U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Yesterday, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,584 posts, read 1,433,704 times
Reputation: 2353

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maddie104 View Post
I agree I don't think donuts are a measure of food scene. In my opinion there are good restaurants in the area but he is referring to variety of cusine. I don't recall Boston having good barbeque or cajun for example. There is Italian in the North End but I don't know of a lot of other ethnic oriented restaurants as compared to other major cities. When my husband and I visited a few months ago, I commented that I did not see a lot of stand alone neighborhood specialty food shops -- cheeses, coffee, teas, fresh fish stores, butcher shops, bakeries.

Perhaps the demographics of the Boston area wouldn't support such a variety but the point of comparison is from an outsider's view.
The demographics of Boston support corner stores and general Ďmartsí like any other city. I donít know how many major cities have plentiful cheese, coffee shops, tea shops, bakeries etc...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Yesterday, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,157 posts, read 2,047,745 times
Reputation: 1877
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
The fact that people in the Boston area are content with the segmentation of quality entertainment dining and retail is unique. Everywhere else I go in the country a big focus of communities cities and towns is having the same quality options across the metro area. In Boston if a few clustered towns provide something special that’s good enough for ‘Boston’. My friends from other places always ask why so many pizzerias and dunks? The lack of options and variety over a substantial are-for what people expect of BOSTON- is definitely underwhelming.
Anecdotally, the nearby food options were 100x better when I was living in Groton, CT vs now that I’m living in Roxbury. I used to be a ~10 min drive from good Mexican, Thai, Indian, and Filipino restaurants. Now I don’t even know of any good Indian restaurants south of the river. Maybe one on Dot Ave, but that’s it.

Mission Hill has been getting better. I really like Nachlo. But I agree it’s hard to find good food in Boston that isn’t pizza, pasta, burritos, or meh Chinese.


Edit: to be clear, the Boston area does have a better food scene than Groton. You just wouldn’t be able to tell by looking at a 3mi radius around my house.

Last edited by iAMtheVVALRUS; Yesterday at 10:23 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,584 posts, read 1,433,704 times
Reputation: 2353
I wa adjust having this conversation with my wife and I said

“when I lived in Boston we basically ate pizza , Italian, donuts or takeout all the time”

Where as in Jersey she ate bagels pizza soul food Mediterranean diner food indian

Here in Maryland there’s a much greater variety of fast food-dozens of chains we don’t have, we eat crab, and chicken boxes more often, but there’s also pit beef, tons of seafood, and great restaurant pretty evenly distributed throughout. It doesn’t matter if the area is even incorporated or not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,584 posts, read 1,433,704 times
Reputation: 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
Anecdotally, the nearby food options were 100x better when I was living in Groton, CT vs now that Iím living in Roxbury. I used to be a ~10 min drive from good Mexican, Thai, Indian, and Filipino restaurants. Now I donít even know of any good Indian restaurants south of the river. Maybe one on Dot Ave, but thatís it.

Mission Hill has been getting better. I really like Nachlo. But I agree itís hard to find good food in Boston that isnít pizza, pasta, burritos, or meh Chinese.
I would expect so. I used to spend time on Marcella street and had trouble finding anything to eat outside of AKs Dominos and Yum Yums. Which are kind of all the same thing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:25 AM
 
1,032 posts, read 263,918 times
Reputation: 1752
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
The demographics of Boston support corner stores and general ‘marts’ like any other city. I don’t know how many major cities have plentiful cheese, coffee shops, tea shops, bakeries etc...
Here is "specialty food stores" in Philadelphia area. Did not do a sort so not all fit the profile. To be fair, the population here is much larger.

https://www.yelp.com/search?find_des...hia%2C+PA&ns=1

There are also many byo boutique restaurants -- contributing to a variety of dining options at affordable prices. I recenty went to a Norwegian restaurant -- wonderful food and byo. These type restaurants can be found throughout the metro area.

Referring to demographics, I wonder if it is the Boston student population as percentage of total population that contributes to the saturation of pizza and doughnuts. It doesn't help the perception of an outsider though.

