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Old 02-26-2018, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,862 posts, read 6,812,290 times
Reputation: 6583

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Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
Well if they're larger and have worse economies, they'll be cheaper. Or if they're not isolated due to geography they'll be cheaper.


Not sure about what places are like Boston, and having great economies like Boston (high end jobs) and aren't as expensive or moreso. Manhattan is. SF is. DC is (but there is more space there to sprawl).


Geographic area has to be taken into account. Boston has a tiny footprint comparatively.
Also, I think Urban Peasant may also think that for himself personally, he could probably get a job and do better for himself elsewhere. If you're qualified, talented, and able, you can probably get a good job elsewhere too, only not have to have roommates or whatever aspect of Boston life you don't like. I'm just saying I totally understand that. Let's say overall Chicago doesn't have as much of an economy as Boston. Maybe true, but if you think that you personally could get a job there, it matters considerably less what the rest of the outlook is.
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Old 02-26-2018, 12:04 PM
 
32,730 posts, read 22,676,881 times
Reputation: 29784
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
Also, I think Urban Peasant may also think that for himself personally, he could probably get a job and do better for himself elsewhere. If you're qualified, talented, and able, you can probably get a good job elsewhere too, only not have to have roommates or whatever aspect of Boston life you don't like. I'm just saying I totally understand that. Let's say overall Chicago doesn't have as much of an economy as Boston. Maybe true, but if you think that you personally could get a job there, it matters considerably less what the rest of the outlook is.

Well of course. That pertains to anywhere. If you can work from home like so many of my friends do, you can live like a king or queen in Ames IA, too. That isn't news.


Of course, if you're that qualified, talented and able you can probably get to the top in Boston and not worry about the downside I would have to deal with.
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Old 02-26-2018, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,862 posts, read 6,812,290 times
Reputation: 6583
Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
Well of course. That pertains to anywhere. If you can work from home like so many of my friends do, you can live like a king or queen in Ames IA, too. That isn't news.


Of course, if you're that qualified, talented and able you can probably get to the top in Boston and not worry about the downside I would have to deal with.
I don't think anyone is saying it's news. Just being a human. I'm simply expressing sympathy to the notion I understand being expressed.
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Old 02-27-2018, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
1,605 posts, read 738,738 times
Reputation: 1393
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
Also, I think Urban Peasant may also think that for himself personally, he could probably get a job and do better for himself elsewhere. If you're qualified, talented, and able, you can probably get a good job elsewhere too, only not have to have roommates or whatever aspect of Boston life you don't like. I'm just saying I totally understand that. Let's say overall Chicago doesn't have as much of an economy as Boston. Maybe true, but if you think that you personally could get a job there, it matters considerably less what the rest of the outlook is.
BUT.

Would you rather pay $500k for a house, struggle with the mortgage, but see an almost gaunrunteed increase in value outside of sweat equity? Or would you rather buy a nicer $500k house, in a local economy that's been in turmoil, where there is a fleeting ppopulation and overhaul of building? Chicago has yet to return to pre-recession values. Boston has well surpassed that threshold.

Boston has always been more expensive than Chicago. It is what it is. I like Greater Boston more, but I like Chicago as a city more. If I'm investing in a house, I know where I'm investing.
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Old 02-27-2018, 01:31 PM
 
32,730 posts, read 22,676,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
Boston has always been more expensive than Chicago. It is what it is. I like Greater Boston more, but I like Chicago as a city more. If I'm investing in a house, I know where I'm investing.
Yeah, I would pick Chicago in a heartbeat. If there were jobs. I wouldn't have left the area after grad school, but again, jobs. I kept coming back to Boston because it always has opportunities.
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Old 02-27-2018, 01:49 PM
 
Location: New England
1,925 posts, read 1,070,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
Sorry to get a bit off track but after reading posts on this thread disgustingly reminds me that Boston is more expensive than Chicago. To be more expensive than the third biggest city in the nation when we are 10th or 11th biggest is a darn shame. How on earth did we get to this point? (That's a rhetorical question btw, I already know the answers.)
There are more NIMBY's around here who refuse to allow more housing to be built.

