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Old 09-16-2021, 02:27 PM
 
2,099 posts, read 1,006,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Lampert, this is why black people are upset. We firmly wanted Kim Janey. White Bostonians basically said, "no." The black candidate black people wanted "isn't good enough" for white Bostonians.
I don't really agree white bostonians just said "no". It looks a lot more "any bostonian that isn't black said no".
To me is pretty easy to say that the Asian candidate was simply more appealing to the white Bostonians. Not Because Janey is black and Wu is Asian.

I want to make clear that I have no problems in believing that a certain number of white Bostonians would not vote for a black candidate. What I have hard time believing is that this is a large portion of the population, especially among the people that voted Wu.

Janey performed poorly in East Boston, majority latino. She is in every precinct behind Wu and George and most times also slightly behind Campbell.

The white-historic Bostonians clearly went for the the most conservative candidate. And for sure these are the areas where Janey performed the worst, often with half the votes of Campbell and Wu.
But look at the area that went for Wu, a lot of these are very diverse parts of Boston and Janey performed poorly in a lot of this area. Districts in Roxbury that are 55% black and 40% latino and 6% white went 50% for Janey, if the vote was truly racialized it means she garnered almost no support among latinos.

Ultimately the question is, who did Janey appealed to? It doesn't seems she appealed to whites, latinos or asians....assuming she appealed to blacks, how are you going to win by only appealing to blacks?
25% of the population is black in Boston, she got 19.5%.

I think Janey should primarily blame her campaign for the defeat.

PS thank you for the link to the map.
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Old 09-16-2021, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Boston
2,178 posts, read 937,543 times
Reputation: 1874
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lampert View Post
I don't really agree white bostonians just said "no". It looks a lot more "any bostonian that isn't black said no".
To me is pretty easy to say that the Asian candidate was simply more appealing to the white Bostonians. Not Because Janey is black and Wu is Asian.

I want to make clear that I have no problems in believing that a certain number of white Bostonians would not vote for a black candidate. What I have hard time believing is that this is a large portion of the population, especially among the people that voted Wu.

Janey performed poorly in East Boston, majority latino. She is in every precinct behind Wu and George and most times also slightly behind Campbell.

The white-historic Bostonians clearly went for the the most conservative candidate. And for sure these are the areas where Janey performed the worst, often with half the votes of Campbell and Wu.
But look at the area that went for Wu, a lot of these are very diverse parts of Boston and Janey performed poorly in a lot of this area. Districts in Roxbury that are 55% black and 40% latino and 6% white went 50% for Janey, if the vote was truly racialized it means she garnered almost no support among latinos.

Ultimately the question is, who did Janey appealed to? It doesn't seems she appealed to whites, latinos or asians....assuming she appealed to blacks, how are you going to win by only appealing to blacks?
25% of the population is black in Boston, she got 19.5%.

I think Janey should primarily blame her campaign for the defeat.

PS thank you for the link to the map.
I tend to agree. It's not that Janey "wasn't good enough" or some other overgeneralized assumption, but rather she wasn't aligned enough on one or two issues to pull more votes.

The questions to be asking right now is why those who didn't vote for Janey voted the way they did, and learn from that. It may well be as simple as Janey's hesitance on vaccine passports or some other single issue pushed enough people into another candidate's camp to tank her bid. These candidates were largely aligned on ideology, so it really was coming down to the little differences.
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Old 09-16-2021, 04:21 PM
 
8,546 posts, read 5,480,240 times
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So how will white voters cast their ballots now that both candidates are being touted as women of color:

Wu the Asian

Essaibi-George as the daughter of a Tunisian Arab?
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Old 09-17-2021, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
18,605 posts, read 8,985,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robr2 View Post
So how will white voters cast their ballots now that both candidates are being touted as women of color:

Wu the Asian

Essaibi-George as the daughter of a Tunisian Arab?
https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/09/...-off-an-upset/


Michelle Wu starts the final mayoral election with a 48 percent to 28 percent lead over Annissa Essaibi George, according to a poll released by a group called Policy for Progress this week.


Like Essaibi George, [Eric] Adams ran to the right of his liberal rivals and put an emphasis on public safety. And he picked up a lot of working-class Black and Latino votes in the process.

But Adams, who is Black, has an easier time appealing to voters of color than his Boston counterpart. Essaibi George, whose father emigrated from Tunisia and mother is Polish-American, hasn’t done nearly as well among Black and Latino voters.

The new survey, putting her head-to-head with Wu, suggests that problem could carry into the final election.

The poll of 522 likely voters, conducted Sept. 10-11 by Public Policy Polling, shows Wu leading Essaibi George by 15 points among Latino voters, 33 points among Black voters, and 42 points among Asian American voters.

Even white voters, considered a vital demographic for Essaibi George, prefer Wu by a substantial margin — 13 points.

Essaibi George will, no doubt, try to improve her standing among white voters. But the Globe’s June survey shows they are actually more likely to identify as “liberal” or “very liberal” than Black and Latino voters.

That suggests that [Annissa's] clearest path to a surprise victory runs not through white Boston but through the Black and Latino communities where she has struggled.

...

