U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-22-2011, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
71,700 posts, read 83,272,206 times
Reputation: 41535

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Setsuko View Post
Are people in Philadelphia who say "Philly" illiterate?
Philly has been used for generations, Cali isn't used except by those who think it sound cool. Well it doesn't and no, not all your people use it.

Nita
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-22-2011, 01:19 PM
 
Location: State of Jefferson coast
965 posts, read 2,613,401 times
Reputation: 1294
Quote:
Originally Posted by BVitamin View Post
Your former statement doesn't really agree with your latter statement. So it's not okay to shorten New York to York but it's okay to shorten El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de Los Angeles? By the way, that isn't the official name for the city of Los Angeles (it was only prior to the establishment of the U.S.), although Santiago de Cali is the official name.
You're conflating two entirely difference forms of abbreviation here. One is a reduced everday version of a formal form that ends up having fewer words than the formal version but is still expressed in whole words. If someone's name is listed on a birth certificate as Manuel José Laurencio García de Hernández, and he uses Manuel García as his everday name, he's not really "shortening" his name, he's just using the everday version of it. The other is apopocation: dropping the final syllables from a word so that the resulting utterance is a word fragment...in this case a fragment that happens to have the same spelling and pronunciation as a whole word signifying another place altogether.

Incidentally, "California" is not a Spanish word. "Nevada" and "Florida" are state names that are Spanish, but not "California." "California" has no meaning in Spanish. Anyone who speaks Spanish knows this. No one knows exactly where the name "California" came from. Here are a few theories from Wikipedia:

It is suggested that the word California may signify that it is a place that is "hot as an oven", because in Catalan "cal" means hot and "forn" means oven. (From the latin roots calida > hot, fornax > oven).[6] Or from Portuguese: "cal" means Calcium oxide (quicklime) and "forno" means, again, oven. It may signify quicklime oven. Another suggested source is kali forno, an indigenous phrase meaning "high mountains".[7]

Quote:
Originally Posted by BVitamin View Post
You also stated that shortening the name of New York to York is along the same lines as shortening California to Cali; so it's okay to shorten Spanish names, is what I'm feeling you're going to argue.
Not at all. The problem with shortening "New York" to simply "York" is that upon hearing the name "York" any educated person will immediately think of the famous historic walled city of York in England. Shortening "California" to "Cali" has the same problem: that utterance evokes a different place than that which the speaker meant to reference (except among the poorly educated, I suppose). It's a bit like the problem of using the form "Dan" as a nickname for "Daniela": that's somebody else's nickname.

Last edited by Brenda-by-the-sea; 03-22-2011 at 01:50 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-22-2011, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Here&There
2,209 posts, read 3,607,845 times
Reputation: 2423
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brenda-by-the-sea View Post
...
I don't know what to tell you, you purposely omit parts of my post and you omit parts of what you had posted ... to fit whatever it is you're wanting to make a point of.

Yes, the OP upon looking at this site's forums which has the U.S. states listed and s/he clicked on the "California" forum taking him/her to a list of sub-forums of major metros of California and decided to start a thread with a slang "Cali"; within his/her post s/he even refers to a certain area of California, San Louis Obispo -- but let's not take a guess as to what exactly s/he's referring to when s/he types "Cali", let's remain completely ignorant of the context and focus solely on our pet peeves (which is all it boils down to); obviously s/he is speaking of Colombia, right? You're the geography expert here, educated even (as self-proclaimed), is there an Orange County or even a San Luis Obispo in Colombia? Does Colombia even have counties?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-22-2011, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Aliso Viejo, Orange County, CA
4,941 posts, read 6,330,073 times
Reputation: 4064
OP, at this point are you sorry that you even asked?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-22-2011, 03:37 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
4,883 posts, read 7,303,848 times
Reputation: 1903
I lived on the central coast back in college (in Santa Barbara) and we would often go up to SLO to visit friends so, in response to the OP's question, SLO is fun for a short while but it is a very small town so unless you are looking for small town charms I would visit SLO but not move to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-22-2011, 05:09 PM
 
Location: State of Jefferson coast
965 posts, read 2,613,401 times
Reputation: 1294
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacific2 View Post
OP, at this point are you sorry that you even asked?
Actually, knowing the acceptable name, spelling and pronunciation of the place you're moving to is an important first step for dimming your I'm-not-from-here Dork Beacon.


If you want to move to San Francisco, learn that it's not called "Frisco."
If you want to move to Connecticut, learn that it's spelled with 2 "n's," 2"t's" and 3 "c's."
If you want to move to Oregon, learn that it's not pronounced AW-ruh-gawn.
If you want to move to New Orleans, learn that it's not pronounced "New or-LEENS."
If you want to move to Worcester, don't pronounce it "WAR-cess-ter"
If you want to move to Arkansas, don't call it "Our Kansas."
If you want to move to California, don't call it "Cali."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-22-2011, 07:09 PM
 
Location: US
17,879 posts, read 17,726,024 times
Reputation: 13869
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brenda-by-the-sea View Post
Actually, knowing the acceptable name, spelling and pronunciation of the place you're moving to is an important first step for dimming your I'm-not-from-here Dork Beacon.


