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Old 01-29-2012, 10:14 PM
 
Location: The Other California
4,258 posts, read 2,489,284 times
Reputation: 1478

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Although a lifelong Californian born to Californian parents, I was 22 years old before I realized that the city of Sacramento, where I then resided, was named for the Blessed Sacrament - the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ. More specifically, the city was named for the Sacramento River, which was named for the Blessed Sacrament by Spanish explorer Gabriel Moraga in 1808.

How many Californians realize that the city of Los Angeles was not named for angels, but for the Blessed Virgin Mary? "Nuestra Senora la Reina de los Angeles", Our Lady Queen of the Angels!

It isn't just that these names are in Spanish. I recall one visit to the city of my birth, Santa Barbara, in which I had a delightful conversation with a pretty lady of Mexican descent. She was a school administrator. In the course of our conversation I mentioned that I would be visiting a small monastery in the city where the relics of Saint Barbara, a third century martyr and the city's patroness, were kept for veneration. I told her that the relics of Saint Barbara could be found in four locations around the city. She gasped and placed her hand over her mouth, as if embarrassed, then said: "Oh my God! I'm Catholic, and I've lived here all my life, and I had no idea!!!"

Santa Cruz means "holy cross": there is no female "Saint Cruz". San Francisco, of course, is named for the radical Saint Francis of Assisi, an austere penitent who would be horrified at the wickedness that is too often linked to this once great Catholic city. San Juan Capistrano is named for the Franciscan warrior-monk whose fiery preaching converted thousands of sinners, and who is renowned for his valor in battle against the Mohammedans. California could use a saint like him today.

Even cities without the "San" and "Santa" designations are named for saints, like the city of Ventura, which is named for Saint Bonaventure, a great theologian and mystic.

Another commonly overlooked place name is "El Camino Real" - the "king's highway" or the "royal road" - which refers to the path to heaven trod by Christ the King and his disciples, as well as the trail connecting California's original 21 Franciscan missions under the Spanish crown.

What's the name of your city? What does it mean? Not all of us live in cities with such illustrious names. Presently, I live nearest to a city whose name was one of three drawn from a hat, the only thing being certain is that the name is an English surname.
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Old 01-29-2012, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
2,192 posts, read 3,351,151 times
Reputation: 1950
Well yeah.
The Spanish conquistadors = Catholic.
Mexicans were in California 2nd before stupid white man.
I love Spanish.
I love Mexico.
I love Christ.
Catholicism ... well not really but whatever.
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Old 01-29-2012, 11:58 PM
 
7,151 posts, read 4,462,719 times
Reputation: 3806
Quote:
Originally Posted by WesternPilgrim View Post
Although a lifelong Californian born to Californian parents, I was 22 years old before I realized that the city of Sacramento, where I then resided, was named for the Blessed Sacrament - the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ. More specifically, the city was named for the Sacramento River, which was named for the Blessed Sacrament by Spanish explorer Gabriel Moraga in 1808.

How many Californians realize that the city of Los Angeles was not named for angels, but for the Blessed Virgin Mary? "Nuestra Senora la Reina de los Angeles", Our Lady Queen of the Angels!

It isn't just that these names are in Spanish. I recall one visit to the city of my birth, Santa Barbara, in which I had a delightful conversation with a pretty lady of Mexican descent. She was a school administrator. In the course of our conversation I mentioned that I would be visiting a small monastery in the city where the relics of Saint Barbara, a third century martyr and the city's patroness, were kept for veneration. I told her that the relics of Saint Barbara could be found in four locations around the city. She gasped and placed her hand over her mouth, as if embarrassed, then said: "Oh my God! I'm Catholic, and I've lived here all my life, and I had no idea!!!"

Santa Cruz means "holy cross": there is no female "Saint Cruz". San Francisco, of course, is named for the radical Saint Francis of Assisi, an austere penitent who would be horrified at the wickedness that is too often linked to this once great Catholic city. San Juan Capistrano is named for the Franciscan warrior-monk whose fiery preaching converted thousands of sinners, and who is renowned for his valor in battle against the Mohammedans. California could use a saint like him today.

Even cities without the "San" and "Santa" designations are named for saints, like the city of Ventura, which is named for Saint Bonaventure, a great theologian and mystic.

