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Old 03-21-2017, 09:26 AM
 
Location: The City of Buffalo!
937 posts, read 418,249 times
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From the Buffalo News By Karen Robinson Tue, Mar 21, 2017;

All from only three companies in 2002...........

Quote:
The number of companies on the 120-acre Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus has grown to more than 150, according to the non-profit organization that oversees the campus.

In 2002, when the campus was in its infancy, there were three companies.

Companies counted by the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus Inc. include those located in its entrepreneurial hub; University at Buffalo's Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences; UB Gateway; Hauptman-Woodward Research Institute; Conventus; 73 High St. and 847 Main St. It also includes services providers and tenants that have offices within one of the buildings on campus but may be headquartered elsewhere.

The campus is a diverse mix of companies and not solely focused on health care and life sciences. Social impact and technological-based companies also are on the uptick, along with a major push of those interested in starting or growing a business.

The number of people working on the Medical Campus will expand grow this fall when UB's Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences opens to faculty and then in January to students. Women's & Children's Hospital of Buffalo operations will move to the new John R. Oishei Children's Hospital in November.

The state recently awarded $625,000 to the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus to expand its business development program. In the past year, there has been $750 million of investment and 700 construction workers on the campus, according to Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus Inc.
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Old 03-21-2017, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
707 posts, read 391,722 times
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Good to hear.
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Old 03-24-2017, 10:28 AM
 
56,263 posts, read 80,427,244 times
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Nice and those companies could cause more spinoff companies to be formed in the area/city as well.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 03-24-2017 at 11:05 AM..
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Old 05-18-2017, 09:45 AM
 
Location: The City of Buffalo!
937 posts, read 418,249 times
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Default Art to give children 'healing and peace' in new Oishei Hospital

Children's Hospital which was located on the middle West Side for decades is now in the Medical Campus.

Form the Buffalo News:
Quote:
By Karen Robinson Thu, May 18, 2017

Patients at the John R. Oishei Children's Hospital will see a new art collection when the 12-story facility opens on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus in November. Each floor of the hospital will have art to illustrate a distinct theme. The facility is still acquiring various pieces from artists who are either creating something new or featuring something they have already created. "We will have a set of signature art on each floor that will set the theme on the floor," said Erin Sassone, Kaleida Health senior marketing associate. "It will be very nice for patients to have fun things to look at. It's mainly to bring a sense of healing and peace."

Signature artwork will be in place on each floor when the hospital opens. Other art pieces will continue to be added after its fall opening. Burchfield Penney Art Center Associate Director and Chief Curator Scott Propeack has volunteered his time to head the Oishei art project, which includes relationships with many longstanding cultural institutions.
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Old 05-18-2017, 09:54 AM
 
Location: The City of Buffalo!
937 posts, read 418,249 times
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Default Kaleida hopes to expand food trucks on Medical Campus

It seems you don't have to go far in the city to find a Food Truck in the summer.

From the Buffalo News;
Quote:
By Karen Robinson Wed, May 3, 2017

Institutions on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus are looking to eventually create their own version of a massive food truck experience to diversify eating options for campus workers and the public – mirroring the widely successful Food Truck Tuesdays in Larkinville. That may not happen for a long time – given the ongoing construction on campus – but there's a strong push behind the scenes to ramp up the daily presence of food trucks throughout the 120-acre campus beyond the handful of trucks there on a typical day.

Kaleida Health – which operates Buffalo General Medical Center, the new John R. Oishei Children's Hospital that will open in November and Gates Vascular Institute – is working with Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus Inc. to expand food truck options, said Kaleida Health spokesman Michael P. Hughes. One of the things being looked at for this summer season is creating multiple-day visits for food trucks in more centrally located sections of campus that would not conflict with ongoing construction, Hughes said Tuesday. "We have talked to a number of food truck vendors for their availability this summer."

"As part of the growth of the Kaleida footprint on the campus, this is a natural amenity we're trying to expand on the campus," Hughes said. "The food trucks are very popular in the community and we receive a lot of requests from our employees and food truck vendors to leverage the growth tied to the campus. It's capitalizing on the popularity of food trucks."

While it's uncertain when the long-term vision of a food truck rodeo might occur because of all the construction on campus, Hughes said there is a strong interest in offering more eating amenities to workers. The overall popularity of food trucks is a natural fit, said Hughes, noting the success they have had at Larkin, where Kaleida's back office operations are based. "We'd like to have that type of experience introduced this summer," Hughes said, noting, however, that part of the biggest challenge is working around construction. "Construction may be an impediment. But we want to increase food truck availability this summer, and then have a larger, long-range plan so we can create a Food Truck Tuesday similar to the Larkin Building. It's a very popular concept in the community."

