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Old 04-08-2011, 05:19 PM
 
28 posts, read 33,416 times
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we speak proper english in California
then when you get to Hawaii it gets messed up again.

j/k
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Old 04-08-2011, 08:49 PM
 
4 posts, read 5,238 times
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of course we have accents
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Old 04-08-2011, 08:57 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
4,884 posts, read 4,511,355 times
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I think California benefited from having Hollywood here and much of the media here. People in the US have been hearing Californians speak (in the movies or on TV) for so long that if there was a wider California accent it has become the default American standard English accent. I guess that isn't surprising given how people love to imitate the rich and famous especially if they think he's cool or she's a sex-bomb.

There are still subculture accents/dialects but they're defined by what people do rather then where they live. Examples: Surfers saying things like "radical, dude" (late 80's to early 90's example so some what dated but you get the point) or hippy mannerism or even suburban valley girls "Like, oh, my god!".
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Old 04-08-2011, 09:11 PM
 
13,340 posts, read 10,601,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dodgerguy View Post
If you hear someone speak do you think, "they have to be from CA" or something along those lines? THanks just curious
There's a very good wikipedia article on California English here:

California English - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 04-08-2011, 09:14 PM
 
13,340 posts, read 10,601,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
I'm told that we have an accent. Almost Canadian sounding to some as we clip our vowels more than most other Americans I guess. Never got the Irish thing though. Some people can sometimes tell I'm from Northern Ca. My girlfriend talks about my speech all the time like how my short I's and E's sound the same and how I stress the 1st syllable in words like San Diego and San Francisco. I think she's crazy but oh well lol
When the short "i" and short "e" sounds are pronounced the same, it's known as the pin/pen merger. The pin/pen merger is a feature of English in many parts of CA, although it exists in other states as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pin-pen...Pin-pen_merger
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Old 04-08-2011, 09:18 PM
 
Location: West Coast Wanderer
11,837 posts, read 9,422,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
When the short "i" and short "e" sounds are pronounced the same, it's known as the pin/pen merger. The pin/pen merger is a feature of English in many parts of CA, although it exists in other states as well.

Phonological history of English high front vowels - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Oh I'm quite familiar with it. For whatever reason though, it seems people in San Diego notice it more. They also notice some other words I apparently say differently.
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Old 04-08-2011, 09:19 PM
 
13,340 posts, read 10,601,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ferretkona View Post
I would think they spoke spanish in Cali, Columbia.

Yes, as far as I know they do speak Spanish in Cali, Columbia
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Old 04-08-2011, 09:20 PM
 
13,340 posts, read 10,601,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Oh I'm quite familiar with it. For whatever reason though, it seems people in San Diego notice it more. They also notice some other words I apparently say differently.

Hmmm. I do think there are some differences between different parts of CA.
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Old 04-08-2011, 09:23 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
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people on the west coast talk very fast usually. I was told this when I moved to Texas. After listening to my friends and familly back home I've found this to be true.
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Old 04-08-2011, 09:33 PM
 
Location: West Coast Wanderer
11,837 posts, read 9,422,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KC6ZLV View Post
Every region has their own dialect.

I think there are about three or four general California dialects that have a noticeable difference in pronunciation. Northern California, Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley. The differences are subtle in most cases, to very obvious in some parts of the San Joaquin Valley. There are several others where the main difference is in the use of vocabulary or slang. They usually appear to belong to metro areas specifically. One of the classic ones is how highways are addressed. Here in Sacramento it is usually, "I-5, US-50, Hwy-99." People from Los Angeles invariably say, "the-5, the-50, the-99." I hear freeways in the Bay Area often addressed with just the number. "one-oh-one, six-eighty," and so on. In Fresno they quite often add the preposition "on" in front of the number. "On 41, on 168, on, niney-nine ." A lot of people in Fresno drop the pronunciation of t. I should also note, that dialect in the San Joaquin Valley is the result of the Okies who came during the depression. The degree of the dialect ranges from imperceptible in the cities to very noticeable in some rural towns.

There are quite a few maps of American dialects.

American English Dialects

This one shows the San Joaquin Valley as having a dialect. It also shows the Bay Area as having a dialect similar to the "Midland America" dialect. I've seen other maps which show the same dialect extending through the Sacramento Valley to Portland. I've also seen maps showing this dialect followed the railroads to the West. The same article mentioned Sacramento and Portland sharing some of the characteristics found in Philadelphia.

FAST-US-1 Intro to American English Reference File

The second map shows a difference between Northern and Southern California, but a difference between Northern California and Oregon. I think the people in the Sacramento Valley up through the Portland Metro area speak the same.
Very very good post. I saw some trends that I have that I never noticed in myself before. Explaines better why people in SD sometimes say that I "talk weird" LOL
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