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Old 05-25-2009, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
61 posts, read 155,123 times
Reputation: 43

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My biggest problem is, nothing in Mass looks even remotely similar to Miami. People up here like these old school UGLY old homes. This whole state looks like backwoods country to me. Personally, this place looks like an old beaten down junkyard.

Maybe I'm just a city slicker!

In any event, this is starting to seem like the wrong state for me.
Maybe I'm expecting to find some sort of normalcy in something, *anything*, that looks or feels even remotely similar.

I'm not sure what my next move is going to be. Maybe I'll move to the city next year, and try that out, although I'm not good on dealing with a lot of noise. Still trying to find the right neighborhood that I can live NEAR the city but not quite in the city. A neighborhood that looks *new* like a new condo development or a new spec home neighborhood development, give me something similar to Florida for crying out loud.

Anyone have any ideas as to an area that might offer something like this?
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Old 05-25-2009, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Boston
7,336 posts, read 15,298,585 times
Reputation: 8612
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lcstyle View Post
My biggest problem is, nothing in Mass looks even remotely similar to Miami. People up here like these old school UGLY old homes. This whole state looks like backwoods country to me. Personally, this place looks like an old beaten down junkyard.

Maybe I'm just a city slicker!

In any event, this is starting to seem like the wrong state for me.
Maybe I'm expecting to find some sort of normalcy in something, *anything*, that looks or feels even remotely similar.

I'm not sure what my next move is going to be. Maybe I'll move to the city next year, and try that out, although I'm not good on dealing with a lot of noise. Still trying to find the right neighborhood that I can live NEAR the city but not quite in the city. A neighborhood that looks *new* like a new condo development or a new spec home neighborhood development, give me something similar to Florida for crying out loud.

Anyone have any ideas as to an area that might offer something like this?
Why on EARTH would you move to the Northeast if you want the suburban style condo developments (they ARE suburban) that you find in Miami and the rest of the sunbelt. We don't have them here... at least not in large numbers, so you're going to likely be S.O.L. if that's what you want.

Boston is the fourth most urban city in the U.S. (behind only New York, Chicago, and San Francisco in terms of population density). If you want urban, you can get it here. Look in any neighborhood around downtown Boston (i.e. Back Bay, Beacon Hill, North End, South End, etc) as well as neighboring cities and towns like Cambridge, Somerville and much of Brookline. if you really are a "city slicker" as you say you are, there is more "city" in a fraction of Boston than there is in the entire state of Florida. I'm guessing you're a suburbanite since you want modern condos (like what's cropping up in Sunbelt suburbs everywhere) and "not much noise" and an overall area identical to Florida which is the epitome of suburban sprawl.

You may be able to find something that is passable for what you're looking for; it won't, however, be those newer condo developments like Miami. Boston is an older city and the architecture here is historic and as you've mentioned, old. I personally take a well-built historic home over the cheap modern crap that plagues the sunbelt (and will be dated within a decade) any day, but for those who prefer newer condos, Boston only has a little to offer. Some of the few newer condos are located in Cambridge (Archstone and Northpoint (http://www.northpointcambridge.com/residential.html - broken link)). Also, the South Boston Waterfront area has a good deal of newer construction. It won't be on the same wavelength as what you'll find in Miami though. It'll also probably be prohibitively expensive.

I'm assuming you're in the suburbs now. Boston's suburbs are different in that they typically grew around historic, and previously independent, town centers. In order to "preserve" these town centers and the historic homes and buildings that occupy them (those, "old school UGLY old homes" as you so eloquently put it), zoning laws were put into place that required set backs and large minimum lot sizes. As a result, the suburban development that grows around Boston's suburbs is lower density than what you have for suburban development in most cities (i.e. Miami). This gives it that "back woods country" look that you've clearly noticed. While I tend to think that these zoning laws are a bane to suburban development in the Boston area (essentially pushing the suburbs much further outside the city than they should be to accomodate the area's growth), the people in the area love this. This is how the people with those old homes (which are really unique and important regardless of whether or not you like them) and the people who build NEW homes (usually meant to look like the older homes) get by. It's also why so many homes in the immediate Boston area cost WAY more than they should and It's ALSO why some of Boston's inner suburbs look more rural (even though they really aren't) than many cities' suburbs.

