restaurants there. Still in my opinion Quincy feels like a suburb that happens to have a T line that goes through it and not a true urban neighborhood. It will probably work for the OP though as the OP did say that they had a car.

Malden center there are some but not a ton of restaurants and bars. Still it's affordable and could be an option for the OP.

A good option for the OP would be something near Savin Hill or JFK/Umass. Anything east of Dot Ave is pretty safe and it's a dense urban neighborhood. Plus a short hop over to South Station where they would take the silver line in.

Somewhere in East Somerville (near Sullivan) or Ten Hills (near Assembly) could work. Although the red line would be better then the orange, as it is one less transfer to the airport. To the airport from the orange would be Orange Line to State, Blue Line to airport station, then airport shuttle to whatever terminal you want. Red would be train to South Station, then the Silver Line which drops directly at the terminals.
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Old 02-05-2018, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
1,640 posts, read 743,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
Why would Quincy not be recommended when it meets all the OP's requirements???
It's safe enough. There are some restaurants and there is some shopping. You can get a $2100 1/2 bdr.

But, of all of the options that check those boxes in Greater Boston, would Quincy be your first recommendation for someone moving from out of state? Especially if they're coming from downtown Chicago? I'm of the opinion that we can collectively guide him to a neighborhood that checks all of the same boxes, with more to do and see, more 25-35 year old couples, and a better overall "feel". Quincy is totally fine, but it's not one of the few places i'd recommend up front. Certainly not a place that's going to make an overwhelming positive impression up front.

OP, Quincy would be a lot like Rodgers Park/West Ridge/Edison Park/Hyde Park.
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Old 02-05-2018, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
1,640 posts, read 743,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tysmith95 View Post
I was thinking of something like Davis Square, where you can easily live without a car.

To be honest though those types of neighborhoods are too expensive for the OP, I can't think of one that would fit the stated price range. I was just pointing out that in Quincy you could live near the T and commute using it, but for most other things you'd probably need the car. Quincy Center might be the only exception, as there are a bunch of restaurants there. Still in my opinion Quincy feels like a suburb that happens to have a T line that goes through it and not a true urban neighborhood. It will probably work for the OP though as the OP did say that they had a car.

Malden center there are some but not a ton of restaurants and bars. Still it's affordable and could be an option for the OP.

A good option for the OP would be something near Savin Hill or JFK/Umass. Anything east of Dot Ave is pretty safe and it's a dense urban neighborhood. Plus a short hop over to South Station where they would take the silver line in.

Somewhere in East Somerville (near Sullivan) or Ten Hills (near Assembly) could work. Although the red line would be better then the orange, as it is one less transfer to the airport. To the airport from the orange would be Orange Line to State, Blue Line to airport station, then airport shuttle to whatever terminal you want. Red would be train to South Station, then the Silver Line which drops directly at the terminals.
Porter/North Cambridge would work if the OP is priced out of Davis. You can most certainly find a 1 bdr in Davis at that price point, so in sticking with my prior statement, maybe the OP should elect for a short term 1 bdr in an area that sounds most appealing. Then, once they're here, investigate the cheaper areas an find a good fit for the long term.

I'd go Central personally, as I like it's central location (LOL). But, I'm not sure what kind of vibe the OP desires.. His choice neighborhoods in Chicago should lend the necessary knowledge transfer.
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Old 02-05-2018, 12:00 PM
 
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First of all thanks for the input, it's very helpful .

As far as preferred neighborhoods in Chicago , don't know if I forgot to mention it in the original post but we currently live in the Schaumburg area, and we have no problems with finding something of similar style in Boston. But we would prefer something more walkable and city like if we can find it. I know our budget doesn't exactly lend itself to many options.

As far the Chicago neighborhoods we like Evanston and Lincoln Park are definitely at the top of the list.
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Old 02-05-2018, 12:01 PM
 
Location: New England
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OP could take a look at East Boston. Parts of it are full of Hispanic immigrants, but it has been gentrifying rapidly in recent years. Plus you couldn't beat that commute. The Jeffries Point area is very nice, and I love the view of Boston from the Eastie Waterfront. Also Eastie has some great food options.
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Old 02-05-2018, 12:13 PM
 
7,015 posts, read 6,715,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tysmith95 View Post
OP could take a look at East Boston. Parts of it are full of Hispanic immigrants, but it has been gentrifying rapidly in recent years. Plus you couldn't beat that commute. The Jeffries Point area is very nice, and I love the view of Boston from the Eastie Waterfront. Also Eastie has some great food options.
East Boston is not very safe.
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Old 02-05-2018, 12:16 PM
 
Location: New England
1,933 posts, read 1,074,088 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
East Boston is not very safe.
Jefferies Point is safe. Crime occurs everywhere, and I wouldn't call East Boston particularly unsafe. It's safer then places like Roxbury, parts of Dorchester, or Mattapan. And definitively safer then large chunks of Chicago.

Last edited by tysmith95; 02-05-2018 at 12:41 PM.. Reason: competitor site
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Old 02-05-2018, 12:20 PM
 
32,770 posts, read 22,707,241 times
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Most of East Boston is perfectly fine. Been gentrifying quite a bit for a good while.
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