Food trucks are on the Medical Campus weekdays in the area of Elm and Virginia streets in the Roswell Park section of campus. They generally operate on a set schedule at different spots, but it is not actively coordinated by BNMC. "We want to support our local restaurants, as well as food trucks, and give those on campus, lots of options," said BNMC spokesperson Susan Kirkpatrick. "We are supportive of food trucks. We would be happy to see additional trucks join in and it would be nice to have variety and different types of trucks." The food trucks are on campus daily and it's up to food trucks where they will be and when, she said. "We encourage employees to check social media for their favorite food trucks."

Lomo Lomo food truck co-owner Sam Geyer is excited about ramping up food truck activity on the Medical Campus. In its second season on campus, Lomo Lomo is looking to extend its Friday lunch hours on campus until 3 or 4 p.m. in June. "We've been talking about staying a little later til 3 or 4 because it's so big and people have later lunch breaks. It's not just doctors, but nurses and patients. Everyone goes there at some point." said Geyer, whose trucks are at Elm and Virginia. "I learned Roswell is a good spot to be."

Beyond summer, Geyer said Lomo Lomo, which serves food influenced by South American and Asian flavors, will consider staying in the fall, as well as two days a week in the winter, offering soups. "I think the food truck community would be happy with more," Geyer said. "It's really hard for a food truck to pull up in other areas of the city. Roswell and the Medical Campus are one of those areas where there's always people walking around and it's one of the few areas of the city where you feel like a real, traditional food truck where you can open up on a street and serve people directly.
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Old 05-18-2017, 09:59 AM
 
Location: The City of Buffalo!
937 posts, read 418,249 times
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A previous related article from the News;

Quote:
By Karen Robinson Thu, Apr 13, 2017

Jason Agro saw big potential when he opened up a deli on the edge of the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus four years ago. The numbers, after all, are impressive. Companies with a presence in the 120-acre neighborhood have grown from three in 2002 to 150 today. By next year, 15,000 people are expected to work on campus as a new children’s hospital and medical school open.

But turning those employees and patients into customers has been a challenge for some restaurant owners and service businesses that hope to build on the growth. “Everyone thinks you’ll be rich instantly,” said Agro, who opened the Twisted Pickle on the eastern edge of the campus by Roswell Park Cancer Institute. “It turns out to be more of a marathon than the sprint I thought it would be.” Agro is part of a crop of new restaurant owners that see potential in the growing number of people working on the Medical Campus, where more than $1 billion of development and investments have turned a once-dead area into a neighborhood dominated by doctors and patients, medical researchers and entrepreneurs.

The boom in development helped rescue the storied Ulrich’s Tavern from the brink of death nearly three years ago after new owners invested in the 1868 bar. Still, some merchants are holding out for better days. They see hope in the opening of the new John R. Oishei Children’s Hospital and the move of the University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences later this year.

“It’s unpredictable right now,” said Hamada Saleh, who targeted the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus when he opened up Caffeology coffee shop a block away on Allen Street two years ago. “I think the medical school will make it more consistent.” To be sure, restaurants are a notoriously difficult business to start, with studies showing a third of new restaurants fail in the first year.

And the Medical Campus has attracted new investment in adjacent neighborhoods, where developers have bought up properties and proposed hundreds of new apartments in the vacant Trico complex and other buildings. Matthew Enstice, president and CEO of Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus Inc., the nonprofit organization that coordinates services on campus, said it’s tough to pin down the amount of anticipated spinoff business generated by the growing campus. “I don’t know we’ve been able to quantify this,” Enstice said. “But with the medical school coming down, if the businesses can just hold on, I believe that’s when they’ll start to see a change. I believe it’s going to be a positive uptick.”

Enstice said UB’s new medical school, slated to fully be open by January, should punch a significant impact – more so than a hospital, where doctors and other medical staff are on tight schedules that don’t easily allow for long lunch breaks. “With the medical school, they don’t have to get back to surgery,” he said. “I think the medical school is the game changer.”

Waiting on the medical school
Saleh, 34, is also waiting for the medical school to open. He moved here from Milford, Conn., opening Caffeology coffee bistro at the corner of Allen and North Pearl streets – a short block from where the medical school building is under construction at Main and Allen streets. Some days are better than others. A walk along the western edge of campus in the immediate Main Street perimeter yields a half dozen food establishments and an occasional bar amid vacant storefronts advertised by developers looking to lease space.

A straight shot down Allen Street leads to a smattering of retail and restaurants that stretch for several blocks. “I thought, let’s win the neighborhood customers and then the campus workers will come,” said Saleh, who holds a master’s degree in applied economics from UB. He signed a five-year lease to run the cafe with five employees. “My passion was always coffee. I wanted Allen Street, and I knew the Medical Campus was coming.”

