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Old 07-12-2013, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,691 posts, read 26,668,043 times
Reputation: 20267

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nullgeo View Post
And if Sheriff Joe says it, it's good enough for SOON2BNSURPRISE, right?

SOON, I was in the military, I am friends with ex-cons and visit a lifer in prison still. No prisoner lives a better life than the lowest person in the military. Period. And Sheriff Joe can shove it.

Find me a prisoner who can go out on pass / liberty and get drunk if he wants ... get married and live off the prison grounds in a private home ... own a car and go for a ride ... walk down to the store for an ice cream bar ... eat a burger 24/7 ... call his / her mom from his/her cell phone ... have a computer and internet to rot his/her mind with stupid games if that's what s/he desires ... earn a real paycheck and accrue retirement benefits ... enjoy the honor and appreciation of friends, family, and strangers coast to coast ... thrive on a sense of accomplishment and fulfillment ... how long a list would you like?
Good to hear. No prisoner should be able to have any kind of liberty. You read about how easy these animals have it and it is so good to hear that you say it is not as good as everyone is saying it is. Good to hear that they no longer make hooch or smoke weed in prison. Good to hear that cell phones are no longer smuggled in. Thank you for sharing how hard prison life has become.

It is also so nice to hear that our fighting forced were able to go out for a burger and ice cream while in the heat of battle in Iraq or Afghanistan. I had no idea that they had Burger and ice cream places over there. None of the guys that I work with or know that were there ever mentioned burger places or going out for an ice cream. Good to know that they were able to do that. Also good to know that they could live in their own home while living in Iraq. This has been so informative. Thank you for sharing that information.
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Old 07-12-2013, 09:43 AM
 
7,150 posts, read 8,773,379 times
Reputation: 3806
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
Good to hear. No prisoner should be able to have any kind of liberty. You read about how easy these animals have it and it is so good to hear that you say it is not as good as everyone is saying it is. Good to hear that they no longer make hooch or smoke weed in prison. Good to hear that cell phones are no longer smuggled in. Thank you for sharing how hard prison life has become.

It is also so nice to hear that our fighting forced were able to go out for a burger and ice cream while in the heat of battle in Iraq or Afghanistan. I had no idea that they had Burger and ice cream places over there. None of the guys that I work with or know that were there ever mentioned burger places or going out for an ice cream. Good to know that they were able to do that. Also good to know that they could live in their own home while living in Iraq. This has been so informative. Thank you for sharing that information.
Your level of misunderstanding is astounding.

A U.S. forces combatant enlists as a voluntary career choice.
If they are assigned to duties in a combat zone (such as Iraq was) they receive:
standard pay,
deployment pay (called different things in different services),
combat pay
sometimes hazardous duty pay as well
sometimes other special pays such as flight or jump pay
(when I served in combat forces I pulled down regular, combat, hazardous duty, and flight paychecks simultaneously)
There are also pay offsets for supporting a family and living off base, both when home and when deployed.
They earn generous retirement benefits.
They earn respect and honor and satisfaction.

And, by far, most of the time they do in their 20 - 30 years is right at home in the good ole' U.S. of A. where they are loved and appreciated.

Combat / foreign deployments last typically from 6-months to 14-months, depending on service and duties.
Some combatants are special forces that stay in-country ... some are inserted and extracted on short mission rotations.
Not only are the forces themselves covered fully for all medical, but their families are back home as well.
All servicemen/women are also government guaranteed for lifetime benefits in case of disability or death -- with benefits to family -- including everything kids need educationally through college assistance.

Except for in-country patrols and short-term forward actions, even bases on foreign soil are near luxurious these days ... yes, with ice cream and convenience stores ... personal cell phones and computers right in barracks ... movie theaters ... bowling alleys ... air-conditioning everywhere ... pretty damn good food, too. I can go on and on and on however much education you'd like. I was there. You weren't. Ever. In my combat / service days I didn't have nearly the level of luxury, convenience, or benefits that exists today -- but I still lived far better and happier than ANY prison inmate anywhere.

Smuggled cell phones, dope, and all the other crap you cite in prisons does not exist in any comfortable, nor common, degree. The few who pull off those acquisitions have to be the very top dogs and ready to fight to the death to prove it anytime. Contraband is bartered in return for power and [same] sex and safety from assault. Most live in tiny cells with two and three other prisoners and an open toilet and sink to share.