Again, you're not going to find nearly as many newer condos in Boston that's not how this area rolls. I think we're better for it. I enjoy the history and unique flavor of the area's architecture. While I think the suburbs are a mess in many ways, the area as a whole is better for the lack of flavor-of-the-month architecture. It's also why Boston's real estate prices continue to hold strong while cities like Miami have 50,000+ vacant condos and steeply falling land values and real estate prices. You may enjoy living closer to the city better (I'm willing to bet you would), but it may just be that Boston's not the best fit for you. Boston isn't like Florida at all, and I think you'll find that most people are quite happy about that (I sure am).
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Old 05-25-2009, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
61 posts, read 155,123 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Why on EARTH would you move to the Northeast if you want the suburban style condo developments (they ARE suburban) that you find in Miami and the rest of the sunbelt. We don't have them here... at least not in large numbers, so you're going to likely be S.O.L. if that's what you want.]
Your absolutely right .. I took a really good job offer up here. While I'm up here, I figure why not go to one of these great Univ's too and finish up my degree.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
if you really are a "city slicker" as you say you are, there is more "city" in a fraction of Boston than there is in the entire state of Florida. I'm guessing you're a suburbanite since you want modern condos (like what's cropping up in Sunbelt suburbs everywhere) and "not much noise" and an overall area identical to Florida which is the epitome of suburban sprawl.
It is my own ignorance that prevented me from understanding the distinction. Purely defining the distinction has helped me out immensely. I guess I AM a suburbanite. I am looking for something Suburban, but probably something a little closer to the city.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
You may be able to find something that is passable for what you're looking for; it won't, however, be those newer condo developments like Miami.
That's fine, I'm just trying to find where I fit in here, what area I would feel most comfortable in, my nook, essentially.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Boston is an older city and the architecture here is historic and as you've mentioned, old. I personally take a well-built historic home over the cheap modern crap that plagues the sunbelt (and will be dated within a decade) any day,
Hey I unwittingly agree with your point, its just nice when everything looks new and clean versus old and dirty.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Some of the few newer condos are located in Cambridge (Archstone and Northpoint (http://www.northpointcambridge.com/residential.html - broken link)). Also, the South Boston Waterfront area has a good deal of newer construction. It won't be on the same wavelength as what you'll find in Miami though. It'll also probably be prohibitively expensive.
Hah! I actually singled in on Archstone about a month ago when I was furiously searching. I'll take the fact that this is the second time that Archstone has been mentioned to me under consideration.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
I'm assuming you're in the suburbs now.
I'm right near The Natick Collection Mall (purely coincidental, my company's corporate office is a hop skip and a jump away from where I live).

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Boston's suburbs are different in that they typically grew around historic, and previously independent, town centers. In order to "preserve" these town centers and the historic homes and buildings that occupy them (those, "old school UGLY old homes" as you so eloquently put it),
I'm not here to change anything, I realize I moved here, not the other way around. Im just trying to adjust as best as I can.
I am usually the first one to champion history over "noveau riche" contemporary values or ideals, which is what Miami is all about.
I just have a hard time finding the "heart" or "culture" of this place, I guess that will come with time, most areas in Miami are homogenous and closer together, while things here are spread further apart. It makes everything feel so distant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
zoning laws were put into place that required set backs and large minimum lot sizes. As a result, the suburban development that grows around Boston's suburbs is lower density than what you have for suburban development in most cities (i.e. Miami). This gives it that "back woods country" look that you've clearly noticed.
This makes a lot of sense, this is probably also why the traffic isnt as insane every where you go, theres less density, thank god for that im not complaining about this believe me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
It's ALSO why some of Boston's inner suburbs look more rural (even though they really aren't) than many cities' suburbs.
Hmmmm,, I'll keep this in mind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
While I think the suburbs are a mess in many ways, the area as a whole is better for the lack of flavor-of-the-month architecture. It's also why Boston's real estate prices continue to hold strong while cities like Miami have 50,000+ vacant condos and steeply falling land values and real estate prices.
Hey I totally agree with you on this point, Miami is totally insane with condo developments and over-building. I do agree with your point though in that it does seem like the suburbs are somewhat of a mess. There's no real local hangout spot out here, sure the Mall is there but I don't want to hangout at the Mall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
You may enjoy living closer to the city better (I'm willing to bet you would), but it may just be that Boston's not the best fit for you. Boston isn't like Florida at all, and I think you'll find that most people are quite happy about that (I sure am).
I definitely agree, and I just want to thank you for taking the time to post your opinions as they have definitely helped me. It is taking some getting used to, and whenever I visit Miami I tend to be reminded why the hell I got out of there in the first place, the constant traffic and heat, overly dense rude people everywhere you go.
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Old 05-25-2009, 07:40 PM
 
2,312 posts, read 6,517,224 times
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I am laughing reading your post. Having lived in both Miami and Boston I can't think of two cities that are further from each other on the spectrum, in looks, personality, weather, lifestyle, etc.

