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Old 07-22-2013, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,730 posts, read 5,263,033 times
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For some reason, the idea that Black Bears are not numerous in California or that they are not dangerous seems to be common. Both concepts are wrong. The population has sharply increased in recent decades to around 30,000 in the state, and that's a lot of bears. Blackies can and do kill humans, rarely, but it has happened. Sows defending cubs or larger males in deliberate predatory attacks can be deadly. However, the grizzly can be downright dangerous if sensible precautions are not taken. For just one example of the difference between the two bears, take shooing a nuisance bear away. Often we hear about a homeowner chasing away a blackie in their backyard by running at it, shouting and waving arms, or some such similar tactics. Try doing that with a 600 pound middle aged male grizzly and it would quite likely get you killed. Also forget about the household pooch or pooches being any good. Blackies do not like to mix it up with dogs as a rule, and will usually flee if they can, but once again, grizzlys can be a different story. A big male can take a kill away from an entire wolf pack, so that kind of gives you the idea.
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Old 07-23-2013, 09:50 AM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,059,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
For some reason, the idea that Black Bears are not numerous in California or that they are not dangerous seems to be common. Both concepts are wrong. The population has sharply increased in recent decades to around 30,000 in the state, and that's a lot of bears. Blackies can and do kill humans, rarely, but it has happened. Sows defending cubs or larger males in deliberate predatory attacks can be deadly. However, the grizzly can be downright dangerous if sensible precautions are not taken. For just one example of the difference between the two bears, take shooing a nuisance bear away. Often we hear about a homeowner chasing away a blackie in their backyard by running at it, shouting and waving arms, or some such similar tactics. Try doing that with a 600 pound middle aged male grizzly and it would quite likely get you killed. Also forget about the household pooch or pooches being any good. Blackies do not like to mix it up with dogs as a rule, and will usually flee if they can, but once again, grizzlys can be a different story. A big male can take a kill away from an entire wolf pack, so that kind of gives you the idea.
Got Weatherby?

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Old 07-23-2013, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,730 posts, read 5,263,033 times
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Originally Posted by SETI_listener View Post
Following the re-speciation of the Gray Wolf to Yellowstone by using a larger subspecies of the exinct Yellowstone Wolf, the Canadian Gray Wolf.
Off topic, but should mention that some hard nosed scientists say that this is bunk, a fabrication of the anti wolf lobby. They say that the original Northern Rocky wolf, Canis Lupus Irremotus, was just as large as the introduced Mackenzie Valley wolf, C. L. Occidentalis.
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Old 07-23-2013, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Glendale, CA
1,298 posts, read 2,103,578 times
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Not sure where the idea that Black Bears were extinct in California came from. Two stories just from the local news recently:

Glendale's Rose Parade float might honor Meatball the bear - latimes.com

Game warden rescues baby bear from Azusa dumpster - SGVTribune.com
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Old 07-23-2013, 07:57 PM
 
389 posts, read 484,805 times
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Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
Off topic, but should mention that some hard nosed scientists say that this is bunk, a fabrication of the anti wolf lobby. They say that the original Northern Rocky wolf, Canis Lupus Irremotus, was just as large as the introduced Mackenzie Valley wolf, C. L. Occidentalis.
Cool, good to know! The wolf re-speciation experiment was my logic in selecting the Kodiak grizzly for California. I read the California Brown Bear was pretty big. Didn't want to short change the citizens of the Golden State.
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Old 07-23-2013, 07:58 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
77,945 posts, read 69,884,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DynamoLA View Post
Not sure where the idea that Black Bears were extinct in California came from. Two stories just from the local news recently:
It came from a film I saw on TV about the last California Black Bear, who lived sometime back in the 1940's or 50's. I guess it was wrong.
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Old 07-24-2013, 11:25 AM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,059,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DynamoLA View Post
Not sure where the idea that Black Bears were extinct in California came from. Two stories just from the local news recently:

Glendale's Rose Parade float might honor Meatball the bear - latimes.com

Game warden rescues baby bear from Azusa dumpster - SGVTribune.com
What you all are experiencing now in the Southland will also start happening here in the core Bay Area.

The range has already reached the Northern suburbs and the Monterey Bay cities. It is inevitable.
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Old 07-24-2013, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,730 posts, read 5,263,033 times
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Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
It came from a film I saw on TV about the last California Black Bear, who lived sometime back in the 1940's or 50's. I guess it was wrong.
It was wrong. Might be a good time to get the species and common names of bears straightened out. The American Black Bear, Ursus Americanus, is found over most of North America. There are several subspecies, with minor differences. It was always common in California, and has never been endangered. This bear can be many other colors besides black, and black bears that are quite brown are common, thus adding a bit of confusion.

The grizzly bear, Ursus Arctos Horribilis, is a subspecies of the Brown Bear, Ursus Arctos, of which subspecies are found all over the world. The last grizzly in California is believed to have been shot in 1922. The Alaskan Brown Bear is classified as the coastal grizzly, the same animal as it's inland grizzly cousin, even though these animals tend to be much heavier than the inland bears, not as a separate subspecies. The Kodiak Bear is recognized as a distinct subspecies, U. A. Middendorffi. No need to go into polar bears here. Now, wasn't that easy? Bears all in order?
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Old 07-24-2013, 01:55 PM
 
7,150 posts, read 8,772,061 times
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I still like bares better.
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Old 07-24-2013, 02:22 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,467,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
It was wrong. Might be a good time to get the species and common names of bears straightened out. The American Black Bear, Ursus Americanus, is found over most of North America. There are several subspecies, with minor differences. It was always common in California, and has never been endangered. This bear can be many other colors besides black, and black bears that are quite brown are common, thus adding a bit of confusion.

The grizzly bear, Ursus Arctos Horribilis, is a subspecies of the Brown Bear, Ursus Arctos, of which subspecies are found all over the world. The last grizzly in California is believed to have been shot in 1922. The Alaskan Brown Bear is classified as the coastal grizzly, the same animal as it's inland grizzly cousin, even though these animals tend to be much heavier than the inland bears, not as a separate subspecies. The Kodiak Bear is recognized as a distinct subspecies, U. A. Middendorffi. No need to go into polar bears here. Now, wasn't that easy? Bears all in order?
Thank you. It also was claimed previously on this thread that Grizzlies were not Brown Bears. Horribilis.
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