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Old 08-14-2018, 07:32 PM
 
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There seems to be some businesses which are considerably easy to market than others.

1) Housing providers in crowded cities.
2) Anything healthcare-related as a provider (doctor, etc).

What are some other ideas?
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Old 08-18-2018, 08:12 AM
 
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1) Mini Storage. We literally amass more stuff than we can use. My wife and I, no hoarders in any sense of the word, are about to downsize into a smaller house. Yet our three kids are still in college or graduate school. So we'll rent a mini warehouse to hold furniture for their later use.



2) Rural Healthcare. It is shocking how many rural clinics and hospitals have shut down over the years, chiefly because care is getting concentrated in the cities.



3) Anything that saves time for working parents at a reasonable cost. If you work and have children, welcome to the treadmill. Between the job and homework and activities, you are running like a scalded dog from 6 am to bedtime.
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Old 08-18-2018, 08:21 AM
 
Location: D.C.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
1



3) Anything that saves time for working parents at a reasonable cost. If you work and have children, welcome to the treadmill. Between the job and homework and activities, you are running like a scalded dog from 6 am to bedtime.
Hence one of the often overlooked reasons why Amazon is eating up the retail sector! When I can order my kids back-to-school supplies at the stop light while on my way to work and they be there by the time I get home, worth itís weight in gold!
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Old 08-18-2018, 10:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NC211 View Post
Hence one of the often overlooked reasons why Amazon is eating up the retail sector! When I can order my kids back-to-school supplies at the stop light while on my way to work and they be there by the time I get home, worth it’s weight in gold!

We've reached a point where time is more precious than money. Fortunately Amazon saves both.



Christmas shopping used to be endless slogs through mall parking lots and crowded stores. Now, for the most part, it's sitting down at the computer a time or two and making selections. Voila. Everything shows up two days later.



If Amazon added a gift-wrapping service, they'd even grab more biz.
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Old 08-19-2018, 07:57 AM
 
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I think there is a big difference between a need that is in high demand, as you say easy to market and being a provider in the field and being able to be found by customers, which is much harder to market when it’s almost a commodity and you have to find a way to stand out.
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Old 08-19-2018, 08:22 AM
 
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My brother had a side hustle once of those stand-alone candy dispensers that you see in front of stores and the whatnot, the kind where you stick in a dime and get a handful of nuts. He did it awhile and actually made decent money doing it before getting tired of constantly filling machines and rolling dimes.



In truth, it would be the perfect side hustle for a college kid.
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Old 08-19-2018, 01:15 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
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Easiest to market? Home delivery of marijuana in a state where it is legal to use marijuana, preferably in a college town.

I'd combine it with a pizza delivery business. With an ap to order.
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Old 08-25-2018, 08:06 AM
 
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Certainly not my business. Although it has gotten easier, it’s still nearly impossible in the sense that 10 years later not a single marketing tactic has produced a positive ROI besides just my sales lady sending some emails, getting some referrals, and online free search.

In 2008, companies asked us, “Why do we need video? We already have a Website with photos.”

By 2013, companies knew they needed video finally, so that made it easier, and started asking, “Why your company?”

Even still corporate video is like a commodity to most companies. They don’t choose nearly as much on quality as on pure cost. It’s why it’s honestly not a very good business because your name and expertise just aren’t worth what you wish they were, which is the case in commercial film production and feature / TV production.
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Old 08-27-2018, 01:50 AM
 
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Maybe trying to sell online for the services which we provide through online might fetch more market and business
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Old 08-27-2018, 05:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by JonathanLB View Post
Certainly not my business. Although it has gotten easier, itís still nearly impossible in the sense that 10 years later not a single marketing tactic has produced a positive ROI besides just my sales lady sending some emails, getting some referrals, and online free search.

In 2008, companies asked us, ďWhy do we need video? We already have a Website with photos.Ē

By 2013, companies knew they needed video finally, so that made it easier, and started asking, ďWhy your company?Ē

Even still corporate video is like a commodity to most companies. They donít choose nearly as much on quality as on pure cost. Itís why itís honestly not a very good business because your name and expertise just arenít worth what you wish they were, which is the case in commercial film production and feature / TV production.
Thanks for the reply.

I have a friend who's a film freelancer. He's always hustling up some gig, and spending money any extra cash on rapidly depreciating film gear. He's doing what he loves, but definitely not getting ahead. And he's been at it a while as well. I told him he needs to do something like done videos of real estate at $500 a pop, but these creative types never want to do anything that's repeatable.

Creative video / film is quite unstable. Even if you're at the top of the industry in feature films, it's still super unstable and erratic of an industry.
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