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Old 11-06-2010, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Hamburg, NY
1,350 posts, read 1,946,560 times
Reputation: 943

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Louisville was listed in the "small towns" (under 50K) list by CNN Money, this year they didn't do a small towns list.

From the CNN Money site ........

Using statistics from data provider Onboard Informatics, we crunched the numbers in order to zero in on America's best small cities for families. (Last year, we looked at small towns, with populations between 8,500 and 50,000.)
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Old 11-06-2010, 10:41 AM
 
726 posts, read 1,200,167 times
Reputation: 385
My point is the list is called "Best Places to Live." Normal people look at the list, city data nerds study the methodology. Buffalo should be thankful the average person doesn't look at the methodology because Buffalo is not one of the most affordable places. Buffalo has horrible weather, horrible taxes, horrible infrastructure, low paying jobs, corrupt politicians, bad food, unhealthy people, bad sports teams. You can turn a blind eye but eventually once you've lived there long enough it'll get to you. Yes housing can be cheap but property taxes will always be there long after you retire, utilities will always need to be paid, and income will always be taxed. House prices are low because no one could afford to pay more. When I bought my house in Buffalo (burbs) I was approved for only $150k when I bought my house out of state I was approved for $290k. My mortgage company (same one I had in NY) told me that when they approve in NY they have to factor in not only current taxes but rising taxes as well.
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Old 11-06-2010, 01:17 PM
 
31,935 posts, read 37,944,619 times
Reputation: 6432
In regards to the last 3 posts, a lot of this has to do with timing. Considering how things are now, a place like Buffalo looks great due to being relatively steady and not having the issues that these "boomtowns" have had.

I also think it is a time now where an area like Buffalo can be appreciated more and can build momentum, as many, if not most places are somewhat of a clean slate in terms of their economies.
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Old 11-06-2010, 01:26 PM
 
31,935 posts, read 37,944,619 times
Reputation: 6432
Quote:
Originally Posted by choosing78 View Post
My point is the list is called "Best Places to Live." Normal people look at the list, city data nerds study the methodology. Buffalo should be thankful the average person doesn't look at the methodology because Buffalo is not one of the most affordable places. Buffalo has horrible weather, horrible taxes, horrible infrastructure, low paying jobs, corrupt politicians, bad food, unhealthy people, bad sports teams. You can turn a blind eye but eventually once you've lived there long enough it'll get to you. Yes housing can be cheap but property taxes will always be there long after you retire, utilities will always need to be paid, and income will always be taxed. House prices are low because no one could afford to pay more. When I bought my house in Buffalo (burbs) I was approved for only $150k when I bought my house out of state I was approved for $290k. My mortgage company (same one I had in NY) told me that when they approve in NY they have to factor in not only current taxes but rising taxes as well.
But happens to people that retire to FL and still have to pay HOA fees? What about getting around without any good public transportation in many of these Sun Belt states? Many of the communities aren't walkable either. Crime tends to be higher and more spread out in many states that people move to as well. Even with the higher housing prices, how much longer would one have to work or seeing how much the appreciation can go up and down, what happens if the place is in a downturn? There's always things to think about and it's just te issues or problems might be different.
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Old 11-06-2010, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Great White North Hills
8,501 posts, read 7,745,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sabredrew View Post
I think Buffalo's biggest problem is the negative attitude of some of its residents. (see above).
Oops, my mistake, thought this was a Pittsburgh thread.
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Old 11-06-2010, 03:42 PM
 
112 posts, read 171,631 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
But happens to people that retire to FL and still have to pay HOA fees? What about getting around without any good public transportation in many of these Sun Belt states? Many of the communities aren't walkable either. Crime tends to be higher and more spread out in many states that people move to as well. Even with the higher housing prices, how much longer would one have to work or seeing how much the appreciation can go up and down, what happens if the place is in a downturn? There's always things to think about and it's just te issues or problems might be different.