He had such high hopes when he opened that he kept his doors open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. But after a few months, Saleh realized it wasn’t worth it. Now, the cafe opens at 7 a.m. and closes at 6 p.m. weekdays, with weekend hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. A year and a half later, “it’s still hit or miss,” Saleh said, with a line out the door some mornings and just a customer trickle on other days.

John Papp, a server at Giacobbi’s Cucina Citta that opened in Allentown last June, is measured in his thinking of what may come. “The hope is that when all of that finishes and the UB medical school, that that will bring a huge amount of business and a flow up and down Allen Street,” he said. “I think we will see some business from it, but I don’t think it will be Manhattan-style.”

Still, some have seen success.
A few blocks away, Ulrich’s, a tavern that dates to 1868, has found new life on the doorstep of the booming Medical Campus. Saved from the brink of financial woes, the tavern at the corner of Ellicott and Virginia streets is a lure for patients and families, as well as employees on campus.

“It was very much struggling and was just sitting there, and there was talk of making it a parking area, if you can believe it,” said owner Thomas Eoannou, who invested substantially to restore the building after buying it in 2014. “I fell in love with the building, and it was such a part of the city’s history. It was literally having its last breath, but over the past year, the business has picked up dramatically.” Bartender Chris Seymour estimated that probably 80 percent of the tavern’s lunch crowd is driven by the Medical Campus.

“People come to celebrate if they go into remission,” said Seymour, who recalled a couple who came to lunch regularly for two years while the husband was treated for cancer. Recently, he said, they came in for a celebratory beer. “He was cancer-free.”

Bringing lunch to the workers
But building service businesses and restaurants on the growth of the Medical Campus, where many health care workers have tight schedules and short lunch breaks, may require more creativity. Some business owners are cooking up ways to take their food directly to campus workers in food trucks, catering or delivery services.

Patrick Ryan, owner of Fat Bob’s Smokehouse, an Allentown staple, hopes staff at the Conventus medical and research building and UB’s medical school will find their way to the barbecue hot spot. Ryan believes additional traffic will likely come from medical students and staff living in the neighborhood as more apartments are renovated and rented. Ryan and others, though, noted that many employees at Roswell and Buffalo General Medical Center have been coming to work there for years and “come in on the 33, get in their cars and go home.” “There’s that routine,” Ryan said.

Ryan and his team are starting to brainstorm ways to get food to campus workers, and last year, Fat Bob’s saw an uptick in in its takeout business, although Ryan said it’s tough to pin down how much is due to the Medical Campus. “We’re still working up a game plan,” Ryan said. “The idea is instead of waiting for them to come to us, how do we get to them?”
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Old 06-01-2017, 12:37 PM
 
Location: The City of Buffalo!
937 posts, read 418,249 times
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Default Trico building finally sold; apartments, hotel envisioned

Here I thought this happened some time back and was wondering why something visible hasn't happened yet.
From the Buffalo News:

Quote:
By Jonathan D. Epstein Wed, May 31, 2017

After more than two years of delays, Krog Corp. has completed its purchase of the mammoth Trico Products Corp. building on Washington Street, enabling the firm to begin its $80 million redevelopment of the former factory into apartments, a hotel and commercial space. Orchard Park-based Krog on Wednesday morning paid $35,000 to acquire the seven-story complex from the Buffalo Brownfield Restoration Corp., an arm of the city's Buffalo Urban Development Corp. that has owned the 617,000-square-foot facility at 791 Washington St. for more than a decade. "I am very proud to say that the city and its economic development agency no longer owns this building," said Buffalo Mayor Byron W. Brown.

The closing was expected but repeatedly put off over the last 24 months as Peter Krog and his team lined up local, state and federal approvals, along with a complicated stream of financing. The project's funding includes historic and brownfield tax credits from the state and federal governments, as well as tax breaks through the Erie County Industrial Development Agency. The developer has been working in the building for six months on a state-supervised asbestos remediation under the state's Brownfield Cleanup Program, and still has to clean up mold and other environmental issues from years of decay and water damage. Plans call for completion and occupancy by late 2018.

Wednesday's purchase marks a significant milestone in the city's effort to preserve the building's history and bring it back to life. Originally home to the windshield wiper manufacturer founded by John R. Oishei, the complex was built in five stages between 1880 and 1954. It occupies almost an entire city block between Washington and Ellicott streets, north of Goodell Street, on the edge of the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus. "We have inherited many legacy buildings in the City of Buffalo and to preserve and redevelop those legacy buildings is no easy task," Brown said. "Ten years of providing stewardship over the Trico Building was a long time, but a necessary time to get to the point where today we are able to transfer it to a developer."

The city bought the building in 2007 in anticipation of redevelopment and reuse by Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus Inc. The BNMC plan never moved forward, and its designated-developer agreement expired in December 2013. Two months later, Krog agreed to buy it. "It's been a long hard struggle. It's not an easy project. If it was an easy project, a lot of other people would have taken it on a long time ago," said Krog, a developer and engineer. "Fortunately, we've had the fortitude to be able to stay with it and see it to fruition, and now it's a big milestone for us to be closing on the property today and now definitely we'll be moving ahead full speed."

