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Old 01-26-2013, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Northeastern US
14,070 posts, read 8,576,448 times
Reputation: 6006

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I have understood it mainly as attachment to particular outcomes. An inability to allow life be as it is, but always attempting to control and direct it to preconceived ends. An inability to let life flow through and around you. Inflexibly viewing life as belonging to you and therefore requiring it to serve your ends.

This is subtle to grasp because it's counterintuitive to think you could have legitimate preferences and goals and yet not hold to them with a death-grip. I struggle with it personally. I want less stress, more ease, more sex, better health, and a bunch of stuff that I don't have and don't have any prospects for real change anytime soon. As you get toward the last third of your life it becomes both easier and harder to let go. Easier because you have less and less time and energy to make things happen anyway; harder because you have to reconcile with the fact that some things are never going to be for you.

This is why I think attachment to particular outcomes encompasses everything that's been discussed in this thread: attachment to ego, attachement to possessions, etc. All faux security.
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Old 01-29-2013, 10:37 AM
 
152 posts, read 117,124 times
Reputation: 48
We are all born Free( our minds are free) then we grow and we are taught by our families/schools/surroundings..religions etc.. we are taught what life is "about" we becoem attached to things,, but these things are not who we are.. we are Free , we were born free, its our attachments to conditions( in the mind) that make us not see life as a gift ,each moment is not embraced as new.. wee judge everything based on what we were taught..

But what we are taught is not who we are.. we are Life beyond waht we are taught or waht we learn etc..
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Old 01-29-2013, 11:02 PM
 
Location: City-Data Forum
6,930 posts, read 4,307,305 times
Reputation: 1157
Quote:
Originally Posted by nezlie View Post
The Buddha is said to have talked about attachment being the cause for suffering. What did he mean? What is attachment?
attachment to suffering?
He could have meant that attachment to "mental anguish" was the cause of "strictly human/psychological" suffering.
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Not.here
2,828 posts, read 3,448,712 times
Reputation: 2347
Thanks LT! As I read all the replies on here, I see how everyone's touched on the idea of attachment and I think that "all of the above" certainly applies.

I wanted to see what, if anything, Brad Warner (Soto zen priest) had to say on it, and I found a quote on this journal. Some people don't care for Brad's direct way of expressing himself...... they say he's too in-your-face..... but I've always liked his style. I'll let you check it out here....

Buddhism | Non-Attachment | Brad Warner ę Rio Guzman's Journal
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Old 02-08-2013, 07:48 AM
 
152 posts, read 117,124 times
Reputation: 48
some time has passed but you are still here, the same as you were before.
soothing , comforting, lacking nothing.
your voice so peaceful, gently speaking to my heart.
I went away , got carried away, now I returned to find you here waiting,
patiently with a smiling soul, knowing that I would return.
lighter than before , you sent me out to be cleansed , layers peeled away,
clutter of the mind no longer a barrier between u and I.
PEACE... your wisdom explain all things that my mind tried to reason.
it touches my heart and shows it all the mysteries of this world.
returning to you is returning Home.
hard to believe that I would even consider leaving,
but knowing that it was a necessary part of my journey to return home.
so delicious to sit with you in stillness, there is no place I'd rather be.
effortless surrender to u,
your arms rap around my soul and comfort me. all fears disappear
there is no where else I'd rather be.
my mind at peace present here with you.

you and I .. is no separation.. one is who we are..I am who I was seeking .
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:18 AM
 
11,685 posts, read 13,110,015 times
Reputation: 30982
Quote:
Originally Posted by nezlie View Post
Thanks LT! As I read all the replies on here, I see how everyone's touched on the idea of attachment and I think that "all of the above" certainly applies.

I wanted to see what, if anything, Brad Warner (Soto zen priest) had to say on it, and I found a quote on this journal. Some people don't care for Brad's direct way of expressing himself...... they say he's too in-your-face..... but I've always liked his style. I'll let you check it out here....

Buddhism | Non-Attachment | Brad Warner ę Rio Guzman's Journal
I think the gist of the Warner article makes sense. I have felt that it was those outside of Buddhist practice who made this mistake in what non-attachement means in Buddhism.

