U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Business
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-26-2018, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
330 posts, read 927,361 times
Reputation: 252

Advertisements

So I am a dealer for a large national replacement window business. Im about 2 years in and we are on pace to gross about 450k this year. Not too bad but I did think we would be doing better by now. I am doing the usual internet advertising, google SEO, Adwords, Facebook Advertising and some print advertising in local coupon books. I want to step it up.

My question is there is a small building that is for sale on a very high traffic intersection near my current office. The traffic is 10K cars per day. I can afford to buy the building but it is a sizeable chunk of money down and monthly. Would this increase my business substantially? I would put up large signs and have the whole side of the building painted with our logo and slogans.

Opinions?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-26-2018, 11:28 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,025 posts, read 25,829,769 times
Reputation: 39483
Maybe.

Is the building big enough? Is there sufficient parking? How difficult is it to get into and out of the parking lot? What speed is the traffic moving? Is there a stop light at the intersection?

What businesses have been in that location in the past and failed?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2018, 07:44 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,444 posts, read 50,699,085 times
Reputation: 28736
We just replaces all of our windows plus sliding door, 15 in all. The company we used does no advertising other than a sign out front while working, and word of mouth/social media recommendations. In our case it was a neighbor's recommendation then checking online reviews that sold us. If you are doing residential, it seems like a downtown area would not be all that helpful, since most of your customers live in the suburbs. I would never use a business just because I saw their office and signs. Just like I would never vote for someone just because they have signs up all over the place. My suggestion is establishing a relationship with a local small hardware store, and set up a display with a sample of your product. You can even hold a drawing there for a prize such as 5 free windows, which by filling out the form gives you the chance to call people without violating the "do not call" list.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2018, 08:34 AM
 
770 posts, read 565,342 times
Reputation: 1475
Advertising might have worked 5-10 years ago, but Hemlock is correct. I don't care how big or how much advertising there is. If someone on nextdoor.com says this window company ripped them off, but this other one was much better, thats REAL testimony that is all I care about.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2018, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
330 posts, read 927,361 times
Reputation: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by 191185 View Post
Advertising might have worked 5-10 years ago, .
Really? like advertising is dead? I appreciate the response but dont agree. I also use all the social media sites you refer to like nextdoor, porch, facebook, yelp, angies list, home advisor and more. There are still millions of customers that do not use the internet to shop. Many millions. TV, Direct Mail, Radio its all still relevant to some degree. I do agree the internet is #1 but its not the only way to get customers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2018, 10:20 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,444 posts, read 50,699,085 times
Reputation: 28736
The Direct Marketing Association boasts that direct mail results in a 4.4% response rate. If that is worth the cost for you, go for it. In my opinion, the direct mail which goes in my trash without reading serves to annoy and anger people. When it comes time to buy a product or service I'm less likely to use someone that either spams me with email, or spams me with snail mail. Even more so, I would never use a company that does telephone soliciting. In the case of a high-cost item like window replacements where people are putting up $15,000 or more most homeowners that can afford them are going to be very internet savvy and rely on social media reviews. Even among those making less than $30k/year, 81% use the internet.


http://www.pewinternet.org/chart/int...use-by-income/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Business
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top