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Old 01-27-2012, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Fresno
104 posts, read 174,579 times
Reputation: 107

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibbiekat View Post
I wondered that too.



On the map it appears that Stockton-Modesto-Merced are one statistical area, but they are on the list separately. Am I not reading the map right?
Yes, you are reading the map incorrectly. The yellow borders between those areas define the CMSA boundaries. Look at the lines, not the colors.
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Old 01-28-2012, 01:00 AM
 
1,077 posts, read 1,437,453 times
Reputation: 877
It's hard to defend our region, but I think the list could have just said "central california" instead of piling on with splitting it up among a bunch of cities lol.
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Old 01-28-2012, 03:03 AM
 
2,090 posts, read 2,222,022 times
Reputation: 1068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson502 View Post
More or less confirming what we already know in the article. The central valley is the armpit of cali. Hell its even shaped/smells like one to.
And yet, the state's strong agricultural and oil economies are from the "armpit" of California.
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Old 01-28-2012, 06:46 AM
 
1,030 posts, read 1,597,354 times
Reputation: 760
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimC2462 View Post
And yet, the state's strong agricultural and oil economies are from the "armpit" of California.
Yes, there are a few wealthy land owners who certainly benefit from the production. Meanwhile, the workers are not paid a living wage and are laid off when the demand decreases.
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Old 01-28-2012, 10:24 AM
 
2,090 posts, read 2,222,022 times
Reputation: 1068
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadwarrior101 View Post
Yes, there are a few wealthy land owners who certainly benefit from the production.
The benefits of these production is not limited to the few. The wealthy may get enormous profit from these and I have no argument about that. The real issue I was pointing out that the entire state benefits from the production of the large resources found in central valley.

Quote:
Meanwhile, the workers are not paid a living wage and are laid off when the demand decreases.
True. But argument isn't exclusive to the central valley. Let's take Chevron/Texaco for example. Here in the central valley, they are sucking the oil wells dry and finding new ones to drill, while playing lower property taxes and paying their oil employees as little as possible. That's on top of the numerous tax deductions they take advantage of to improve their bottom line.

And Chevron/Texaco is headquartered in San Ramon, in the heart of east bay.
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