Unless white people panic and shift towards Annissa, heavily, I don't think she has much of a chance. But yea there is a chance that enough white voters become worried about "becoming Seattle/Baltimore/Portland/New York/Chicago/etc..." like they say online..(what does this even mean? Totally different cities...) that theoretically, it could happen. Aside from Annissa being white and not black like Adams, the issue of Public safety is THE top concern in NYC in 2021. It is 4/5 in Boston. Additionally, the white vote is a larger share of Boston voters than NYC.

The chances of George picking up an endorsement from Janey or Andrea are slim to none.
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Old 09-17-2021, 04:59 PM
 
2,769 posts, read 1,645,486 times
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Yeah it's looking like Wu, Unless just as stated above sGeorge can grab a huge part of the Janey camp (which I can't see how). I think it's going to be an interesting time, and I think George is too status quo for the younger voters, no matter what race. I just hope we break records in people showing up to the polls. That would be something worth noting.
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Old 09-17-2021, 05:05 PM
 
3,773 posts, read 1,568,385 times
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Well it was a primary, so once the average voter figures out that there's only one candidate who isn't intent on creating another Chicago or Seattle they may be inspired to get out. Then again, it may be too far gone.
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Old 09-17-2021, 05:10 PM
 
2,769 posts, read 1,645,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostongymjunkie View Post
Well it was a primary, so once the average voter figures out that there's only one candidate who isn't intent on creating another Chicago or Seattle they may be inspired to get out. Then again, it may be too far gone.
too far gone is where we've been. It's either buckle up and go for the ride, or be the old guys talking about the good old days.
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Old 09-19-2021, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
18,605 posts, read 8,985,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostongymjunkie View Post
Well it was a primary, so once the average voter figures out that there's only one candidate who isn't intent on creating another Chicago or Seattle they may be inspired to get out. Then again, it may be too far gone.
I don't know where any additional voters come from. Th Annissa are all on the absolutely edges of the city and per Bill Forry- they really came out 40%.+ turnout for her in the prelim. Her voters are the type that go to the polls, and not the undecided. 77.5% of Boston wanted someone progressive. Realistically it more than that-many do the younger and minority voters don't come out. Virtually everywhere annissa didn't win, Wu was ahead of her.
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Old 09-19-2021, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
18,605 posts, read 8,985,379 times
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https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/09/...neighborhoods/


“Talk about white guilt,” said Anne Rousseau, who is white and the cofounder of Jamaica Plain Progressives, a political group. “There’s a lot of anger against us and I do not blame people for being disappointed. I’m disappointed.”

Back in July, the JP Progressives leadership voted 12 to 1 to endorse Janey over Wu, despite Wu’s deep political roots in Jamaica Plain, cultivated over her 10 years in office. But the group’s 1,000 members voted otherwise, dividing their votes between Wu and Janey. Ultimately the organization did not endorse anyone, Rousseau said.

We were hoping that by stepping back as white allies and listening to groups of predominantly people of color ... that we would take their lead and garner more support for Kim,” said Rousseau. The fact that did not happen “to me was personally disappointing, and it shows that we have a lot more work to do.”

Elugardo, who cochaired Bernie Sanders’ Massachusetts committee, said that for Boston’s Black residents to succeed politically they are expected to speak, perform, and generally seem like white progressives. She said that even though Janey was doing the work as mayor, white progressives demanded more from her, including detailed plans on matters such as rent control.

Still she said the group she cofounded in 2009 that had worked hard to get progressive candidates has some reflecting to do about what it means to align with communities of color and “what it means to be a white progressive.”
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Old 09-19-2021, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Medfid
6,319 posts, read 4,855,153 times
Reputation: 4703
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/09/...neighborhoods/


“Talk about white guilt,” said Anne Rousseau, who is white and the cofounder of Jamaica Plain Progressives, a political group. “There’s a lot of anger against us and I do not blame people for being disappointed. I’m disappointed.”

Back in July, the JP Progressives leadership voted 12 to 1 to endorse Janey over Wu, despite Wu’s deep political roots in Jamaica Plain, cultivated over her 10 years in office. But the group’s 1,000 members voted otherwise, dividing their votes between Wu and Janey. Ultimately the organization did not endorse anyone, Rousseau said.

We were hoping that by stepping back as white allies and listening to groups of predominantly people of color ... that we would take their lead and garner more support for Kim,” said Rousseau. The fact that did not happen “to me was personally disappointing, and it shows that we have a lot more work to do.”

Elugardo, who cochaired Bernie Sanders’ Massachusetts committee, said that for Boston’s Black residents to succeed politically they are expected to speak, perform, and generally seem like white progressives. She said that even though Janey was doing the work as mayor, white progressives demanded more from her, including detailed plans on matters such as rent control.

Still she said the group she cofounded in 2009 that had worked hard to get progressive candidates has some reflecting to do about what it means to align with communities of color and “what it means to be a white progressive.”
Sounds more like a white savior complex to me than white guilt. I don't know why these people feel it's their responsibility to put Janey on a pedestal just for being black. Furthermore, I know Asians don't count as POC (right?), but Wu is still a visible minority. The rhetoric in the excerpt almost makes it sound like Wu is white..
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