Most HOA's fee are no where close to WNY taxes that are going up & up & up .... Also there's alot of benefits that with HOA's fees
Private Swimming pools, lakes stocked with fish that you can go fishing
Water parks with water falls that have slides Golf courses, fitness centers, lighted tennis courts, volleyball, basketball courts etc..... (that are private and keep outsiders out) vs WNY Taxes
were 99.9999 % is going to support welfare & public sectors salaries
benefits, pensions and the other perks
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Old 11-06-2010, 04:51 PM
 
726 posts, read 1,200,167 times
Reputation: 385
a lot of older people (or lazy young people!) appreciate that most HOAs also cover yard maintenance, landscaping, sprinklers/water bills etc. Besides its not like everywhere outside of New York is only HOA communities. You can choose to not live in a community with an HOA but you can't choose one that doesn't have property taxes.
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Old 11-06-2010, 06:48 PM
 
31,935 posts, read 37,944,619 times
Reputation: 6432
Quote:
Originally Posted by choosing78 View Post
a lot of older people (or lazy young people!) appreciate that most HOAs also cover yard maintenance, landscaping, sprinklers/water bills etc. Besides its not like everywhere outside of New York is only HOA communities. You can choose to not live in a community with an HOA but you can't choose one that doesn't have property taxes.
I understand that, but it's not like taxes haven't been going up in other states either. Like it's already been shown, Texas has property taxes that aren't much lower than many parts of NY. I believe that NC increased their taxes as well. So, NY is not alone in that regard.

You also get things from taxes here like quality schools(for the most part), snow removal, trash services, parks and law enforcemant coverage, along with some other things. So, it's not like you aren't getting something for the taxes that people pay.

Also, with legislation that recently passed making it a bit easier to consolidate, if one wants to in terms of services, that also can allow some communities to lower their tax burden on residents.
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Old 11-08-2010, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Rockport Texas from El Paso
2,530 posts, read 4,908,610 times
Reputation: 1355
I was including school taxes in my bill -remember this was a few years ago to make for a fair comparison with Buffalo. Also remember and you don't seem to, that although they are supposed to be appraised at current market value in Texas is almost always less. That way they reduce the protest lines each spring.

In Buffalo when i looked at buildings - many were appraised at way higher than their real market value- even a lot on York Street was appraised at way more than I could eventually sell it for.

Big D you can calculate forever and you seem to have the time for this - but if you OMIT the above, every calculation will be off.

When my house was appraised at $560k or so it had a market value considerably higher - with the recession which proportionally hit our resort area harder than Buffalo (as far as real estate prices as Buffalo did not have the same type of boom/bust speculation we did and did not have as far to fall) the current appraisal on my house may be closer to market- its speculative as people are not buying houses here.
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Old 11-08-2010, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Buffalo
694 posts, read 742,426 times
Reputation: 896
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocean2026 View Post
I was including school taxes in my bill -remember this was a few years ago to make for a fair comparison with Buffalo. Also remember and you don't seem to, that although they are supposed to be appraised at current market value in Texas is almost always less. That way they reduce the protest lines each spring.

In Buffalo when i looked at buildings - many were appraised at way higher than their real market value- even a lot on York Street was appraised at way more than I could eventually sell it for.

Big D you can calculate forever and you seem to have the time for this - but if you OMIT the above, every calculation will be off.

When my house was appraised at $560k or so it had a market value considerably higher - with the recession which proportionally hit our resort area harder than Buffalo (as far as real estate prices as Buffalo did not have the same type of boom/bust speculation we did and did not have as far to fall) the current appraisal on my house may be closer to market- its speculative as people are not buying houses here.

Well Ocean, I generally only take 2-3 min to look up and present facts like these when a post is made that contains sweeping generalizations, is an outright lie or needs correction or context. You apparently have no experience with A) owning a home in Dallas County (appraisals are not suppressed even slightly, nor have they been for the 10 yrs I've owned real estate in DFW) and B) You have not been a homeowner in Buffalo/WNY and don't have anything to contribute to a WNY real estate / tax conversation other than "A listing I looked at a few years ago..."
If you've owned property in Dallas or Buffalo, then your credibility increases in my book. I owned property, paid taxes and lived in WNY for approx 25 yrs of my life, have you? My family has owned a business in Buffalo since the late 70's, has yours?
Just taking a listing or 2 from who knows how many years ago is not an accurate picture of WNY real estate and when broad generalizations are made based on those couple listings from years ago, one has to stop and wonder what your motivation and goal is here... Bashing Buffalo is nothing new, but what's in it for you?
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