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Old 08-14-2019, 04:30 PM
 
3 posts, read 2,902 times
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Originally Posted by Jimbo21 View Post
Sent you a DM.
Would love to hear about this as well. As the previous poster mentioned, we have a toddler in daycare and it's about $3k/month.
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Old 08-16-2019, 12:29 PM
 
95 posts, read 101,582 times
Reputation: 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfg83 View Post
Would love to hear about this as well. As the previous poster mentioned, we have a toddler in daycare and it's about $3k/month.

Sent you a DM
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Old 08-18-2019, 06:31 AM
 
37 posts, read 14,321 times
Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdfTT123 View Post
Hi all,

My family and I are considering looking into Boston as a potential location for our next move. I work in health care, and would be looking to start fellowship at the various HMS associated hospitals (BWH, MGH, BIDMC) and would need to have a reasonable commute time to these locations. My wife works in finance and we will have to kids around age of 6 months and 4 years by the time we consider moving. Our biggest priorities are safety, good child care/preschools (would consider private school if even affordable), affordable housing (would ideally looking to buy, can see us budgeting maybe 750k, but it's a stretch), and general ease of living for a young family while also ideally having some city life amenities. We understand Boston is way up there now with COL and families are fleeing. Given our situation, would this even be viable to consider or should we consider moving elsewhere?

Thanks!
There's a reason that, as you write, "families are fleeing" the area. The costs are outrageous, and housing supply continues to be severely constrained by Boston being unbuildable to the east (it's a port city) and NIMBYism leaving a lot of the surrounding suburbs far less dense than they should. I live in one of the nice suburbs west of Boston, and there are signs around now about stopping a "monster" apartment building. As long as that mindset is in place here, affordability will always be crunched. Anyway, to go through some points:

Safety, good child care and city amenities you definitely get. Schools, even in the worst towns, are generally good, though in the working class towns, the schools are no better than you could find in the affordable nice suburbs of other cities. Lexington, Boxborough, etc... are what really drag the state average up into the stratosphere.

Forget affordable housing. If you want a commute within an hour to Boston, under $750k is getting you maybe a condo or townhouse in one of the "gentrifying" suburbs like Waltham, Malden, Medford, where the schools are still shaky, or a 100 year old house that's a complete gut-job. Raising kids in homes full of lead paint, ungrounded electrical, and asbestos everything isn't ideal to me.

General ease of living sort of goes out the window due to the affordability situation. You're looking at long, soul-crushing commutes into Boston due to the poor infrastructure, unless you either deal with what would be considered grossly sub-par housing to the rest of the country (see above), or have $1mm+ to live in a decent house in Newton.

One other thing to consider, the winters are terribly long, dark and cold. This bothers me more and more every year.

There's a lot to like about the area here, but it's horribly segregated by class and NIMBYISM is driving the middle class lifestyle out. I was fortunate to buy in when things were less crazy, but plan to take that equity to another part of the country for the next chapter in my life.

I'd strongly consider looking at some "tier-2" cities, such as Philadelphia, Raleigh-Durham, Nashville, Boise, Salt Lake City, etc. You might not make as much money, but the cost of living is so much lower that you will undoubtedly have a better "quality of life" in the traditional family sense of a shorter commute, nicer housing, etc.. Despite the rampant elitism on this forum, you can find quality public schools in the suburbs of these metros, it may just mean buying the 1999 built house in the nicer town at 2,200 sqft instead of the new construction 3,600 mansion. Still beats the 1940s 1,100 sqft house near Boston, IMO.
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Old 08-18-2019, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,732 posts, read 1,492,563 times
Reputation: 2455
Quote:
Originally Posted by smc733 View Post
There's a reason that, as you write, "families are fleeing" the area. The costs are outrageous, and housing supply continues to be severely constrained by Boston being unbuildable to the east (it's a port city) and NIMBYism leaving a lot of the surrounding suburbs far less dense than they should. I live in one of the nice suburbs west of Boston, and there are signs around now about stopping a "monster" apartment building. As long as that mindset is in place here, affordability will always be crunched. Anyway, to go through some points:

Safety, good child care and city amenities you definitely get. Schools, even in the worst towns, are generally good, though in the working class towns, the schools are no better than you could find in the affordable nice suburbs of other cities. Lexington, Boxborough, etc... are what really drag the state average up into the stratosphere.