After a while you'll get used to the rural feel of the city and it's environs. You can make the best of your time here and spend some time visiting the rest of New England--it's a beautiful region, and you'll get to understand Boston's significance as the urban hub of a rural region. (As opposed to Miami, which is the urban center of a hundred mile long string of cities that make up South Florida as well as international capital of Latin America.)

The next thing that will shock you is how hard it is to get to know anyone. When I was in Miami it seemed like I made a new friend every week. Up here...not so much.....
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Old 05-25-2009, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Dallas
4,625 posts, read 8,528,280 times
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Hi LC,

Sounds like you're suffering a common case of culture shock to me. No surprise to me - I had the same effect when I first went from MIA to BOS. I couldn't believe someone would actually pay $1000 mth rent for some dump on Kenmore Sq when I had an apt at 4th and Collins for $200/mnth.

15 years in BOS later and obviously I have more perspective.

One thing that isn't easy to find in BOS is the "new and trendy". Boston is largely not trendy, it is historic, but that is simply a different type of beauty. Coming from MIA, I can certainly understand how BOS or any old big city will look filthy. Well, yeah, they kinda are. I find BOS more trashy and NYC more filthy, but I feel your pain. I personally removed several hundred garbage bags of trash off the Boston streets myself. And it's always been that way. They named Quincy Market after Mayor Josiah Quincy because he used to ride his horse down to the waterfront every day to make sure nobody was leaving carcass remains, rotten fish and or vegetables all over and stinking up the place. He was so successful at this they named that part of the market at Fanueil Hall in his honor and he is remembered 200 years later (because he successfully cleaned up the filth).

But see, to enjoy BOS, you have to recalibrate your expectations for what is good about the locale. Looking for new and trendy in BOS is like looking for good Italian food in Chinatown.

I don't know much about Doral. Is that where the restored Biltmore Hotel and golf course is? I actually help restore that hotel, and was actually shown Al Capone's penthouse. Anyways, I lived on SoBe for almost my entire three years there so that's what I know. The only thing in BOS that at all reminds me of MIA are some of the high rises along the waterfront. Charles River Park and Right across the bridge in Cambridge there are some tall condos with great views which remind me much of what's booming in SoBe and Brickell. And down on the ground right below them is all the action of Newbury St and Back Bay, etc. That to me is the nearest you get to MIA for style and culture.

I see the two cities this way: Boston is a place for books and clothes. Miami is a place for sex. They are just that different. One is a world academic capital and the other is the hottest party spot this side of Rio. People in Boston are more studious and cerebral yet stodgy, while in Miami they are all party and fun but less intellectual.

The other hard thing to digest about BOS is it it hard to get a circle of friends in BOS. It takes a long time, unless you go to the colleges, in which you'll meet everybody all at once.

And why a young dude like yourself lives all the way out in Newton I can't imagine. You should live in Back Bay, Fenway, Brookline or someplace like that where the youth is. That place out there by Chestnut Hill is great for families or geezers. You should be here:

http://www.mediafire.com/imgbnc.php/11f5694562174c7fa41e069ab43b75575g.jpg (broken link)

If you haven't really explored downtown BOS, well you're missing the best part. Nightlife pales to MIA, but you can have a good time, especially if you live right in the heart of it. Nothing to me is greater than stumbling home drunk in Back Bay. Here's more pix of places I think you'd like better:

Photo Thread: Back Bay, Beacon, Downtown, Chinatown

The other thing that I think you can discover about BOS which is great is its history. The beauty of the "old school" houses as you call them is in their eternity. If you think about it, it's a marvel to sit in a tavern where George Washington used to drink with John Adams. Or that the entire neighborhood existed when Lincoln was young. Look at the tombstones in the Old Granary burying group and you will instantly know you are looking back into a time which was altogether another world. During the 18th and 19th centuries the most skilled of craftsman built mansions that have and likely will endure for centuries. If you keep that in mind when you stroll Beacon St or Comm Ave it will come to you - yes, these are whole neighborhoods that are true works of art whose greatness endures through the centuries. It's truly a good thing.