You and the Sheriff are out of your minds to compare. You've never been to either reality. I have. Both. Tell me what I don't know.
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Old 07-12-2013, 10:07 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,379,145 times
Reputation: 29064
The biggest surprise to me was looking at new barracks (having been "raised" in old, WW II, wooden, firetrap barracks with platoon-sized bays full of bunk beds with communal latrines (no dividers between toilets) and only lockers for clothes and footlockers for belongings. In the new barracks I found four-man rooms with individual beds, closets, desks and dressers, only two rooms sharing a bathroom, day rooms with televisions and snack and drink dispensers including one with beer choices, etc. Speaking of choices, modern mess halls with milk and soft drink dispensers, salad bars, standard foods with choices of entrees and sides and even short order and ethnic options. All that vs. whatever was slopped onto your tray. That was it.

I would imagine the accommodations and perks available to service members are even better today, and well they should be. Best of all there isn't anymore KP (not a fond memory). Our service men and women deserve whatever they get. People who haven't served, especially in combat zones, and put their lives on the line have no idea. But some of them sure do have opinions.

As for prisons, I worked in one for awhile. They are stark, dark, smelly, noisy, dirty, scary, dangerous, hot in summer, cold in winter, you name it. Living in one isn't living except for the severely institutionalized. It's merely existence and not much at that. Hamsters living in a cage with an exercise wheel have more freedom.

Last edited by Curmudgeon; 07-12-2013 at 10:28 AM..
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Old 07-12-2013, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,691 posts, read 26,668,043 times
Reputation: 20267
Quote:
Originally Posted by nullgeo View Post
Your level of misunderstanding is astounding.

A U.S. forces combatant enlists as a voluntary career choice.
If they are assigned to duties in a combat zone (such as Iraq was) they receive:
standard pay,
deployment pay (called different things in different services),
combat pay
sometimes hazardous duty pay as well
sometimes other special pays such as flight or jump pay
(when I served in combat forces I pulled down regular, combat, hazardous duty, and flight paychecks simultaneously)
There are also pay offsets for supporting a family and living off base, both when home and when deployed.
They earn generous retirement benefits.
They earn respect and honor and satisfaction.

And, by far, most of the time they do in their 20 - 30 years is right at home in the good ole' U.S. of A. where they are loved and appreciated.

Combat / foreign deployments last typically from 6-months to 14-months, depending on service and duties.
Some combatants are special forces that stay in-country ... some are inserted and extracted on short mission rotations.
Not only are the forces themselves covered fully for all medical, but their families are back home as well.
All servicemen/women are also government guaranteed for lifetime benefits in case of disability or death -- with benefits to family -- including everything kids need educationally through college assistance.

Except for in-country patrols and short-term forward actions, even bases on foreign soil are near luxurious these days ... yes, with ice cream and convenience stores ... personal cell phones and computers right in barracks ... movie theaters ... bowling alleys ... air-conditioning everywhere ... pretty damn good food, too. I can go on and on and on however much education you'd like. I was there. You weren't. Ever. In my combat / service days I didn't have nearly the level of luxury, convenience, or benefits that exists today -- but I still lived far better and happier than ANY prison inmate anywhere.

Smuggled cell phones, dope, and all the other crap you cite in prisons does not exist in any comfortable, nor common, degree. The few who pull off those acquisitions have to be the very top dogs and ready to fight to the death to prove it anytime. Contraband is bartered in return for power and [same] sex and safety from assault. Most live in tiny cells with two and three other prisoners and an open toilet and sink to share.

You and the Sheriff are out of your minds to compare. You've never been to either reality. I have. Both. Tell me what I don't know.
Very good to know. Thank you for the education. I guess all those stories of cell phone use from smuggled phones was incorrect. Good to know. Inmates should not have access to any of the things that we all enjoy on the outside. Inmates should not have rights given or offered to them. You are so right, I have never been to prison. I have no idea what it is like. I have no service record that you will ever read about. I guarentee that you will never read about me serving in any kind of action. I have nothing to tell about it or how it was in any of those places that you will never read about me being in. Since you will never read about my service record that does not exist, you are right in that I have no idea what so ever that I am talking about.