It is not my intention to derail this thread and make this about Boston vs. Philadelphia. It's just an example of outsider perspective.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 11:04 AM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,652 posts, read 2,379,470 times
Reputation: 2918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maddie104 View Post
I agree I don't think donuts are a measure of food scene. In my opinion there are good restaurants in the area but he is referring to variety of cusine. I don't recall Boston having good barbeque or cajun for example. There is Italian in the North End but I don't know of a lot of other ethnic oriented restaurants as compared to other major cities. When my husband and I visited a few months ago, I commented that I did not see a lot of stand alone neighborhood specialty food shops -- cheeses, coffee, teas, fresh fish stores, butcher shops, bakeries.

Perhaps the demographics of the Boston area wouldn't support such a variety but the point of comparison is from an outsider's view.
to be fair there are a lot of haitian or other west-indian restaurants even in caucasion neighborhoods. are you sure you were in boston ?

ive been to atlanta a few times. great southern soul food; but, boston has much more variety.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 11:13 AM
 
665 posts, read 274,192 times
Reputation: 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
I wa adjust having this conversation with my wife and I said

ďwhen I lived in Boston we basically ate pizza , Italian, donuts or takeout all the timeĒ

Where as in Jersey she ate bagels pizza soul food Mediterranean diner food indian

Here in Maryland thereís a much greater variety of fast food-dozens of chains we donít have, we eat crab, and chicken boxes more often, but thereís also pit beef, tons of seafood, and great restaurant pretty evenly distributed throughout. It doesnít matter if the area is even incorporated or not.
I respect your opinion for things Boston but I know food..Iíve eaten all over...I do not say Boston is tops in food..it is no slouch though..have you been to all the places below in Boston or inner ring suburbs...honestly sarma in Somerville might just be my favorite food experience..

a quick yelp search produces (and not all are listed on yelp)

- Well over 200 places serving some combination of Japanese, Asian fusion, izikaya, sushi, ramen - there are asian grocery stores all over including an H Mart in Cambridge
- at least 15 places serving poke
- over 60 places serving thai or Vietnamese
- well over 100 serving Szechuan, Chinese, or dim sum
- well over 140 middle eastern, Greek, Turkish, Armenian
- over 120 and counting of restaurants serving Caribbean, Haitian, Puerto rican, trinidadian, or Venezuelan
- over 50 serving Brazilian
- 10 serving Ethiopian
- over 100 Mexican
Over 120 and counting Indian
- French, italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Irish, English tons and tons

- try sweet cheeks on Boylston if youre looking for barbecue

- for a donut avoid dunkin and try blackbird or union square donuts
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 11:33 AM
 
665 posts, read 274,192 times
Reputation: 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maddie104 View Post
Here is "specialty food stores" in Philadelphia area. Did not do a sort so not all fit the profile. To be fair, the population here is much larger.

https://www.yelp.com/search?find_des...hia%2C+PA&ns=1

There are also many byo boutique restaurants -- contributing to a variety of dining options at affordable prices. I recenty went to a Norwegian restaurant -- wonderful food and byo. These type restaurants can be found throughout the metro area.

Referring to demographics, I wonder if it is the Boston student population as percentage of total population that contributes to the saturation of pizza and doughnuts. It doesn't help the perception of an outsider though.

It is not my intention to derail this thread and make this about Boston vs. Philadelphia. It's just an example of outsider perspective.
Seems enough to me?

https://m.yelp.com/search?find_desc=...-2996&start=60
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 11:55 AM
 
1,032 posts, read 263,918 times
Reputation: 1752
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
to be fair there are a lot of haitian or other west-indian restaurants even in caucasion neighborhoods. are you sure you were in boston ?

ive been to atlanta a few times. great southern soul food; but, boston has much more variety.
Based on the criteria from an earlier posted earlier: Have you lived in Atlanta? Do you know where to look?

Getting too subjective. If someone wants to cite an an objective expert source, comparing Atlanta vs. Boston cusine fine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 12:52 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,652 posts, read 2,379,470 times
Reputation: 2918
^ i honestly think my 2 sentences above are volumes of times more objective than the 7 paragraphs in the o.p. (boston food sux because the only option is dunkin' donuts).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top