And before someone chimes in to say that you can't build any more, I'm talking about multi-family housing not single family housing.

It's a result of the hyper local governments around here. It gives NIMBY's more of a voice. 40B helps, but it's not enough in some places.

The politics here are similar to San Francisco in that aspect. Although SF has water on three sides, so it's difficult for them to grow.
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Old 02-27-2018, 01:52 PM
 
32,730 posts, read 22,676,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tysmith95 View Post
There are more NIMBY's around here who refuse to allow more housing to be built.

And before someone chimes in to say that you can't build any more, I'm talking about multi-family housing not single family housing.

It's a result of the hyper local governments around here. It gives NIMBY's more of a voice. 40B helps, but it's not enough in some places.


So you want to tear down single family housing to build multi family? Because there is multi family being built in plenty of places, or multi unit. Lots of it.


Chicago is different because it has mostly been surrounded by ag fields. That's growth we can't have. I drove Madison to Chicago (sometimes via Milwaukee) many times year after year (still do once a year) and each year those city's suburbs sprawl further out into the corn/soy fields. That's growth Boston can't do.
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Old 02-27-2018, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
1,605 posts, read 738,738 times
Reputation: 1393
Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
Yeah, I would pick Chicago in a heartbeat. If there were jobs. I wouldn't have left the area after grad school, but again, jobs. I kept coming back to Boston because it always has opportunities.
Certainly your perogative.

https://www.ilnews.org/news/economy/...3243c1a1f.html

I tend to be risk averse, so I'm following the jobs and the stable economy. Even for someone who's not risk averse, I don't know why someone would gamble when it comes to purchasing a home. Plus, I can't stand those yellow brick split levels and all of the odd looking 60's builds in the suburbs. I do, however, love the grid neighborhood feel.

Anyways, if I'm a renter in the city? I'm right there with you.
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Old 02-27-2018, 03:02 PM
 
Location: New England
1,925 posts, read 1,070,115 times
Reputation: 1682
Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
So you want to tear down single family housing to build multi family? Because there is multi family being built in plenty of places, or multi unit. Lots of it.
If the economics in the area support it yes. One example that I would use is the Chestnut Hill MBTA station. It's stupid to have large lot single family homes right on top of a rapid transit station.

Lots of towns in the area (between 495 and 128) also have zoning that requires each lot to be an acre. That type of "snob" zoning is widespread throughout the area.

I understand why it is widespread. People who own in suburban towns don't want additional development to clog up the schools/roads. But every town in the suburban Boston area thinks like this. Because of that we have a housing shortage.

That and a transit system that hasn't been noticeably expanded or improved in 40 years.

Last edited by tysmith95; 02-27-2018 at 03:14 PM..
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Old 02-27-2018, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
1,605 posts, read 738,738 times
Reputation: 1393
Quote:
Originally Posted by tysmith95 View Post
If the economics in the area support it yes. One example that I would use is the Chestnut Hill MBTA station. It's stupid to have large lot multi family developments right on top of a rapid transit station.

Lots of towns in the area (between 495 and 128) also have zoning that requires each lot to be an acre. That type of "snob" zoning is widespread throughout the area.

I understand why it is widespread. People who own in suburban towns don't want additional development to clog up the schools/roads. But every town in the suburban Boston area thinks like this. Because of that we have a housing shortage.

That and a transit system that hasn't been noticeably expanded or improved in 40 years.
It's so true. There's no other metro, with this kind of demand, like it. Even in Seattle, suburbs have been far more willing to build and expand without specific requirements. In Chicago, you see apartment complex after condo complex along major roads and the commuter rails. Even in the most upscale communities. Here? Only in the very inner ring suburbs do you see that.

On one hand, it does maintain a quiet charm. On the other, it causes a severe shortage and a hard-to-explain isolation of towns with close proximity to Boston.
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