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Old 11-14-2014, 02:08 AM
 
1,315 posts, read 3,321,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westchester-buffalo-nyc View Post
Buffalo suburbanites regularly berate the city of Buffalo and try to distance themselves from it. It's sickening, and a great reason to leave this area.

In the NYC area, there is a phenomenon opposite to this. People living 1.5-2hrs away from the city center proudly (although controversially) state they are "from NYC".
good lord ,the bridge and tunnel people trying to pass themselves off as us? Nevah!!! lol

 
Old 11-17-2014, 08:57 AM
 
Location: WNY (NOT NYC for the geographically challenged)
70 posts, read 100,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grdnrman View Post
I think that Syracuse & Rochester & Buffalo are the best Upstate New York State large cities.
They're the ONLY upstate New York large cities
 
Old 11-19-2014, 04:37 AM
 
Location: Where my bills arrive
6,915 posts, read 8,424,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westchester-buffalo-nyc View Post
Buffalo suburbanites regularly berate the city of Buffalo and try to distance themselves from it. It's sickening, and a great reason to leave this area.

In the NYC area, there is a phenomenon opposite to this. People living 1.5-2hrs away from the city center proudly (although controversially) state they are "from NYC".
I believe most people say their from the city because when you tell someone Mahwah or Ardsley they look at you an alien. NYC is a reference everyone can recognize, besides depending on traffic 1.5 hour drive may not even get you out of the Bronx on a bad day...
 
Old 11-21-2014, 09:14 AM
 
695 posts, read 737,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkingElsewhere View Post
I think for the most part Buffalo residents have pride, especially when you say you're from another city in New York. Now if you ask a Buffalo resident about their pride in front of someone from maybe San Diego, then they might act more berate.

It's good Buffalo people have pride. Despite it's problems, it is the best city in New York after NYC. I enjoyed living in Buffalo more than living in Albany.
Except for a really good Italian restaurant I found (Lombardo's), I was not impressed with Albany. If it weren't for the state capitol and government buildings, it would seem even worse. I had to go to Albany to get sworn into the state bar . . . I couldn't wait to leave.

Last edited by JohnnyDenver; 11-21-2014 at 09:14 AM.. Reason: spelling
 
Old 11-21-2014, 09:52 AM
 
10 posts, read 8,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VA Yankee View Post
I believe most people say their from the city because when you tell someone Mahwah or Ardsley they look at you an alien. NYC is a reference everyone can recognize, besides depending on traffic 1.5 hour drive may not even get you out of the Bronx on a bad day...
Yeah that's a good point, but also shows NYC-area residents have some pride in what they feel is their city (that's a good thing... not criticizing).

Here in Amherst, my coworkers explain to customers around the country that we are located in "Amherst, a suburb of Buffalo" or even better "Amherst, in western new york". Some criticize Amherst and other first ring suburbs for being too close to "the city" (which is kind of a curse word here). Sad situation.
 
Old 11-21-2014, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Durham
660 posts, read 739,459 times
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Default It Depends! :-)

I think it's too broad a generalization of a people, a region and of a subjective subject!

I believe that people can love and hate different aspects of a place, but to just say you completely love some place or completely hate it would have to be untrue. I never believe in the extremes.

Just like people, every place has things that some will perceive as great, while others won't.

I grew up in Pennsylvania, but moved here after 13 years in Seattle, WA when I accepted a job at a university in WNY. There are several things I love about Buffalo; the history, the architecture, the walkable neighborhoods in the city itself. There are things I don't like, too; the long winters and weather in general, the high taxes, the poor infrastructure, the lack of proximity to the ocean and the lack of jobs.

Thus, after 7 years I'm leaving in early 2015.

Overall I have found that many people here are RABIDLY LOYAL to Buffalo; the "we love it" types who can't generally acknowledge that the area has had, still has, and will continue to have major issues that revolve around the economy, racism, politics, a poor infrastructure, and nepotism. This saddens me because I think, in order to grow, change and innovate, people need to engage in realistic critical thinking that allows them to address the issues they and/or their region are facing with open eyes and hearts. Simply saying "We Love Buffalo" isn't enough to create change.

And yes, this can be done while still being proud to call a place home.

Actually, I fully expect that some of them will attack me for posting anything critical about Buffalo at all.

To them I'll say you are better off getting out in the community and creating change than wasting your time trying to refute anything I might have said that you didn't like.
 
Old 11-21-2014, 10:24 AM
 
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There are many rabidly loyal to the Buffalo area (family ties, comfortable life... fair enough) and sports teams, but not really the city itself. There are 100s of cities with nice enough suburbs, so I find this loyalty, in the absence of any interest in the city center, to be a bit odd. City loyalists do exist (See buffalorising)... but appear to be outnumbered by the suburb lovers
 
Old 11-22-2014, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Durham
660 posts, read 739,459 times
Reputation: 509
Default Suburbs

And the suburbs here are HORRIBLE . . . tons of traffic, insane taxes in many areas, and all strip malls or sad looking housing developments.

Of course, thr same could be said about suburbs in a lot of places.


Quote:
Originally Posted by westchester-buffalo-nyc View Post
There are many rabidly loyal to the Buffalo area (family ties, comfortable life... fair enough) and sports teams, but not really the city itself. There are 100s of cities with nice enough suburbs, so I find this loyalty, in the absence of any interest in the city center, to be a bit odd. City loyalists do exist (See buffalorising)... but appear to be outnumbered by the suburb lovers
 
Old 11-23-2014, 01:55 PM
 
4,135 posts, read 8,961,385 times
Reputation: 2672
Quote:
Originally Posted by westchester-buffalo-nyc View Post
Yeah that's a good point, but also shows NYC-area residents have some pride in what they feel is their city (that's a good thing... not criticizing).

Here in Amherst, my coworkers explain to customers around the country that we are located in "Amherst, a suburb of Buffalo" or even better "Amherst, in western new york". Some criticize Amherst and other first ring suburbs for being too close to "the city" (which is kind of a curse word here). Sad situation.
Its not a sad situation. It is ignorance. People hear "New York" -- and if they aren't from the state, they automatically think NYC-LI-Westchester. What would you do if you called another state you had no knowledge of? You automatically think of the biggest cities!

I often get "Lancaster? Thought that was in PA?" and I explain I am about 20 miles east of Buffalo NY toward Rochester. People know Buffalo, they know Rochester, they know Albany. You have to explain where you are in relation to a large city if you are not talking about "New Yawk City".

I have pride in this area. That's why , after coming for college in the 1960s, I stayed. [Your "pride in NYC" is merely snobby.]
 
Old 11-23-2014, 02:03 PM
 
4,135 posts, read 8,961,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Professor46 View Post
And the suburbs here are HORRIBLE . . . tons of traffic, insane taxes in many areas, and all strip malls or sad looking housing developments.

Of course, thr same could be said about suburbs in a lot of places.
Where I live? Heaven! Little traffic ( spring and fall, we pull over for farm equipment or hay wagons), houses? Its all farmhouses and ranches (those mostly built by those of us in our 60s or earlier by our parents after WWII) , no strip malls here (I am 5 miles east or west to get to a village, the strip plazas are food stores & the PO & Tractor Supply out toward Alden... but you do get the tacky developments and plazas in toward the southeast of Lancaster or across Transit in Cheektowaga).... and my taxes are far from insane. ( one reason? We are on septic, not sewer) Oh, and we are on 4 acres. And I am all the way out in a suburb: Lancaster.
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