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Old 09-05-2013, 05:47 PM
 
Location: God's Country
5,188 posts, read 3,501,064 times
Reputation: 8689

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A lot of the talking head experts on sports talk programs are saying that
football is attracting more would be boxers because of the big bucks
involved these days in the NFL. However, I don't see how the ability to
box necessarily translates into football talent, or vice versa. And there
are still a limited no. of jobs available in football -- just as has always
been the case. Maybe some guys can perform both sports at elite levels,
but I dunno. Something to chew over, I guess.
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Old 09-06-2013, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
519 posts, read 503,769 times
Reputation: 283
It's not just football imo. Look at the NBA. The most glaring example perhaps is LeBron. An athletic, 6'8" guy with his frame, had he taken up boxing at a young age instead of basketball, he probably would have knocked out one or both of the Klitschkos by now. Boxing is a brutal sport to envision most parents these days pushing their kids into. It definitely takes a toll on a person that lasts a lifetime. It's the same reason football and that's why there's more resistance these days from parents. At least with football, the equipment makers are spending millions in research and development trying to reduce the risks and side effects. There's simply no way to engineer the brutality out of boxing.
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Old 09-06-2013, 12:56 PM
 
322 posts, read 445,512 times
Reputation: 728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
A lot of the talking head experts on sports talk programs are saying that
football is attracting more would be boxers because of the big bucks
involved these days in the NFL. However, I don't see how the ability to
box necessarily translates into football talent, or vice versa. And there
are still a limited no. of jobs available in football -- just as has always
been the case. Maybe some guys can perform both sports at elite levels,
but I dunno. Something to chew over, I guess.
As I posted in another thread a while ago about this subject, I definitely feel that the NFL and to a certain extent the NBA is draining the potential talent pool for U.S. heavyweights. I agree that being talented in football doesn't necessarily mean that you'd be a good boxer, but you have to look at it another way. Most of the really skilled, technical boxers start out in the sport at a very early age. In the U.S., many of the kids that age who are real good athletes with size tend to gravitate toward team sports like baseball, football and basketball. There aren't many seriously athletic kids that choose boxing over these sports because average boxers generally don't make it on ESPN. They may see one or two superstars but that's about it. On the flip-side, there are college athletes that don't even make it to the pros with far more name recognition than 95% of the professional boxers fighting today.

Granted, there are only a limited number of jobs between the 2 sports but there are so many other factors involved that go unmentioned. For example, Chris Arreola a former title holder who is very marketable and someone who I would consider to be a better than average heavyweight (35-3; 30 KO's) received $605,000 in his last fight. I'm sure he's made more in other fights such as the one against Vitali Klitschko but I'm thinking not much more than $1.5MM. The point is that Arreola is better than most heavyweights out there and he still isn't commanding huge sums of money. I read somewhere that his overall net worth is about $3MM. Not bad, but that's not very much compared to what other athletes make.

In contrast, the NFL the minimum salary for rookies is $375,000 and for veterans is $425,000. The salary for the average NFL player is close to $2 MM. If you would agree with me that Chris Arreola is a better than the average fighter, then you can see how just being an average NFL journeymen can net you more over the course of a career. It took Arreola 38 fights to reach the net worth that a second-stringer can get to in roughly 2 seasons.

Lastly if you're just talking NFL, there are 32 teams with 53 roster spots. Theoretically this gives someone 1696 opportunities for a job making the kind of money we're talking about. You can just about count on one hand the number of heavyweights making as much or more than the money that Chris Arreola generally makes. The bottom line is that there are precious few opportunities in boxing to make large sums of money compared with other sports. To me, these are the biggest reason why there is a dearth of heavyweight boxers being groomed in this country.
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Old 09-15-2013, 09:23 AM
 
573 posts, read 877,327 times
Reputation: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
A lot of the talking head experts on sports talk programs are saying that
football is attracting more would be boxers because of the big bucks
involved these days in the NFL. However, I don't see how the ability to
box necessarily translates into football talent, or vice versa. And there
are still a limited no. of jobs available in football -- just as has always
been the case. Maybe some guys can perform both sports at elite levels,
but I dunno. Something to chew over, I guess.
The klitchko brothers are good. There are good fighters in the us but vitali kilitchko whoops all of them. I think if vitali was black he would get more praise. I think he is among the best heavy weights of all time.
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Old 09-15-2013, 09:25 AM
 