If you want to move to San Francisco, learn that it's not called "Frisco."
If you want to move to Connecticut, learn that it's spelled with 2 "n's," 2"t's" and 3 "c's."
If you want to move to Oregon, learn that it's not pronounced AW-ruh-gawn.
If you want to move to New Orleans, learn that it's not pronounced "New or-LEENS."
If you want to move to Worcester, don't pronounce it "WAR-cess-ter"
If you want to move to Arkansas, don't call it "Our Kansas."
If you want to move to California, don't call it "Cali."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brenda-by-the-sea View Post
You're conflating two entirely difference forms of abbreviation here. One is a reduced everday version of a formal form that ends up having fewer words than the formal version but is still expressed in whole words. If someone's name is listed on a birth certificate as Manuel José Laurencio García de Hernández, and he uses Manuel García as his everday name, he's not really "shortening" his name, he's just using the everday version of it. The other is apopocation: dropping the final syllables from a word so that the resulting utterance is a word fragment...in this case a fragment that happens to have the same spelling and pronunciation as a whole word signifying another place altogether.

Incidentally, "California" is not a Spanish word. "Nevada" and "Florida" are state names that are Spanish, but not "California." "California" has no meaning in Spanish. Anyone who speaks Spanish knows this. No one knows exactly where the name "California" came from. Here are a few theories from Wikipedia:

It is suggested that the word California may signify that it is a place that is "hot as an oven", because in Catalan "cal" means hot and "forn" means oven. (From the latin roots calida > hot, fornax > oven).[6] Or from Portuguese: "cal" means Calcium oxide (quicklime) and "forno" means, again, oven. It may signify quicklime oven. Another suggested source is kali forno, an indigenous phrase meaning "high mountains".[7]



Not at all. The problem with shortening "New York" to simply "York" is that upon hearing the name "York" any educated person will immediately think of the famous historic walled city of York in England. Shortening "California" to "Cali" has the same problem: that utterance evokes a different place than that which the speaker meant to reference (except among the poorly educated, I suppose). It's a bit like the problem of using the form "Dan" as a nickname for "Daniela": that's somebody else's nickname.

You must be a really sad person! Read your posts, you are so dense you can't get off your throne. WHAT DOES THIS HAVE TO DO WITH THE OP'S QUESTION! Sorry, but I rarely am rude on City-Data, but you are just such a %^%&^^! I will from now on for the rest of my life refer California as CALI because of you. I used to hate the name Cali, but I don't want to be anything like you, so I will start with calling California, Cali....you can thank yourself . Good grief! Please go to the idiot forum if you want to continue this debate with someone who cares.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-22-2011, 07:27 PM
 
Location: State of Jefferson coast
965 posts, read 2,613,401 times
Reputation: 1294
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmw335xi View Post
Please go to the idiot forum if you want to continue this debate with someone who cares.
That's the forum where everyone posts in blue-colored font, I take it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2011, 01:04 AM
 
Location: Northern Cal
7 posts, read 6,072 times
Reputation: 14
@Oerdin, I was raised in the east (SF) bay and Marin Co. I always refer to California as Cali, when speaking to people from out of state. Something similar (to your suggestion) is true of SF, however. No one from "The City" (which is what we call SF) refers to it as "Frisco".

@upstatenykid- As I read your post, it SCREAMED San Luis (commonly referred to as San Lou-ee or SLO) to me. It's a great place to live. You might like Santa Barbara (commonly referred to as SB), too. My daughter did her lower division at Santa Barbara City College, which has a beautiful campus, right up the street from the beach. I also recommend taking a look at Cabrillo JC in Santa Cruz and Skyline JC in San Bruno. Keep your GPA up at any of the JCs, and you can get a TAg (transfer agreement), in the event that you decide you would like to transfer to obtain your bachelors.

Good luck, kid. Tip- It is very difficult to complete homework at the beach
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2011, 01:09 AM
 
Location: Northern Cal
7 posts, read 6,072 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by BVitamin View Post
I don't know what to tell you, you purposely omit parts of my post and you omit parts of what you had posted ... to fit whatever it is you're wanting to make a point of.

Yes, the OP upon looking at this site's forums which has the U.S. states listed and s/he clicked on the "California" forum taking him/her to a list of sub-forums of major metros of California and decided to start a thread with a slang "Cali"; within his/her post s/he even refers to a certain area of California, San Louis Obispo -- but let's not take a guess as to what exactly s/he's referring to when s/he types "Cali", let's remain completely ignorant of the context and focus solely on our pet peeves (which is all it boils down to); obviously s/he is speaking of Colombia, right? You're the geography expert here, educated even (as self-proclaimed), is there an Orange County or even a San Luis Obispo in Colombia? Does Colombia even have counties?
Since you're busy fighting over pronunciations and quotations, I'll bother to point out- it's San Luis Obisbo. Not San Louis.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:29 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top