Forget affordable housing. If you want a commute within an hour to Boston, under $750k is getting you maybe a condo or townhouse in one of the "gentrifying" suburbs like Waltham, Malden, Medford, where the schools are still shaky, or a 100 year old house that's a complete gut-job. Raising kids in homes full of lead paint, ungrounded electrical, and asbestos everything isn't ideal to me.

General ease of living sort of goes out the window due to the affordability situation. You're looking at long, soul-crushing commutes into Boston due to the poor infrastructure, unless you either deal with what would be considered grossly sub-par housing to the rest of the country (see above), or have $1mm+ to live in a decent house in Newton.

One other thing to consider, the winters are terribly long, dark and cold. This bothers me more and more every year.

There's a lot to like about the area here, but it's horribly segregated by class and NIMBYISM is driving the middle class lifestyle out. I was fortunate to buy in when things were less crazy, but plan to take that equity to another part of the country for the next chapter in my life.

I'd strongly consider looking at some "tier-2" cities, such as Philadelphia, Raleigh-Durham, Nashville, Boise, Salt Lake City, etc. You might not make as much money, but the cost of living is so much lower that you will undoubtedly have a better "quality of life" in the traditional family sense of a shorter commute, nicer housing, etc.. Despite the rampant elitism on this forum, you can find quality public schools in the suburbs of these metros, it may just mean buying the 1999 built house in the nicer town at 2,200 sqft instead of the new construction 3,600 mansion. Still beats the 1940s 1,100 sqft house near Boston, IMO.
Just a note: You’re leaving out the “worst of towns” in your analysis. Where you definition get plenty for well under 750k but the schools will actually be pretty bad-not ungodly, or completely unsalvageable, but still quite poor. Housing will be poor quality but there will be walkability and more class variety within a town/city.
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Old 08-19-2019, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1,884 posts, read 3,463,647 times
Reputation: 1857
Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Historically Boston had up to 800k people in the city, over 100k more than live there today. Boston had more people living in the city in 1920 than it will in 2020. The city lost over 30% of it's population from 1950 - 1980
Yes but back then everyone lived together as a family and multiple generations packed those three deckers. There was no need to fight over rent as not as many people rented back then.
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Old 09-01-2019, 10:23 AM
 
841 posts, read 250,242 times
Reputation: 602
Quote:
I think you need another reason for wanting Boston specifically other than just wanting to move somewhere for the sake of it.
Um no. People are allowed to live wherever they please, and are able to afford, obviously.
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Old 09-01-2019, 10:30 AM
 
841 posts, read 250,242 times
Reputation: 602
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkone View Post
Move to Providence, Hartford, Springfield metro areas instead.
As much as I would love everyone to move to the Hartford area as that city has been in nothing but depressing decline for going on 30 years now, Nobody is moving to the Hartford area. People are moving away. I guess I trust their judgment of the area, but really it's the entire state. As the state loses more and more population, taxes go up and up. It's a downward spiral.
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Old 09-01-2019, 10:34 AM
 
841 posts, read 250,242 times
Reputation: 602
Quote:
Boston needs less people not more.
Bostons already hit critical mass. People are literally moving from all over the world to Boston for jobs. I don't even think a recession could stop the city's growth now.
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Old 09-01-2019, 05:09 PM
 
37 posts, read 14,321 times
Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
Um no. People are allowed to live wherever they please, and are able to afford, obviously.
I think he/she was merely suggesting that you should have a good reason to live here to make it worthwhile, since for those but the most wealthy, your QOL will arguably go down if you're just living a normal lifestyle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
Bostons already hit critical mass. People are literally moving from all over the world to Boston for jobs. I don't even think a recession could stop the city's growth now.
This has always been the case for Boston that it attracts people internationally for well-paying jobs. This is why its always been expensive. It's nonsense to say a recession couldn't stop it's growth, for one, growth of Boston and MA has slowed over the past decade. MA has population outflow to cheaper tier-2 cities. A recession can very well have an impact. The late 80s recession impacted "hot" cities the most, it's very likely the next will do the same.
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Old 09-01-2019, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
8,900 posts, read 7,872,150 times
Reputation: 7875
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
Bostons already hit critical mass. People are literally moving from all over the world to Boston for jobs. I don't even think a recession could stop the city's growth now.
Lol yeah exactly
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