573 posts, read 877,327 times
Reputation: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan702 View Post
It's not just football imo. Look at the NBA. The most glaring example perhaps is LeBron. An athletic, 6'8" guy with his frame, had he taken up boxing at a young age instead of basketball, he probably would have knocked out one or both of the Klitschkos by now. Boxing is a brutal sport to envision most parents these days pushing their kids into. It definitely takes a toll on a person that lasts a lifetime. It's the same reason football and that's why there's more resistance these days from parents. At least with football, the equipment makers are spending millions in research and development trying to reduce the risks and side effects. There's simply no way to engineer the brutality out of boxing.
Labron would get killed by the klitchko brothers. Lol.
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Old 09-15-2013, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
519 posts, read 503,769 times
Reputation: 283
It's all hypothetical, but a LeBron that took up boxing as a kid instead of basketball? I wouldn't be so sure....
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Old 09-15-2013, 07:52 PM
 
573 posts, read 877,327 times
Reputation: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan702 View Post
It's all hypothetical, but a LeBron that took up boxing as a kid instead of basketball? I wouldn't be so sure....
Nikola pekovic is taller than labron so he would be champ.
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Old 09-15-2013, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
519 posts, read 503,769 times
Reputation: 283
Ok, thanks for your thoughtful analysis...
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Old 09-15-2013, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
3,169 posts, read 4,635,377 times
Reputation: 5343
As a person who used to follow boxing religiously 30+ years ago and don't care anymore, I'll state the obvious. The boxing business killed the sport. Three, four, five, ten, whatever number of titles with the different commissions dictating who can fight whom has totally taken the general public away from the sport.

Now, what's that got to do with the lack of quality heavyweights? Where do you think the interest comes from at a young age to want to get into the sport? They come from the general public where even most sports fans can't name who's champion in any weight class anymore. Years ago, everyone even knew who the last OLYMPIC heavyweight champion was in anticipation of watching him turn pro.

If you can ever whittle this back to the old days when there was one champion in each weight class, I think you would be surprised how fast the quality of the fighters would improve in America.
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Old 09-16-2013, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Back in the gym...Yo Adrian!
9,369 posts, read 18,008,881 times
Reputation: 18406
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
As a person who used to follow boxing religiously 30+ years ago and don't care anymore, I'll state the obvious. The boxing business killed the sport. Three, four, five, ten, whatever number of titles with the different commissions dictating who can fight whom has totally taken the general public away from the sport.

Now, what's that got to do with the lack of quality heavyweights? Where do you think the interest comes from at a young age to want to get into the sport? They come from the general public where even most sports fans can't name who's champion in any weight class anymore. Years ago, everyone even knew who the last OLYMPIC heavyweight champion was in anticipation of watching him turn pro.

If you can ever whittle this back to the old days when there was one champion in each weight class, I think you would be surprised how fast the quality of the fighters would improve in America.
I agree with going back to one title per weight class. I would also add that fighters shouldn't be allowed to choose their own opponents to defend the title against. There was a time when you had to win your way to a title fight by process of elimination.

The problem with boxing is that no one wants to wait 20 or 30 fights to earn a big payday. You also have MMA to compete with now, so there's going to be a lot of potential boxing talent going to MMA versus boxing, even though a top boxer will earn much more. Given today's lack of talent, I'm surprised someone hasn't come along by now to clean house. One thing you have to remember, boxing coaches don't "scout" for talent like other sports do. Someone has to walk into a boxing gym and show some interest, heart, and dedication before even getting a start as an amateur, which pays nothing. It's a long road to the top, and getting punched in the face for a living takes another level of heart and dedication which is hard to come by. Otherwise guys like Tyson, Ali, Marciano, Louis, Dempsey etc., would never have made such an impact on the division and the sport.
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