Plus there is so much culture in Boston. From the Irish Pubs in Southie, to the Saints Festivals in the North End, the Salem witches, the seventeenth century villages in Marblehead, the ocean life on the Cape or the North Shore to Chinatown, to the brahmins of Beacon Hill to the high brow academics of Harvard - there's just so much! You can't top partying in Sobe anywhere and I don't know if there is anyplace as beautiful as Biscayne Bay (I'm going there in two weeks YAY! ), but if you look more closely at BOS you'll find the rich history of this robust city is thick with fascinating stories of millions of people over hundreds of years.

Just as one suggestion, if there is one event I would suggest you check out, it's the Fourth of July at 9am at City Hall. It's really low key, (relatively) uncrowded and intimate. Do the parade, watch the reading, go to Fanueil Hall or the Old South Church, then go see Old Ironsides sail out.

Just like Boston doesn't accept anybody immediately, nobody digests BOS right off the bat. It's very possible BOS will never suit you because of all things, it lacks the passion of MIA. But I do think you would thrive far better in downtown BOS (which you're right, is way safer than MIA) than in gloomy Newton.

Saturday, July 4th

9am-10am – Flag Raising Ceremony and Parade
At the flag pole on the Plaza at City Hall
Follow the parade to the Granary Burial Ground where
wreaths are laid on the graves of the patriots and then
to the Old State House

10am-10:30am – Reading of the Declaration of Independence

From the balcony of the Old State House, State and Devonshire Streets
Read from the balcony as it was on July 18, 1776

10:30am-3:30pm – Tory Stories

King’s Chapel (617-523-1749)
Corner of Tremont and School Streets
Join Tory families (Loyalists) as they plan their
hurried escape from Boston to Nova Scotia
www.kings-chapel.org

11am-Noon – Oration at Faneuil Hall


The Great Hall at Faneuil Hall
A traditional oration in “the Cradle of Liberty” given
by a prominent citizen

11am-3:30pm – Puritans, Patriots and Pirates
King’s Chapel (617-523-1749)
Corner of Tremont and School Street
Tour the Burying Ground and learn about Puritan traditions
Boston’s Patriots, and tales of local Pirates
Donation requested
www.kings-chapel.org

11:30am-12:30pm – USS CONSTITUTION Turn-around
Charlestown Navy Yard to the US Coast Guard Base
(617-242-7511)
“Old Ironsides” gets underway to salute the Nation
www.oldironsides.com

Noon –12:05pm – Salute to the Nation

Off the US Coast Guard Base, North End
USS CONSTITUTION fires her 21-gun salute
www.oldironsides.com

Last edited by xS☺B☺s; 05-25-2009 at 09:17 PM.. Reason: typos
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Old 05-25-2009, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Boston
7,336 posts, read 15,298,585 times
Reputation: 8612
Lcstyle, I'd just like to take the time and thank you for a VERY well thought out response. Your first post screamed "TROLL!" and I got annoyed with what I (mistakenly) interpreted as a stab at the area (I'm guessing you could sense the condescending tone?). Let me apologize for jumping on your case without giving you a second chance to explain your situation (your situation being that you took a job here instead of moved for the heck of it).

As Clevedark mentioned, it's VERY different out here than in Miami. In fact, it's different than the bulk of the U.S. Boston's 'burbs are a strange place (as we've been over). I feel for you having moved to the 'burbs without knowing many people. It's going to make for a strange adjustment to the area. Not only is the architectural style completely different, but so are the people. We tend to be a bit more reserved and keep to ourself. For these reasons, I feel for you and your situation near the Natick Collection. It'll be much harder to meet new people (and make friends) out there than it will somewhere in or closer to the city. Natick, though minutes from the city, is WORLDS away.

Boston may never feel like home to you, but if you moved a bit closer, it may get a bit better. If that doesn't work, you're still only about a 3 hour flight from Miami (which despite my rantings in my first post is an awesome town and from November-April I'm jealous of everyone who lives there). Again, like clevedark said, you can make the best of this situation.

If you don't like the hustle and noise of downtown Boston, there are options (it doesn't just go from heavily urbanized to...well...Natick). I would look at a place like Newton. It may not have the vast array of newer housing units that you have in Miami, but many of the "old" homes are in far better shape (I personally love the Tudor architecture you can find in Newton) than what you'll find in Natick so it won't look as delapidated and weathered as some of the less affluent communities. If you think the houses that are in rough shape look bad now, wait until the winter when there's no green to at least brighten up the area.