Saying all that, it should not matter. Prisoners should never live better than members of the service have to live. Since you have done your part to educate everyone on how it really is, I want to thank you for that. So good to know that prisoners have it harder than those serving our Nation. So very good to know.
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Old 07-12-2013, 10:20 AM
 
11,095 posts, read 10,139,886 times
Reputation: 20486
Quote:
Originally Posted by nullgeo View Post
Smuggled cell phones, dope, and all the other crap you cite in prisons does not exist in any comfortable, nor common, degree. The few who pull off those acquisitions have to be the very top dogs and ready to fight to the death to prove it anytime. Contraband is bartered in return for power and [same] sex and safety from assault. Most live in tiny cells with two and three other prisoners and an open toilet and sink to share.
It would appear that there IS a problem with smuggled contraband throughout the entire country, contrary to what you say.

https://www.prisonlegalnews.org/(S(d...ookieSupport=1
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Old 07-12-2013, 11:48 AM
 
17,432 posts, read 10,510,439 times
Reputation: 8328
Quote:
Originally Posted by nullgeo View Post

Smuggled cell phones, dope, and all the other crap you cite in prisons does not exist in any comfortable, nor common, degree. The few who pull off those acquisitions have to be the very top dogs and ready to fight to the death to prove it anytime. Contraband is bartered in return for power and [same] sex and safety from assault. Most live in tiny cells with two and three other prisoners and an open toilet and sink to share.

.
Well a friends son who just went to prison and is young and inexperienced, a "newby" to prison life (18 moths sentence) was in solitary last moth due to consuming alcohol ... made by cons in prison. Drugs were readily available to him, it isn't just the top dogs. Another friend who spent 8 years in a Fed Pen could have (but didn't) accessed all the alcohol and drugs he wanted. It is there and prevalent. Cost, a few stamps or other items of value in the pen. Anyone can access sit if they wish.
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Old 07-12-2013, 11:55 AM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,584 posts, read 33,669,032 times
Reputation: 16825
An ex-con friend of mine who did 4 years at Chino said it was easier to get drugs inside than it was outside.
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Old 07-12-2013, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,691 posts, read 26,668,043 times
Reputation: 20267
But you guys, nullgeo knows more about it than I do. He has a background in both serving our nation and in the prison system with the kind of people that he associates with. He has first hand experience that I do not have. I am thinking that others are not telling the truth about how things are in Prison. I for one have no real experience that I can talk about having to do with serving our nation and I have no experience at all with prisons. For now on I will leave it to the experts and others with real life experience such as nullgeo, to tell people how it is in Prison.
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Old 07-12-2013, 04:22 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,379,145 times
Reputation: 29064
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fontucky View Post
An ex-con friend of mine who did 4 years at Chino said it was easier to get drugs inside than it was outside.
It is and there's plenty of pruno (inmate made hooch) around as well. Other contraband gets inside in various ingenious ways and items like cell phones are brought in by prison staff members and sold for far above their value with the money often changing hands outside the prison walls. Many of the items end up in the hands of the inmates with the most "juice" as payment for safety or other favors.

Prisoners have 24 hours a day to figure out ways to beat the system and they're really good at it.
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Old 07-12-2013, 06:16 PM
 
7,150 posts, read 8,773,379 times
Reputation: 3806
Now y'all are getting kinda funny. Of course contraband gets into prisons. And in exactly what ways do any of you compare that with the freedoms and benefits and satisfaction in life that a member of the armed forces enjoys? Fill me in on the relative costs and dangers -- the price to be paid -- the freedom and pleasures of use. Sheriff Joe is full of crap. And anyone who listens to him and the rwkj AM radio shock-jocks that make their dirty money promulgating this nonsense should do the time inside it takes to figure out the reality ... should take about a few hours to know the difference.

Young men and women apply by the thousands and thousands every month for their dream of doing time in the military and making a career of it. Going to prison, not so much. Why? Guys and gals volunteer by the thousands to do combat tours for the pay, the pride, the excitement, the challenge, and the opportunity to serve their nation. Volunteering for prison, not so much.

Why?
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