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Brevard County Space Coast: Palm Bay, Melbourne, Titusville area
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Old 05-23-2010, 10:54 PM
 
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If we lived in a coastal town that was protected by a barrier island, such as West Melbourne, Palm Bay, Titusville, etc. would we need to evacuate when a hurricane hit?

If you're not on an island or within a couple blocks of the ocean, how much trouble are hurricanes? Do you usually just ride them out and then deal with any wind or rain damage? I'm guessing any near hurricane = power outages, too, even inland?

I have some first hand experience with Hurricanes that hit NC...there most of the damage usually happened very close to the ocean, due to the storm surge. Once you got a bit inland, you were probably OK, unless your home was poorly built or you had the bad luck of getting a tree blown over on top of it or catching a spin-off tornado. Is it about the same in FL?

Last edited by adamjthompson; 05-23-2010 at 11:14 PM..
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Old 05-23-2010, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Where Trolls get BBQ'd
131,622 posts, read 43,443,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjthompson View Post
If we lived in a coastal town that was protected by a barrier island, such as West Melbourne, Palm Bay, Titusville, etc. would we need to evacuate when a hurricane hit?

If you're not on an island or within a couple blocks of the ocean, how much trouble are hurricanes? Do you usually just ride them out and then deal with any wind or rain damage? I'm guessing any near hurricane = power outages, too, even inland?

I have some first hand experience with Hurricanes that hit NC...there most of the damage usually happened very close to the ocean, due to the storm surge. Once you got a bit inland, you were probably OK, unless your home was poorly built or you had the bad luck of getting a tree blown over on top of it or catching a spin-off tornado. Is it about the same in FL?
Lots of variables. Very open ended question. I'm in the center of the state and we sometimes take a beating. Knowing that barrier islands do little to protect from a strong hurricane. Local information is what you must rely on. Even a Cat 1 is dangerous and should be taken seriously. Knowing the flood zone is critical for your area too.

National Hurricane Center
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Old 05-24-2010, 06:42 AM
 
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If you had flown over Orlando in October, 2004 and seen all the tarps on roofs that were an hour inland, you would understand that storm surge is the least of your worries. I have photos of parts of Vero Beach after Hurricane Jeanne, it looked like a war zone even a few miles inland.
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Old 05-24-2010, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Miami
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I went though a Cat 5 hurricane and it doesn't matter where you are in Florida. You can be 20 miles inland and you can have major damage. One of the storms that came in 2005, the most damage was done in the western most inland section of Broward County (coast areas were fine), hurricanes don't just come from the east here in Florida they can come from the west. As the others have said many factors go into the outcome of ones home. You will need to locate the local evacuation zone map for the area, to find out what the evacuation plan is for that particular area. Hurricanes bring wind, flood and tornadoes with them. Along with flying debris, I will never forget seeing a 2x4 that was blown into a huge Royal Palm, half the 2x4 was on one side the other half was on the other side of the palm. Sadly, I knew someone that was killed during Andrew, while they were hiding in a closet. So you just never know.

Power outages happen usually, I will never forget a hurricane that came through Miami in 2005 when I could actually see the stars in the Miami because the power outage was so wide spread. Usually the power comes on for neighborhoods closest to the most important things like hospitals and schools. Also communities with underground power will usually get their power on faster than people with above ground power. The city tries to get the most people up and running first, which will be the communities with underground wires. So invest in a generator, don't just buy the cheap loud generators, you will thank me later.
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Old 05-24-2010, 01:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Knowing the flood zone is critical for your area too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by doggiebus View Post
I went though a Cat 5 hurricane and it doesn't matter where you are in Florida. You can be 20 miles inland and you can have major damage.
So, basically, it's advantageous to not be in a flood/surge zone, but other than that it doesn't really matter? Whether we are 5 miles or 100 miles from the coast may not make any difference...it'll just depend on the hurricane?
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Old 05-24-2010, 01:38 PM
 
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[quote=doggiebus;14312044]I went though a Cat 5 hurricane and it doesn't matter where you are in Florida. You can be 20 miles inland and you can have major damage. One of the storms that came in 2005, the most damage was done in the western most inland section of Broward County (coast areas were fine), hurricanes don't just come from the east here in Florida they can come from the west. As the others have said many factors go into the outcome of ones home. You will need to locate the local evacuation zone map for the area, to find out what the evacuation plan is for that particular area. Hurricanes bring wind, flood and tornadoes with them. Along with flying debris, I will never forget seeing a 2x4 that was blown into a huge Royal Palm, half the 2x4 was on one side the other half was on the other side of the palm. Sadly, I knew someone that was killed during Andrew, while they were hiding in a closet. So you just never know.

You personally saw this?
What was the cat 5 you went through?
The structure of a hurricane is such that when you hear the wind readings it represents just a tiny tiny piece of one area of the storm. Of the giant thing you see on the radar, most is much weaker, very much weaker.
The odds of getting a hurricane hit you are low as it is and the odds of that one tiny piece of the storm passing right over you are huge. I don't mean to down play the seriousness of hurricanes but with preparation, meaning mainly trimming trees that do much of the damage to homes, having roofs in good repair and some common sense they are not really something people need to lose sleep over.