Boston's a tough place for someone who is from (and really loves) a city like Miami. Not only is the weather rougher and the culture different (there is culture and plenty of it, just not in Natick... don't fear); but the people and lifestyle are different. The people are colder and not as openly friendly. This is no rumor, it's the truth. New Englanders are tough nuts to crack. Once you do (and you won't be able to crack everyone), you'll likely make some excellent friends.

When you look for new homes, look for something closer to the city and along a public transit line. Newton works, so would the Chesnut Hill section of Boston, Needham, Watertown and Brookline (this also put you in a good spot to commute to Natick for work). Natick feels a world away from the city. These other towns feel like part of the Boston area. While they may not be like downtown neighborhoods, they aren't as noisy and busy as the city itself. These areas are a quick rail or subway ride away from downtown and you can really enjoy the culture of the city. Furthermore, places like Brookine, Newton, and even Watertown have areas that offer activity themselves. You may have trouble finding ultra new development, but there is some of it. For example, check out the Arborpoint (http://www.arborpoint.com/woodland-station/newton.html - broken link) Condos in Newton. These condos are right at the Woodland MBTA (the "T") station which will take you to downtown Boston (or Newton Center). It's a new development in a quiet area, but close to amenities. There are a number of these around. There are also a number of new luxury condos downtown (though they're super expensive) which would set up a great opportunity for a reverse commute for you (you can live in the city and commute in the opposite direction of rush hour traffic). The Clarendon, 45 Province, Avenir, Battery Wharf, FP3, Intercontinental, Residences at the W, Residences at the Mandarin (http://mandarinresidences.com/content/index.jsp - broken link), Fan Pier, etc are all either still under construction or just wrapping up. I actually believe that there are plans for (or it's complete?) residences at the Natick Collection, but judging by how you feel about Natick, that may not be an option. Unfortunately, many of the lifestyle centers and semi-urban condo developments are on hold (or scrapped all together) in the Boston area.

Anyway, I apologize again for the rude first response. I know it's probably difficult to be new in the area and it's a heck of a change. You may not be able to find Miami in Boston, but you can make it work as good as possible. good luck!
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Old 05-25-2009, 09:06 PM
 
196 posts, read 900,154 times
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if you moved to the suburbs you didnt move to Boston
you should change the title of your thread
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Old 05-25-2009, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
61 posts, read 155,123 times
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Originally Posted by clevedark View Post
I am laughing reading your post. Having lived in both Miami and Boston I can't think of two cities that are further from each other on the spectrum, in looks, personality, weather, lifestyle, etc.
Hey I'm glad at least I can provide some comic relief here!!!

No Kidding about the opposing spectrum either, this is my first move out of state, and life never ceases to amaze me either. Just when you think you've got the world and your life figured out, BAM, a completely off the wall challenge. I would have never expected it.

Some people here have told me, "once you move once, your second move is easier, and after you move a second time, you can literally move anywhere at the drop of a dime".

I think right now I can pretty much move anywhere at the drop of a hat: because, Bostonian's are tough nuts to crack.

Quote:
Originally Posted by clevedark View Post
The next thing that will shock you is how hard it is to get to know anyone. When I was in Miami it seemed like I made a new friend every week. Up here...not so much.....
No Freaking Kidding eh? I have a gregarious, positive, outgoing nature. That typically doesn't fly too well with people down here, as any upstart in conversation with a stranger is met with a begrudging look and a somewhat smug facial expression.
After a while, I started to take it personally. Then I realized EVERYONE was like this.

In Miami, my friends considered me to be an introverted, private person. JOKES ON ME I suppose, maybe now I can go back to being the REAL ME instead of the person I became to sync up with people's attitudes and behaviour in Miami. Should I have been born here, I suppose it would have suited me better, thusly why I made the choice to move here in the first place, I thought it would be a good change of pace from the constant insanity of Miami people.