Krog, which has partnered with Buffalo-based Hart Hotels Inc. on the project, plans to carve an atrium into the building for more daylight. Crews will demolish about 120,000 square feet of the building along Ellicott Street as part of the redevelopment, reducing the total building size to just under 500,000 square feet. They will rebuild three top floors to link both sides and create a dramatic entry for car traffic into an interior courtyard. "When we get through with it, it'll look like a brand-new building," Krog said.

The project will feature a 120-room extended-stay hotel operated by Hart. There's also as many as 185 studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom loft-style, market-rate apartments, ranging in size from 500 to 1,200 square feet. The plans also call for 35,000 square feet of Class A office space for a high-tech anchor tenant, 86,000 square feet of additional commercial space and 12,000 square feet of retail or food and beverage space. Tenants have not yet been identified, Krog said. The building will also include 230 interior parking spaces, with another 100 spaces available through an agreement with the Medical Campus.

The Buffalo Public Schools had planned to put a second campus of its successful Emerson School of Hospitality into the Trico complex, in 85,000 square feet, but pulled out late last year because of the delays. Krog increased the number of apartments and added 30,000 square feet of office space to fill out the plan. "If anybody could pull off a project at this location, it's Peter Krog," Brown said.

Despite the challenges, Krog said he doesn't regret taking on the building. "This has been probably one of the most difficult projects that we've worked on," Krog said. "It's a challenge, to prove that I can do it."
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Old 06-16-2017, 11:29 AM
 
Location: The City of Buffalo!
937 posts, read 418,249 times
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Default UB medical school prepares for more students

From the Buffalo News;
Quote:
By Karen Robinson Fri, Jun 9, 2017

The University at Buffalo's new medical school building will open its doors to more students.

The incoming class at UB's Jacobs School of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences will increase by 25 percent to 180 students. Over four years, the medical school will grow to 720 medical students. The new building, under construction at Main and Allen streets on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, has been designed to accommodate the increase.

Undergraduates will continue taking courses on University at Buffalo's South campus, largely taught in Dieffendorf Hall, where there are classrooms large enough to hold 300 or more students.

In addition to the medical students, the medical school has 133 Ph.D. students, 71 master's degree students and more than 800 residents, who are already doctors and are training at area hospitals and labs. Nearly 2,000 faculty, staff and students will be based at the Medical Campus by January.
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Old 07-01-2017, 06:07 AM
 
Location: The City of Buffalo!
937 posts, read 418,249 times
Reputation: 430
Default Childerens Hospital

From the Buffalo news;

Quote:
Oishei Children's Hospital nears completion
By Henry L. Davis Updated June 29, 2017

Construction of the new John R. Oishei Children’s Hospital is more than 90 percent complete and remains on schedule to open in November, Kaleida Health officials said Thursday.

Interior construction of the new $270 million facility on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, including installation and testing of the mechanical and electrical systems, is nearly complete. Ground was broken in October 2014 and the exterior completed in late 2016. Recent construction milestones include the completion all operating rooms, elevators and floors eight through 12, where the mother-baby unit, pediatric intensive-care unit, medical-surgical units and hematology/oncology unit reside.

“Now that the interior is nearly complete, it is exciting to see the countless hours of time and effort poured into creating a one-of-a-kind, child-friendly space finally take shape,” Allegra Jaros, president of Women & Children’s Hospital, said in a statement. Turner Construction Co. is the construction manager for the project. The construction status report also noted that all sidewalks, landscaping, driveways and Epoxy floors are 90 percent complete; and the first floor, including main lobby and emergency department lobby spaces, is 85 percent complete.

Upcoming milestones include completion and certification of the helipad in July, the installation of the roof garden, and the removal of the trailers and site fencing in August.
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Old 07-12-2017, 07:03 AM
 
Location: The City of Buffalo!
937 posts, read 418,249 times
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Default Medical Campus garden to offer free workshops

From the Buffalo News;
Quote:
By Karen Robinson | July 7, 2017

Gardening workshops and crop education advice will be on tap at Pelion Garden at City Honors School on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus on Thursdays throughout the remaining summer months. The garden, at 206 Best St., will host the event from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursdays in July and through August, except for Aug. 10, when one will not be held.

The free workshops, organized by the BNMC Inc., focus on gardening and crop education for medical campus employees and community members. Upcoming topics include pest control, healthy soil, pollinator buffets, rain gardens, troubleshooting tomatoes and making sauce, edible flowers, creative container gardening, prepping and building crop gardens and growing vegetables through the Buffalo winter.
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