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Old 01-18-2012, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Police State
1,472 posts, read 1,238,517 times
Reputation: 1225

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Well if Hollywood thinks that corporations should be empowered as the internet police and that free speech and due process should become null and void, well why not? If you're not pirating, you don't have anything to worry about.
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Old 01-18-2012, 11:32 PM
 
11,726 posts, read 24,816,091 times
Reputation: 7136
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZhugeLiang View Post
Well if Hollywood thinks that corporations should be empowered as the internet police and that free speech and due process should become null and void, well why not? If you're not pirating, you don't have anything to worry about.
If you're not doing anything illegal, then you won't object to random police searches of your home, right?
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:29 AM
 
Location: San Jose
68 posts, read 84,246 times
Reputation: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snort View Post
St. Thomas Aquinas on Tolerance

I can only answer that one with Thomistic thought on the subject.
As a relativist and a "social libertarian" I couldn't disagree more with that quote. "Virtue" is such a subjective concept that varies heavily from person to person.

To WHOSE virtues are we gradually going to be leading the men? Churchs'? Politicians'?

-- ilya
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:56 AM
 
Location: San Jose
68 posts, read 84,246 times
Reputation: 76
I personally think piracy is an inevitable consequence of modern "age of information" and no amount of regulations will stifle it. Most people forget that before the Internet, and its providers [ISPs], people had no problem sharing digital information with each other via other technologies; all they needed is a phone line. So until we have at least some form of telecommunications networks the information will be passed around. And you don't even need that: a while back I was reading and article about Cuba's form of P2P sharing, which they call "sneakerware" because it literally involves people passing around CDs and USB sticks to each other, with pirated material and what not. Similar thing was/is going on in the Eastern European country I was born in .

The main problem is that these entertainment media representatives are like dinosaurs trying to fight evolution. They still want the good times to roll where they made POS movie/music album/book/game and people still would go and pay for it just out of curiosity; because they didn't have any other options. The same thing was happening with Betamax and VHS tapes, because those were the first widely available technologies that allowed people to capture and potentially distribute content. We all know how that war ended - not much happened.

The entertainment industry needs to adapt and figure out how to profit off of Internet. They need to give people options [ie. Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, etc.] that will make piracy impractical, not fight something that's bigger and, frankly, more important than them.

-- ilya

Last edited by ilushka; 01-19-2012 at 11:10 AM..
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Old 01-19-2012, 11:13 AM
 
Location: West Coast Wanderer
12,952 posts, read 11,207,553 times
Reputation: 6242
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilushka View Post
I personally think piracy is an inevitable consequence of modern "age of information" and no amount of regulations will stifle it. Most people forget that before the Internet, and its providers [ISPs], people had no problem sharing digital information with each other via other technologies; all they needed is a phone line. So until we have at least some form of telecommunications networks the information will be passed around. And you don't even need that: a while back I was reading and article about Cuba's form of P2P sharing, which they call "sneakerware" because it literally involves people passing around CDs and USB sticks to each other, with pirated material and what not. Similar thing was/is going on the country I was born in country in Eastern Europe.

The main problem is that these entertainment media representatives are like dinosaurs trying to fight evolution. They still want the good times to roll where they made POS movie/music album/book/game and people still would go and pay for it just out of curiosity; because they didn't have any other options. The same thing was happening with Betamax and VHS tapes, because those were the first widely available technologies that allowed people to capture and potentially distribute content. We all know how that war ended - not much happened.

The entertainment industry needs to adapt and figure out how to profit off of Internet. They need to give people options [ie. Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, etc.] that will make piracy impractical, not fight something that's bigger and, frankly, more important than them.

-- ilya
+1

That's what this is really all about. The music and movie industry has lost it's control to the internet as people don't shop for these things like they once did. Netflix and Youtube are the choices. I'm an artist myself with my own music on the internet. I am able to share it how I like precisely because the internet is free and open. I cannot speak too much for the movie industry but the music industry hates this. Indie artist can completely bypass the old waiting to be discovered by and being forced into big label deals. With the internet one can start their own labels, copyright their own music and register it directly with a performing rights organization all of which I have done. If for example someone were to claim that one of the sites I use contains pirated material, my means of distribution would be gone.