Thanks for the advice though, I'll definitely keep this in mind.
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Old 05-25-2009, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
61 posts, read 155,123 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Lcstyle, I'd just like to take the time and thank you for a VERY well thought out response. Your first post screamed "TROLL!" and I got annoyed with what I (mistakenly) interpreted as a stab at the area (I'm guessing you could sense the condescending tone?). Let me apologize for jumping on your case without giving you a second chance to explain your situation (your situation being that you took a job here instead of moved for the heck of it).
Yeah Hey no problem I can imagine that you would have felt this way about my post, since I just came on pretty strong with it eh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Boston may never feel like home to you, but if you moved a bit closer, it may get a bit better. If that doesn't work, you're still only about a 3 hour flight from Miami (which despite my rantings in my first post is an awesome town and from November-April I'm jealous of everyone who lives there). Again, like clevedark said, you can make the best of this situation.
True enough, it is only a 3 hour flight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Boston's a tough place for someone who is from (and really loves) a city like Miami. Not only is the weather rougher and the culture different (there is culture and plenty of it, just not in Natick... don't fear); but the people and lifestyle are different. The people are colder and not as openly friendly. This is no rumor, it's the truth. New Englanders are tough nuts to crack. Once you do (and you won't be able to crack everyone), you'll likely make some excellent friends.
Hopefully with some time and me moving closer to the city I can make some friends. Maybe next year. For now I'm stuck.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
There are a number of these around. There are also a number of new luxury condos downtown (though they're super expensive) which would set up a great opportunity for a reverse commute for you (you can live in the city and commute in the opposite direction of rush hour traffic). The Clarendon, 45 Province, Avenir, Battery Wharf, FP3, Intercontinental, Residences at the W, Residences at the Mandarin (http://mandarinresidences.com/content/index.jsp - broken link), Fan Pier, etc are all either still under construction or just wrapping up. I actually believe that there are plans for (or it's complete?) residences at the Natick Collection, but judging by how you feel about Natick, that may not be an option. Unfortunately, many of the lifestyle centers and semi-urban condo developments are on hold (or scrapped all together) in the Boston area.
Now this is extremely useful, exactly what I was looking for: although the prices are insane. I came up here to make some decent money and hopefully save up and buy a house somewhere. With prices like that I definitely don't think i'd be able to save. I mean, I could definitely afford it, and live the lifestyle but then my financial goals would go bye bye. ahhhh my life is the goof of all time.

"Look but don't touch. Touch, but don't taste." <<-- pretty much sums up my life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Anyway, I apologize again for the rude first response. I know it's probably difficult to be new in the area and it's a heck of a change. You may not be able to find Miami in Boston, but you can make it work as good as possible. good luck!
Hey no need for an apology as I can totally understand where your coming from and I apologize for coming off as a TROLL in the first place, takin jabs at Boston here hehehe.
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
61 posts, read 155,123 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bostonian08 View Post
Hi LC,

Sounds like you're suffering a common case of culture shock to me. No surprise to me - I had the same effect when I first went from MIA to BOS. I couldn't believe someone would actually pay $1000 mth rent for some dump on Kenmore Sq when I had an apt at 4th and Collins for $200/mnth.

15 years in BOS later and obviously I have more perspective.
Hahaha Exactly my sentiments!!!! Thanks for sharing your wisdom and perspective, it truly is refreshing to hear from someone who has already walked my path and is obviously 15 years ahead of me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bostonian08 View Post
I see the two cities this way: Boston is a place for books and clothes. Miami is a place for sex.
I can totally vouch for the whole Miami is a place for sex part...

High Five!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bostonian08 View Post
People in Boston are more studious and cerebral yet stodgy, while in Miami they are all party and fun but less intellectual.
So true, I tend to be cerebral and studious, but somehow I grew to like the superficial life I had in Miami. There's something so free'ing about just not caring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bostonian08 View Post
You should live in Back Bay, Fenway, Brookline or someplace like that where the youth is. That place out there by Chestnut Hill is great for families or geezers. You should be here:
Believe me, next year I'm SO moving closer to the city its not even funny.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bostonian08 View Post
Nothing to me is greater than stumbling home drunk in Back Bay. Here's more pix of places I think you'd like better:
Hey next year im SOO their.

Thanks for the Pics BTW , truly beautifull.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bostonian08 View Post
Just like Boston doesn't accept anybody immediately, nobody digests BOS right off the bat. It's very possible BOS will never suit you because of all things, it lacks the passion of MIA. But I do think you would thrive far better in downtown BOS (which you're right, is way safer than MIA) than in gloomy Newton.
Good info, definitely keep this in mind.

And with that folks, I think I've just about tapped you guys out and FWIW thank you very much for truly being friends and giving advice freely.

I think i'll stick around for a minute or two in Boston and see how things turn out.

I find this Forum and website to be EXTREMELY interesting and I have been perusing such off the wall places such as the Phoenix Arizona forums, the LA and California forums, truly fascinating to hear from people living in these cities and just listening to peoples viewpoints, perspectives and other such information that I was previously not privy to nor even aware of in our mundane local little worlds (at least for me).

Thanks guys! truly a pleasure.

Mods should you wish to close this thread please feel free to do so at least from my behalf.
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