For a big part with cable TV and the media they have become over blown media events. I have lived in Florida for over 60 years and they just don't scare me at all. Every time we have an event all you have to do is drive around and see all the damage that didn't have to happen afterwards. Last one I saw a car with a Ficus tree sitting on it. What a shock, not only shoud the tree have been trimmed, what dope would park their car under one in a storm.
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Old 05-24-2010, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Orlando
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Hurricanes are not as predictable as one hopes. I had some technicians ( when I was inthe telecom world) shceduled to be ion Miami when a huge hurricane was coming to FL. so in my effort to protect them I sent them to North Carolina... can ya guess where the hurricane hit? you got it...NC...

OS running doesn't always pay off. If I were in Melbourne and a cat 5 was coming to shore there. I'd grab all I could pack in the car, photo the rest, and drive to Atlanta....

I was in the one that hit Cocoa in the 60's and we just came off the island. all was fine.
I was in the middle of Charlie when it hit here in Orlando, francis, and jean too... I was fine through them all. it did have 10 days of no power, a home with no shingles (makes the rain come in) and there were no restaurants or grocers open... it wasnt pretty. the after math was worse than the storm.

there was a 44 year gap between those storms so Im not really spending any time thinking more are coming. I figure we are good for another 39 years or so.
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Old 05-24-2010, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Miami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjthompson View Post
So, basically, it's advantageous to not be in a flood/surge zone, but other than that it doesn't really matter? Whether we are 5 miles or 100 miles from the coast may not make any difference...it'll just depend on the hurricane?
Exactly, It depends on the hurricane and how large it is. Being inland you will not have the threat of flooding most likely, though there are areas inland that can flood in a hurricane, you can check the hurricane zone map if there are any in your area. Miami-Dade has one of these areas out west.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mango23 View Post
You personally saw this?
What was the cat 5 you went through?
I went through Andrew, the northern eye wall of the storm actually came over my house. I didn't see the 2x4 actually being blown in to the palm, but remember seeing it after the storm many of times. Here is a link to it 2x4 Royal Palm (http://www.tropmet.com/gallery/hurricane/gal_1992_andrew.htm - broken link) Friends of mine lived down the street from it.
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Old 05-25-2010, 09:15 PM
 
2,076 posts, read 2,645,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjthompson View Post
If we lived in a coastal town that was protected by a barrier island, such as West Melbourne, Palm Bay, Titusville, etc. would we need to evacuate when a hurricane hit?

If you're not on an island or within a couple blocks of the ocean, how much trouble are hurricanes? Do you usually just ride them out and then deal with any wind or rain damage? I'm guessing any near hurricane = power outages, too, even inland?

I have some first hand experience with Hurricanes that hit NC...there most of the damage usually happened very close to the ocean, due to the storm surge. Once you got a bit inland, you were probably OK, unless your home was poorly built or you had the bad luck of getting a tree blown over on top of it or catching a spin-off tornado. Is it about the same in FL?

Depends on where and what you live in in those towns. If close to the river , the water can be 3-4 feet deep a block or more from the river. I am from Brevard county, Do a search of Hurricane Jeanne and Frances from 2004. Even inland we were tarp city. During and after the hurricane you usually end up with heavy rains and flooding in low lying areas.
We were without power for over a week in 3 of the huricanes and where we live now that even means without water if you have a well.
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Old 06-07-2010, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Central Florida
75 posts, read 123,054 times
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Default hurricanes

Hello, I've lived in the PB/Melb area for a long time, and I think that you will find, just as living in NC, that the more you are prepared, the less chance you have of anything going horribly wrong.

Would you need to evacuate before every hurricane? No. But in Brevard Co., if the idea of flooding and evacuating are a bit frightening, just stay west of the Indian River. The main coast does get damage, but it isn't quite so severe. Plus, while evacuating, all 7 of the bridges become packed with everyone leaving at the same time. And for flooding, it more depends on your particular neighboorhood, and if the streets have drains for the water to go. Getting a house a bit elevated up can be a big help as well.

I'm sure you already agree that having a good solid roof is essential. During the 2004 hurricane season after having several major hurricanes come through Fl, roofing companies from out west came here to cash in. I'm not familiar with other areas, but many homes in the PB/Melb area were handled by these roofing companies who came in and did horrible jobs. My friend's roof tiles were put on upside down! Many of them were fixed to handle the drier climate of the west, not humid Florida. If your going to buy a home, PLEASE get the roof inspected by a good company beforehand. It could save you 1000's.

As for riding them out, yes, most people just stay in their homes. Only hurricane Floyd had me and my family evacuating. It was a category 5, projected to hit the south Brevard, north Indian River Counties...and thankfully it went northward instead and missed Florida. Hurricanes usually just through a bunch of roof tiles and branches everywhere (along with city-wide not-working traffic lights). Just carry the typical equipment that your used to keeping in NC. Flashlights, canned food, gas in your car, clean water, batteries, a radio...etc. Plus, generators are a big plus if you can afford them.

As for power outages...it's a statewide thing. Seriously. Even central Fl is without power for a while, just not as long. There were many hurricanes in PB that had us out of power for 2 - 3 weeks, while most of Orlando only waited a week. I think you will for the most part find it similar to NC. Check your home before you buy it, and either have shutters or window-shaped ply-wood handy just in case - ready to board up. Keep nails, power drills, plywood, and the tools to cut down certain lose tree branches before hurricane comes. Make sure you don't have a large tree that could fall on your house from westward wind....all in all, I don't think hurricanes should be a reason to move/not move to this area. I would find the falling economy a much more serious problem to think about.

Last edited by annagurl333; 06-07-2010 at 09:28 PM..
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