Another commonly overlooked place name is "El Camino Real" - the "king's highway" or the "royal road" - which refers to the path to heaven trod by Christ the King and his disciples, as well as the trail connecting California's original 21 Franciscan missions under the Spanish crown.

What's the name of your city? What does it mean? Not all of us live in cities with such illustrious names. Presently, I live nearest to a city whose name was one of three drawn from a hat, the only thing being certain is that the name is an English surname.
Gee, isn't it swell we have another religious lesson in the sinfulness of others? To which I will offer my contribution to the list of really neat California place names:
Manlove, CA
Manlove is a populated place located in Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowedSacramento County at latitude 38.554 and longitude -121.372.

Last edited by Yac; 01-31-2012 at 07:04 AM..
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Old 01-30-2012, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Southern California
3,116 posts, read 4,104,555 times
Reputation: 3513
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaijai View Post
Spanish conquistadors = Catholic.
Yep!
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Old 01-30-2012, 02:47 AM
 
Location: The Other California
4,258 posts, read 2,489,284 times
Reputation: 1478
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaijai View Post
Well yeah.
The Spanish conquistadors = Catholic.
Mexicans were in California 2nd before stupid white man.
I love Spanish.
I love Mexico.
I love Christ.
Catholicism ... well not really but whatever.
"Stupid white man?" Me? What makes you think I'm white?

You love Mexico and Christ but shrug at Catholicism? Sorry, that doesn't compute!
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Old 01-30-2012, 03:06 AM
 
Location: The Other California
4,258 posts, read 2,489,284 times
Reputation: 1478
Quote:
Originally Posted by nullgeo View Post
To which I will offer my contribution to the list of really neat California place names: Manlove, CA
A fine Christian name, Manlove. Dates back to the baptismal names in 7th century England: "mann leof", translated "dear friend".
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Old 01-30-2012, 03:26 AM
Status: "Playing World of Warcraft" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Oroville, California
1,853 posts, read 1,631,192 times
Reputation: 2234
Quote:
Originally Posted by WesternPilgrim View Post
You love Mexico and Christ but shrug at Catholicism? Sorry, that doesn't compute!
Being Christian (or Mexican for that matter) doesn't necessarily mean being Catholic. Thought that was painfully obvious.

My ratty town's name is easy enough - half Spanish and half French ("Oro" - gold, "Ville" - town).

A little trivia - both Sacramento and San Francisco were given their Spanish names by American settlers. Sacramento was originally Sutter's Fort and San Francisco was Yerba Buena. Modesto too. It was originally proposed to be named "Ralston" after an early California financier, but he was too "modest" and declined it being named after him.
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Old 01-30-2012, 03:45 AM
 
Location: The Other California
4,258 posts, read 2,489,284 times
Reputation: 1478
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeauCharles View Post
Being Christian (or Mexican for that matter) doesn't necessarily mean being Catholic. Thought that was painfully obvious.

My ratty town's name is easy enough - half Spanish and half French ("Oro" - gold, "Ville" - town).

A little trivia - both Sacramento and San Francisco were given their Spanish names by American settlers. Sacramento was originally Sutter's Fort and San Francisco was Yerba Buena. Modesto too. It was originally proposed to be named "Ralston" after an early California financier, but he was too "modest" and declined it being named after him.
Catholicism is in Mexico's blood. A Mexican either loves the Church or he hates it - but he never shrugs and he can never get away from it. The Mexican Protestants retain a great devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe. Even the most anti-Catholic Mexicans prefer to marry Catholic and die Catholic.

I know Oroville reasonably well, grew up nearby, and have friends in the area. Attend the state fiddle championships every year (as an observer). Nice town with lots of untapped potential.

Interesting story about Modesto: thanks for the info!
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Old 01-30-2012, 04:15 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland
25,352 posts, read 33,197,163 times
Reputation: 10743
Quote:
Originally Posted by WesternPilgrim View Post
Even the most anti-Catholic Mexicans prefer to marry Catholic and die Catholic.
That is, unless they have become truly converted to another faith.

Most of the people I know in Mexico City are not Catholic, and happily so.
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Old 01-30-2012, 07:38 AM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,585 posts, read 20,639,373 times
Reputation: 16147
My city's name, thankfully, has nothing to do with religious delusions and subjugation/murder of Native Americans. It means "fountain" in Italian.

EDIT: MOD CUT

Last edited by NewToCA; 01-31-2012 at 10:45 PM.. Reason: a bit excessive there
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