U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-21-2009, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Philly/Camden :)
47 posts, read 130,735 times
Reputation: 13

Advertisements

Does Boston have good public transportation?
How about rent prices?

Someone told me that Boston is like a smaller Philadelphia. Would you agree?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-21-2009, 01:30 PM
 
44 posts, read 147,076 times
Reputation: 28
Well, yes, the public transport is good - unless you've lived in New York, or London, or someplace where buses and trains run 24/7 and one comes every few minutes. In Boston, the subway + commuter rail train systems cover a lot of ground in the city itself, but not enough into the surrounding suburbs. It's not expensive, it's easy to use, and where the train doesn't go, buses usually go- it just takes a while to get places if you have to transfer or change bus/train or vice versa.

Rents? A wide range, but in my experience, inside Boston itself you're looking at roughly:
850+ studio, 1000+ 1-bedroom, 1100+ 2-bed, 1300+ 3-bed, etc.
That's median/typical, OK? - so I'm leaving out what things cost in really poor, run-down AND really rich, luxurious streets.

I haven't been in Philly in a long time, but they're more alike than different.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2009, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Dallas
4,625 posts, read 8,537,573 times
Reputation: 3804
I think Boston is significantly nicer and cleaner than Philly. It's also much more expensive. The T is good. Here's some pictures, see for yourself:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/3962625-post5.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2009, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Newton, Mass.
2,954 posts, read 10,801,105 times
Reputation: 1483
Quote:
Originally Posted by treegirl17 View Post
Someone told me that Boston is like a smaller Philadelphia. Would you agree?
I don't agree that they're more alike than different.

There were some airline commercials a while back where some guy said of Philadelphia "It's like a Baby New York." The Boston Phoenix ran an article saying that "if anyone said that about [Boston], I'd probably punch him."

The Best 2004

So if Boston isn't willing to be a "smaller New York," it sure isn't a "smaller Philadephia."

While the cities have similarities, they are very different cities. Boston and Philadelphia are more alike than Boston and, say, Phoenix, because they're northeastern cities with high population density and a lot of brick. But that's kind of where the similarities end. While Philadelphia is bigger in size and population, in my mind Boston is more prominent, more sophisticated, and more interesting. Boston has its gritty areas, but they don't look or feel the same as Philadelphia's gritty areas. I think the Boston area has more nice psrts than Philly and is generally not as dangerous.

I like Philly for purposes of passing through, but I don't think I want to live there. I'm totally biased, but I absolutely love Boston.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2009, 09:46 PM
 
1,693 posts, read 3,216,971 times
Reputation: 1992
Philadelphia has vast tracts of brick row houses set in grid-style blocks whereas Boston outside the central area quickly turns to wood construction, mostly two and three-family houses close together but not attached. Boston's streets follow land contours, old property lines, vanished wetland boundaries, old stage coach and wagon roads, and so on, but they don't have the fixed geometry of the grid. You can get lost more easily but it's a lot more varied and interesting to my way of thinking. Philadelphia gets very beautiful in its wealthier districts; it's hard to beat the fieldstone walls, picturesque siting, and gorgeous landscaping (especially at this time of year) in Chestnut Hill, Mt Airy, Germantown, and in many of the suburbs. Philadelphia was much more industrial, a huge manufacturing and railroading center before World War II, and retains more of an industrial city feel than Boston. Boston is more of a regional capital -- of New England and the Maritime provinces -- whereas Phila, which once dominated the whole United States, now presides over the Delaware Valley and that's about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2009, 10:01 PM
 
1,270 posts, read 4,777,712 times
Reputation: 559
Default Boston vs Philly

Also Philadelphia does have a harbor area, with a connecting smaller river (like Charles River). although the river is much smaller than the charles basin it is still similar in that respect that it connects with the harbor.
And also there's a big park in the heart of dowtown (roosevelt park) in Philly, similar to the Common in Boston. The Chain of parks by Fairmont park kind of reminds me of the Fenway in boston. I guess one of the key differences would be that there are more hills right in the downtown area and real close, and also there is an ocean right next to Boston, whereas Philly is a little inland from the sea. Whereas' boston has baked beans and Italian Food, Philly has cream cheese and Cheesesteaks :-) Also Boston and Philly are both heavily into sports , big sports towns. Bosth cities have good transit systems connecting the cities and commuter rail networks. I think Boston has more parkland-trail areas hiking areas, and such within 40 miles N S or W of the city than Philly though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2009, 04:31 AM
 
Location: Philly/Camden :)
47 posts, read 130,735 times
Reputation: 13
Thanks. I guess the person I met on the train was just comparing the cities cause I haven't really been around the world. I work in Chestnut Hill and I prefer to live in South Philly. I am living in Camden, NJ. And before you judge I am not like most inner city young adult I have similar stories but I am different, very different. I honestly wish Camden was better cause I would stay and go to the local community college. I just wanted to know. I just want a city that doesn't have a bad reputation of crime. I love Philly. I love walking down Market Street on a nice 65-75 degree weather. I cannot wait to move back.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2009, 07:08 AM
 
1,693 posts, read 3,216,971 times
Reputation: 1992
Dreamworks-- Philly really has cheesesteaks! And plenty of Italian food. Boston had baked beans in the 19th century but who eats them now?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2009, 01:07 PM
 
338 posts, read 869,027 times
Reputation: 161
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charliekeet View Post
Well, yes, the public transport is good - unless you've lived in New York, or London, or someplace where buses and trains run 24/7 and one comes every few minutes. In Boston, the subway + commuter rail train systems cover a lot of ground in the city itself, but not enough into the surrounding suburbs. It's not expensive, it's easy to use, and where the train doesn't go, buses usually go- it just takes a while to get places if you have to transfer or change bus/train or vice versa.

Rents? A wide range, but in my experience, inside Boston itself you're looking at roughly:
850+ studio, 1000+ 1-bedroom, 1100+ 2-bed, 1300+ 3-bed, etc.
That's median/typical, OK? - so I'm leaving out what things cost in really poor, run-down AND really rich, luxurious streets.

I haven't been in Philly in a long time, but they're more alike than different.
WHERE do you find studios for $850??? Maybe if you share one. Studios in a nice, safe area of the city will run you AT LEAST $900-950 (perhaps $1,000). One bedrooms and two are a bit higher than you listed also.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2009, 10:19 PM
 
5 posts, read 9,509 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConceivedinKY51 View Post
WHERE do you find studios for $850??? Maybe if you share one. Studios in a nice, safe area of the city will run you AT LEAST $900-950 (perhaps $1,000). One bedrooms and two are a bit higher than you listed also.

I agree. I don't think that you can find a 1-bed for less than $1200 inside the I-95 radius and that would be pretty low quality place too. $1500 is more like it (last year I lived in a place like that in Brookline and that was no prize either). I'm still talking about 1-bed off course.

Public transport if OK, you have choice of dense network of buses and subway within the city and its suburbs, and several commuter rail lines to take you even further. Subway is quite decrepit, commuter rail trains and cars are old too, but both still run.

Commuter rail monthly passes can be called expensive I guess but you've got to do what you've got to do. Park-and-ride parking rates next to the stations are now some 4-5 bucks per day.

- TomiK

Last edited by TomiK; 04-22-2009 at 10:27 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top