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Old 04-17-2011, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Business ethics is an oxymoron.
875 posts, read 763,304 times
Reputation: 1599
The Salton is indeed a wierd, sublime, and sometimes even creepy area. I dunno. Maybe instead of entertaining all these fantasies about "saving" it, maybe we should just let the Gulf reclaim it. It should be a pretty straightforward task to remove the "dam" that prevents the ocean from gravity dropping in. "Beachfront" property in Indio and an hour from Blythe or Yuma would suddenly be a reality. Not river or lake front, but actual ocean. The thought of that arid region being intersected by the ocean seems something straight out of the SciFi channel, but a couple of bulldozers and a few sticks of dynamite can really make it happen.

The area has been submerged before. Hell you don't need Wikipedia or a Geologist to prove that if you know what you are looking for. Anyone who's driven north on Hwy 86 towards Indio away from Imperial can very clearly see the waterlines on the side of the hills as you approach Mecca. Even to the untrained eye it's obvious that the area was indeed once under water. Since water seeks its own level, it isn't at all difficult to look away from the hillsides across the open valley and envision the amount and depth of water that once stood there. As was mentioned, The Gulf (or Sea of Cortez if you prefer) really did once extend as far north as where Indio is now.
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Old 04-17-2011, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Southern California
12,243 posts, read 8,873,237 times
Reputation: 7939
I say do nothing.
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Old 04-17-2011, 09:00 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 3,155,064 times
Reputation: 2622
The idea of opening it to the Sea of Cortez is interesting, the level of the lake would rise over 200 feet. Done right, it could possible save the Vaquitas.
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Old 04-17-2011, 10:26 PM
 
2,739 posts, read 5,534,520 times
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The whole area from the US-Mexican border south to the coast of the Sea of Cortez is above sea level...so that would be a herculean task to level all of that land to at least sea level just to let the area north of the border turn to an extension of the Gulf of California. Remember that the Colorado River was responsible for creating a massive inland sea (Lake Cahuila) which was a much larger and earlier version of the Salton Sea. But over time the river changed course and it's sediments increased the elevation south of the border...and now that the Colorado is damed up, there is minimal discharge into the Gulf...so there is a hige swath of land that is above sea level south of the border and that prevents the ocean from moving north.
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Old 04-17-2011, 10:43 PM
 
253 posts, read 155,706 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelito23 View Post
No one here has brought up faith or blame or politics or supposition. We are just addressing an issue using common sense and you are questioning it. Everything can be second and third guessed. Prove to me the sun will come up tomorrow morning. But I want proof and I want it before it happens.

See how unreasonable that sounds?

I don't get what you are trying to argue or have proven or what you perceive to be controversial...but you do have all the tools at your fingertips to find the information you are requesting. Wikipedia is a portal to other sites and has an extensive bibliography on it's Salton Sea page. Now it's on YOU to prove that it WOULDN'T happen. I just flipped the script on you lol! J/J don't prove anything. We are just sharing out concerns. If you have a different opinion just make it clear so we can debate it. Thanks.



I am asking whether it is a "problem", because I can not find data that it is, or will, or can be...

From your cited web page:

"As a result, the Salton Sink or Salton Basin has long been alternately a fresh water lake and a dry desert basin, depending on random river flows and the balance between inflow and evaporative loss. A lake would exist only when it was replenished by the river and rainfall, a cycle that repeated itself countless times over hundreds of thousands of years - most recently when the lake was recreated in 1905."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salton_...EugeneSinger-2
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Old 04-18-2011, 01:50 AM
 
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When those cycles were repeated, the lake wasn't a toxic mess of chemicals and sewage waste like it is now.
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Old 04-18-2011, 07:59 AM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 3,155,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelito23 View Post
The whole area from the US-Mexican border south to the coast of the Sea of Cortez is above sea level...so that would be a herculean task to level all of that land to at least sea level just to let the area north of the border turn to an extension of the Gulf of California. .
Nah, A canal would be easily done, far easier than creating the Panama Canal.

Or, a siphon. Lay a large pipe from the Sea of Cortez to the Salton Sea and siphon action would bring the water level up 200 feet to sea level, although that would not do much for the Vaquitas

Reason42 is quarreling for the sake of quarreling. I am sure he understands the deposition of pollutants over the past 100 years is far different than what ever occurred prior to the modern creation of the Salton Sea.
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Old 04-18-2011, 10:30 AM
 
2,739 posts, read 5,534,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by .highnlite View Post
Nah, A canal would be easily done, far easier than creating the Panama Canal.

Or, a siphon. Lay a large pipe from the Sea of Cortez to the Salton Sea and siphon action would bring the water level up 200 feet to sea level, although that would not do much for the Vaquitas

Reason42 is quarreling for the sake of quarreling. I am sure he understands the deposition of pollutants over the past 100 years is far different than what ever occurred prior to the modern creation of the Salton Sea.
But here is the thing. You could have a canal to get sea water (with lower salinity) in and make a huge theoretical lake. But the effect would be the same as it is now. It would just be a larger contaminated inland salty lake downt the road, because it would stil be cut off from the Gulf of California by 100 miles of land....it would onlyhave the canal depositing water to a certain level. The water would still be stagnant and nasty though because the conditions that ruined the Sea originally would still be present. There would have to be some kind of system where water was pumped in and out, which has been proposed and isn't really feasible considering costs and the two countries involved and MAINLY the fact that Mexico doesn't want the nasty Salton Sea water to be recycled back into their Sea of Cortez where they have shrimp farms and local fishing industries and tourism.

There really doesn't seem to be any ideal situation for the sea. Just letting it dry up partially and have it self-reduce into two smaller lakes, the semi freshwater north lake and the highly salty and dirty south lake to control contaminants. That is also the most effective solution as well.
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Old 04-18-2011, 02:38 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 3,155,064 times
Reputation: 2622
The Salton Sea is likely to be part of the Sea of Cortez one day, since Saint Andreas rules that part of the country. I think helping it along would be a good thing.

Shrimp farms in the Sea of Cortez? Donde? Actually the Mexicans are destroying the Sea of Cortez fisheries as fast as they can.
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Old 04-18-2011, 09:54 PM
 
253 posts, read 155,706 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelito23 View Post
When those cycles were repeated, the lake wasn't a toxic mess of chemicals and sewage waste like it is now.


Please prove to me that it is a problem, because if it is some lawyering is gonna make some people rich....


OEHHA Fish: Salton Sea (Imperial and Riverside Counties)
file:///C:/Users/ANONYM%7E1/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot.png (broken link)
CA.GOV | Safe Eating Guidelines for Fish from Salton Sea (Imperial and Riverside Counties)
[09/17/04, updated 03/18/09]


OEHHA updated the advisory for fish from the Salton Sea.
[CENTER]Safe Eating Guidelines for
Fish from the Salton Sea
[/CENTER]

All Consumers
2 servings per week









DATA, not ignorant faith...
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