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Old 03-07-2011, 09:00 AM
 
7,150 posts, read 8,772,061 times
Reputation: 3806

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apropos ... take away the benefits!

Crisis in Dairyland - For Richer and Poorer - Teachers and Wall Street - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart - 03/03/11 - Video Clip | Comedy Central

 
Old 03-07-2011, 09:52 AM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 7,630,911 times
Reputation: 2622
Quote:
You have no idea what my political leanings are, so I'd suggest you stop guessing before you embarrass yourself.
Apple trees grow apples, peach tree grow peaches, your remarks are standard Mark IV Rightwingie remarks. Your confusing parties with ideology is standard Mark IV rightwingie. Now, tis true I don't "know" your ideology, but I generally find apples on apple trees, not peach trees.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,781 posts, read 23,755,254 times
Reputation: 6174
This is going way off topic and also becoming too personal.

The issue is public employee cost and benefits. The original clip discusses the "need" for public employees to accept some type of reduction in benefits, because states cannot continue to afford the cost. It actually is a pretty interesting topic for anyone who really wishes to discuss it, there are legitimate multiple points of view here, and a couple of examples would be:

- private employees no longer have the benefits provided 30 or 40 years ago, so why should public employees

- public employees have had these benefits all along in trade for lower pay rates, and the issue wouldn't exist today if bankers and hedge fund managers didn't tank the economy


As an aside to this topic, the Little Hoover Commission recommended a modification in pension benefits, and it seems to be a reasonable compromise to me:

http://www.lhc.ca.gov/studies/204/Ex...Summary204.pdf
 
Old 03-07-2011, 12:58 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 7,630,911 times
Reputation: 2622
As a retired public employee, with 30 years in as a wildland firefighter, I sure wish I had all those great benefits we are accused of having. My wife, with 23 years teaching in agrees.
Our pensions are not enough to live on, we have no health benefits, there may be some other benefits out there, we don't get those either.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 17,408,991 times
Reputation: 4314
Quote:
Originally Posted by .highnlite View Post
As a retired public employee, with 30 years in as a wildland firefighter, I sure wish I had all those great benefits we are accused of having. My wife, with 23 years teaching in agrees.
Our pensions are not enough to live on, we have no health benefits, there may be some other benefits out there, we don't get those either.
Retired teachers get health benefits until they are 65 at which point they can get medicare. Retired firefighters typically get health benefits for life.

California teachers and firefighters get great benefits, my retired relatives all get more in retirement that they did most of their careers.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 01:34 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,374,464 times
Reputation: 29064
Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
Retired teachers get health benefits until they are 65 at which point they can get medicare. Retired firefighters typically get health benefits for life.
Myths and misinformation!

Teachers' benefits vary from school district to school district and many do not pay into Social Security, therefore they are not eligible for Medicare at age 65 nor any financial benefits at any age. This has changed somewhat in recent years but was a huge issue in CA not all that many years ago due to retired teachers being medically indigent and without resources for a decent quality of life in retirement.

Many game warden, park ranger, fire suppression positions, etc. at all levels of government are considered seasonal. Therefore, they may or may not come with pensions and other benefits are rare.

Ready!....3.....2....1....can you feel the conflate and hear the arguments?

Last edited by Curmudgeon; 03-07-2011 at 01:53 PM..
 
Old 03-07-2011, 01:40 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,422 posts, read 22,270,715 times
Reputation: 8613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Myths and misinformation!

Teachers' benefits vary from school district to school district and many do not pay into Social Security, therefore they are not eligible for Medicare at age 65 nor any financial benefits at any age. This has changed somewhat in recent years but was a huge issue in CA not all that many years ago due to retired teachers being medically indigent and without resources for a decent quality of life in retirement.

Many game warden, park ranger, fire suppression positions, etc. at all level;s of government are considered seasonal. Therefore, they may or may not come with pensions and other benefits are rare.

Ready!....3.....2....1....can you feel the conflate and hear the arguments?
Not sure what they can argue over. Anyone who knows teachers knows they don't retire comfortably. I heard the average lifespan for a teacher after retirement is like 5 years.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 01:58 PM
 
7,150 posts, read 8,772,061 times
Reputation: 3806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Myths and misinformation!

Teachers' benefits vary from school district to school district and many do not pay into Social Security, therefore they are not eligible for Medicare at age 65 nor any financial benefits at any age. This has changed somewhat in recent years but was a huge issue in CA not all that many years ago due to retired teachers being medically indigent and without resources for a decent quality of life in retirement.

Many game warden, park ranger, fire suppression positions, etc. at all level;s of government are considered seasonal. Therefore, they may or may not come with pensions and other benefits are rare.

Ready!....3.....2....1....can you feel the conflate and hear the arguments?
Master-Debater has been sighted, sir ... Conflatable-deflator armed and ready ... Wikipedia-alert status: DEFCON-1 ...
 
Old 03-07-2011, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 17,408,991 times
Reputation: 4314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Teachers' benefits vary from school district to school district and many do not pay into Social Security, therefore they are not eligible for Medicare at age 65 nor any financial benefits at any age.
And you accuse me of misinformation? You're not even getting the basic facts right. Social security and medicare are two different programs and are taxed separately. While teachers don't pay into social security, they do pay into medicare. Teachers are eligible for medicare at 65.

California's public work force receives rich benefits, the only people that seem to deny this are ahem....current and retired California public workers.

Paying these inflated benefits is going to cripple the state, there is no way around it. Young public workers are going to see pay cuts and benefit cuts, taxes are going to be shifted from important infrastructure projects, higher-education, etc to pay benefits. The sooner the youth wakes up to this reality the better, time to get the most destructive generation out of office.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 17,408,991 times
Reputation: 4314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Not sure what they can argue over. Anyone who knows teachers knows they don't retire comfortably. I heard the average lifespan for a teacher after retirement is like 5 years.
Yes you "heard". Why would the average life span of teachers be less than the general population? Teaching is not physically demanding...
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