But, I did find the following assertion puzzling:

"The donít-give-a-**** attitude cultivated by far too many who proudly label themselves Buddhists is one of those things that people who dislike Buddhism always use to trash it."

I was exposed to various American Buddhist environments from about 1987 until I emigrated in 2000, and I can remember nothing like what he has found in "far too many" American Buddhists. I lived in NYC, perhaps it is a regional thing in U.S. Buddhism. Is that possible? Or is this perhaps a development in the period since I left.

And just for the record: I do not think all people who call themselves Buddhist are living saints.

The only generalization I would be inclined to make based on personal observation and reading the writings of various American Buddhists is that Zen - perhaps more especially in the Rinzai tradition, seemed to attract American men with excessive macho-crotcho attitude, whose Zen looked and sounded like a game of spiritual athleticism. Peter Matthieson's Nine-Heading Dragon River diaries struck me as the saga of the rise-implosion-and humanizing of just one of this type.
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Not.here
2,828 posts, read 3,448,712 times
Reputation: 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
But, I did find the following assertion puzzling:

"The donít-give-a-**** attitude cultivated by far too many who proudly label themselves Buddhists is one of those things that people who dislike Buddhism always use to trash it."

I was exposed to various American Buddhist environments from about 1987 until I emigrated in 2000, and I can remember nothing like what he has found in "far too many" American Buddhists. I lived in NYC, perhaps it is a regional thing in U.S. Buddhism. Is that possible? Or is this perhaps a development in the period since I left.

And just for the record: I do not think all people who call themselves Buddhist are living saints.

The only generalization I would be inclined to make based on personal observation and reading the writings of various American Buddhists is that Zen - perhaps more especially in the Rinzai tradition, seemed to attract American men with excessive macho-crotcho attitude, whose Zen looked and sounded like a game of spiritual athleticism. Peter Matthieson's Nine-Heading Dragon River diaries struck me as the saga of the rise-implosion-and humanizing of just one of this type.

The statement caught my eye too. I have no idea what he had in mind. Maybe it's about a perception that some non-Buddhists have about Buddhism somehow disconnecting from everyday life with all its inherent problems.... you know, due to the emphasis in Buddhism on inward focusing via meditation and so on. It may be that Brad has encountered some Buddhists that do give off an attitude of being aloof and above the fray. Just guessing.
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Not.here
2,828 posts, read 3,448,712 times
Reputation: 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAM. View Post
We are all born Free( our minds are free) then we grow and we are taught by our families/schools/surroundings..religions etc.. we are taught what life is "about" we becoem attached to things,, but these things are not who we are.. we are Free , we were born free, its our attachments to conditions( in the mind) that make us not see life as a gift ,each moment is not embraced as new.. wee judge everything based on what we were taught..

But what we are taught is not who we are.. we are Life beyond waht we are taught or waht we learn etc..
Yes, and we learn to grasp ideas and things as though they are permanent and absolute and by holding on we think we have found some 'truth.'
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Not.here
2,828 posts, read 3,448,712 times
Reputation: 2347
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAM. View Post
some time has passed but you are still here, the same as you were before.
soothing , comforting, lacking nothing.
your voice so peaceful, gently speaking to my heart.
I went away , got carried away, now I returned to find you here waiting,
patiently with a smiling soul, knowing that I would return.
lighter than before , you sent me out to be cleansed , layers peeled away,
clutter of the mind no longer a barrier between u and I.
PEACE... your wisdom explain all things that my mind tried to reason.
it touches my heart and shows it all the mysteries of this world.
returning to you is returning Home.
hard to believe that I would even consider leaving,
but knowing that it was a necessary part of my journey to return home.
so delicious to sit with you in stillness, there is no place I'd rather be.
effortless surrender to u,
your arms rap around my soul and comfort me. all fears disappear
there is no where else I'd rather be.
my mind at peace present here with you.

you and I .. is no separation.. one is who we are..I am who I was seeking .
If you start writing a blog, I will be a reader.... love your writing.
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Old 02-09-2013, 01:09 PM
 
Location: earth?
7,288 posts, read 10,385,789 times
Reputation: 8956
Attachment is having desire or revulsion, as well as expectations about how things "should be" (as opposed to how they are) - not living in the moment which is breathing in and breathing out and just "being with" whatever arises internally or externally.
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