U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Business
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-11-2011, 04:55 PM
 
326 posts, read 671,765 times
Reputation: 188

Advertisements

can you list some please?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-14-2011, 09:52 AM
 
Location: GA
1,242 posts, read 1,434,651 times
Reputation: 1263
The business administration degree allows many doors to open. What I would suggest is that you identify 3 career fields that you want to go into and taylor your resume for that. Did you have an emphasis in your business administration field like accounting/finance/marketing/project managementment etc? If you want to concentrate your efforts on a specific field it might help to get a certificate to accompany your degree so employers know you are prepared to enter that field. Certificates could be project management, public relations, marketing, human resources, etc.
Sales, Insurance Claims, Finance (wells fargo is hiring a lot of people), and accounting are some fields you should be able to explore.
Good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2011, 05:21 PM
 
326 posts, read 671,765 times
Reputation: 188
Thanks
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2011, 07:16 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
25,829 posts, read 44,578,886 times
Reputation: 23349
That is a good general degree that combined with some experience will
help get a lot of different kinds of jobs. A lot of jobs will specify a degree in something "or business". My daughter has that degree and is currently a research manager at a consulting firm, but worked in various other lower level jobs for about 6 years before her last promotion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2011, 02:44 PM
 
2,618 posts, read 4,920,501 times
Reputation: 2091
Playing Devil's Advocate here....it's better to specialize in something. A jack of all trades type degree like "business administration" it's a death sentence, but in an economy with 9.5% unemployment rate, companies want people with specific experience and education in a particular and specific field. Try tailoring your resume to those three industries, preferably something you have experience in. I had 4 years sales experience with a track record of success and references from all employers yet it took me 6 months to find another sales job and I could only find one that was in the exact field I had been working in the last 4 years.

I tried to go into Marketing (which I have a degree in) but I found I didn't have experience for even an entry level job (can't imagine how hard it is for recent college grads right now) and I lost out on sales positions outside of my field as well. Times are tough, I know I'm stuck to what I've been doing and there's no much opportunity to try something new. I would just try to figure out your strong suits and experience and go with that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 02:16 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
18,137 posts, read 33,609,250 times
Reputation: 16608
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdubs3201 View Post
Playing Devil's Advocate here....it's better to specialize in something. A jack of all trades type degree like "business administration" it's a death sentence, ...
Agree, any generic degree may set you up as a burger flipper.

Bottom line, get out and EXPERIENCE your chosen field BEFORE wasting time and $$$.

I did a technical apprenticeship WHILE attending engineering school, and found my following career very rich because I was fully competent in each field / which enhanced my performance in each. (BTW: the technical / skills job paid MUCH BETTER (overtime) and I was always employable, and work enjoyable). I wouldn't trade those miserable yrs as a 'grunt' for all the other degrees I hold (just finished another post age 50). I learned a lot about DIVERSITY, as my masters were eastern Europeans who had escaped / fled / immigrated. You learn a new appreciation for 'opportunity' (and freedom)

I had each my kids build houses from scratch while in Jr High, when normal 19th century kids would have been apprentices (they attended FREE college instead of HS paid by the state). They acquired some great skills. I encouraged them to each specialize in a skilled trade in addition to a degree program.

The US EDU is SO backwards compared with the rest of the world. 20 yrs ago while living in Asia, ALL college Sophomores were hired by companies and during jr and senior yr they worked on company projects in conjunction with EDU. Thus when the graduated college, they were trained, educated, and had a job in a field that they were competent to enter the workforce as an asset, and there were no surprises as to expectations.

In the USA, you can spend $xxx,xxx and yrs in EDU, not having a clue it is a field that you can even tolerate; much less be productive and a value to your employer and society.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 04:42 PM
 
16,090 posts, read 34,389,186 times
Reputation: 6215
I agree, internships and working while you are getting your degree are key. I worked at an excavation company with an estimator, an insurance company, the university science library, an oil and gas company and had an internship at a major newspaper. I also dabbled in Real Estate on my own.

As you go through B school you will learn what you like. I didn't really care for Finance, Accounting, Economics, Managment, etc. I was more into Business Law, Marketing (got a Journalism PR/Advertising degree concurrently) Real Estate and Oil and Gas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2011, 08:39 PM
 
4 posts, read 11,381 times
Reputation: 19
Learn a little bit about software usability and become a business consultant/analyst in an IT department. They define business requirements for software projects and typically command a pretty good salary.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Business

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top