The RIAA is a good example of this. When publishing music you obtain what are called ISRC codes. The RIAA supplied these for free up till 2009. You could get 100,000 of them. Then along came CD Baby which will supply them for free with the total CD digital distribution package which is less than 50 dollars. The RIAA now charges 75 dollars to get these codes. Other countries still largely offer them for free. It would benefit the RIAA a great deal if musicians were forced to go through them to obtain their ISRC's.

Naturally I am totally against SOPA and PIPA even as a struggling artist myself.
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Old 01-20-2012, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Police State
1,472 posts, read 1,238,517 times
Reputation: 1225
Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapeCalifornia View Post
If you're not doing anything illegal, then you won't object to random police searches of your home, right?
Incremental, my friend, incremental.
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Old 01-20-2012, 02:06 AM
 
Location: Police State
1,472 posts, read 1,238,517 times
Reputation: 1225
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilushka View Post
I personally think piracy is an inevitable consequence of modern "age of information" and no amount of regulations will stifle it. Most people forget that before the Internet, and its providers [ISPs], people had no problem sharing digital information with each other via other technologies; all they needed is a phone line. So until we have at least some form of telecommunications networks the information will be passed around. And you don't even need that: a while back I was reading and article about Cuba's form of P2P sharing, which they call "sneakerware" because it literally involves people passing around CDs and USB sticks to each other, with pirated material and what not. Similar thing was/is going on in the Eastern European country I was born in .

The main problem is that these entertainment media representatives are like dinosaurs trying to fight evolution. They still want the good times to roll where they made POS movie/music album/book/game and people still would go and pay for it just out of curiosity; because they didn't have any other options. The same thing was happening with Betamax and VHS tapes, because those were the first widely available technologies that allowed people to capture and potentially distribute content. We all know how that war ended - not much happened.

The entertainment industry needs to adapt and figure out how to profit off of Internet. They need to give people options [ie. Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, etc.] that will make piracy impractical, not fight something that's bigger and, frankly, more important than them.

-- ilya
+2

Things like Netflix, Zune, Hulu, Spotify, etc, came about largely due to piracy. You like unlimited movie streaming for $8 a month? Or unlimited streaming and downloading of music for $10 a month? This is what piracy did. It transformed the market forever. Big Content was forced to adapt quickly when it became clear that the consumer was no longer willing to pay what they were charging and had the tools to take what they wanted, freeware programs to circumvent copy protection, P2P, etc.

What we're seeing now however with SOPA and PIPA, is Big Content's last gasp for control to buy government enforcement of their antiquated business model. Even if they win, they still lose. You can't stop piracy, it's the neverending game of whack a' mole. Seizing digital locker sites like Megaupload will achieve nothing in the long run. That's one down, thousands to go.
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Old 01-20-2012, 08:17 PM
 
Location: West Coast Wanderer
12,952 posts, read 11,207,553 times
Reputation: 6242
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZhugeLiang View Post
+2

Things like Netflix, Zune, Hulu, Spotify, etc, came about largely due to piracy. You like unlimited movie streaming for $8 a month? Or unlimited streaming and downloading of music for $10 a month? This is what piracy did. It transformed the market forever. Big Content was forced to adapt quickly when it became clear that the consumer was no longer willing to pay what they were charging and had the tools to take what they wanted, freeware programs to circumvent copy protection, P2P, etc.

What we're seeing now however with SOPA and PIPA, is Big Content's last gasp for control to buy government enforcement of their antiquated business model. Even if they win, they still lose. You can't stop piracy, it's the neverending game of whack a' mole. Seizing digital locker sites like Megaupload will achieve nothing in the long run. That's one down, thousands to go.
+1 to you too
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