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Old 06-30-2011, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 17,449,227 times
Reputation: 4321

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TVC15 View Post
Home prices are astronomically higher in all of California for what you pay for compared to what you can buy in Texas for the same price...that is all over California not just the Bay Area.

And naturally this is wildly inaccurate, its obvious that you don't have much experience with the state. There are numerous areas in California that have housing costs that are comparable to Texas, just look in the Inland Empire, the Central Valley, and Northern California. Outside of a few exclusive communities, homes on the central coast are fairly comparable as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TVC15 View Post
Actually it really is not...it is not humid all over Texas and it is not flat all over Texas and the cities are completely different from each other just like here in California.
The vast majority of Texas residents live in hot humid flat areas of the state.
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Old 06-30-2011, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 17,449,227 times
Reputation: 4321
Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Almost all of CA's high income jobs and most valuable cos. are created around PaloAlto area....not in SJ; almost zero innovation in commie SF ex dubious CRM, Zynga, Twit (which are dwarfs vs the BigTech ard PaloAlto); and near-zero of an economy in the low-IQ, poor EastBay (despite Berkeley's famed CS/EE depts which smart kids flee every yr for jobs in PaloAlto area)....and LA is a joke of an economy in creating valuable new cos. or jobs...whether in finance or tech....Occidental Petroleum is LA's most valuable co; tiny Broadcom is Irvine's most valuable co......and Qualcomm is SD's most valuable co. and easily most valuable tech co. in LA/SD corridor: another corridor which has created near-zero new, valuable tech cos. in decades...
Talk about tunnel vision.....
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Old 06-30-2011, 09:46 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 35,966,236 times
Reputation: 7512
Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
The vast majority of Texas residents live in hot humid flat areas of the state.
With the exception of the Hill Country, Texas is either flat, hot and humid or flat, hot, and dry. To paraphrase the man with the guitar and the statue in Austin, I can't stand the weather.
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Old 06-30-2011, 10:01 PM
 
26 posts, read 31,221 times
Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
Californians don't want to be Texans, why is this so difficult to understand?

California is not doing poorly right now because it doesn't have Texas like policies, its doing poorly because it was ground zero for the housing bubble. On the other hand Texas was only mildly effected by the housing bubble and has benefited from the increase in energy costs, not to mention the pick up in manufacturing.

Long-term I'd bet on California, not Texas.
So what exactly does the housing bubble have to do with underfunded pensions and bloated government?

BTW.. We pretty much lost our manufacturing. My money is on Texas. Man cannot like on McService jobs alone. You have to produce something and we don't.
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Old 06-30-2011, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 17,449,227 times
Reputation: 4321
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDNative70 View Post
So what exactly does the housing bubble have to do with underfunded pensions and bloated government?
Underfunded pensions actually has a lot to do with the housing bubble, the pensions funds lost a lot on the A-rated toxic crap created by the financial industry.

Bloated government is a matter of perspective...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SDNative70 View Post
BTW.. We pretty much lost our manufacturing. My money is on Texas. Man cannot like on McService jobs alone. You have to produce something and we don't.
Huh? Los Angeles is the largest manufacturing center in the united states. But that isn't all, California produces tons of cultural (movies, music, etc), software and other IP related goods as well.
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Old 06-30-2011, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Central Bay Area, CA as of Jan 2010...but still a proud Texan from Houston!
7,484 posts, read 8,703,455 times
Reputation: 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
And naturally this is wildly inaccurate, its obvious that you don't have much experience with the state. There are numerous areas in California that have housing costs that are comparable to Texas, just look in the Inland Empire, the Central Valley, and Northern California. Outside of a few exclusive communities, homes on the central coast are fairly comparable as well.
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The vast majority of Texas residents live in hot humid flat areas of the state.
Obviously you don't have much experience with the state of Texas.

Find me a nice home in the areas that you describe that are comparable with housing costs in Texas...that are newly built and not out in the boonies. I personally would not want to live in the Central Valley or the Inland Empire. In Texas you don't have to live in an undesirable location to be able to afford a house.

You can live in the most prime areas of Houston, Dallas and Austin for a hell of a lot less then what you will pay to live in the prime areas of California.
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Old 07-01-2011, 05:01 AM
 
3,219 posts, read 8,006,351 times
Reputation: 1411
San Antonio is really a nice place to live in Texas
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Old 07-01-2011, 06:57 AM
 
15,734 posts, read 9,253,176 times
Reputation: 14217
Quote:
Originally Posted by SyraBrian View Post
Texas' relative low cost of living will make it a magnet for folks on SSI. The influx of SSI recipients will drain the tax base without supplying revenue growth.

Texas is doomed!
Because we all know that people on SSI don't eat, put gas in their cars, or spend any money.
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Old 07-01-2011, 07:02 AM
 
15,734 posts, read 9,253,176 times
Reputation: 14217
Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
And naturally this is wildly inaccurate, its obvious that you don't have much experience with the state. There are numerous areas in California that have housing costs that are comparable to Texas, just look in the Inland Empire, the Central Valley, and Northern California. Outside of a few exclusive communities, homes on the central coast are fairly comparable as well.
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The vast majority of Texas residents live in hot humid flat areas of the state.
I'd say you are being wildly inaccurate. I just moved from NorCal to Texas. Sold a house in CA and just bought one here in TX.

There are NO houses comparable in CA to Texas. We just looked at MANY houses in Texas, needing minimal work to make them nice, for around $60,000 to $80,000. Nice neighborhoods, close to a major city. I dare you to find anything remotely similar in CA. It just doesn't happen. I know that first hand.
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:28 AM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 7,661,371 times
Reputation: 2622
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringwise View Post
I'd say you are being wildly inaccurate. I just moved from NorCal to Texas. Sold a house in CA and just bought one here in TX.

There are NO houses comparable in CA to Texas. We just looked at MANY houses in Texas, needing minimal work to make them nice, for around $60,000 to $80,000. Nice neighborhoods, close to a major city. I dare you to find anything remotely similar in CA. It just doesn't happen. I know that first hand.
Where in "NorCal" Alturas? Weed? Weaverville? Susanville? Anderson? or are you confusing the Bay area with North California?

I find it odd that there are those who apparently missed Econ 101. Housing prices like most prices are subject to the same laws of supply and demand as most products.

High supply, low demand, low price
High demand, low supply, high price.

It is basic economics that if housing prices are low it is because either the supply is high, or....... few people find the area attractive.

It is basic economics that if housing prices are high it is because either the supply is low, or....... people find the area attractive.

There is no mystery.
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