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Old 05-06-2015, 01:17 AM
 
Location: Fort Liquordale, Florida
244 posts, read 246,771 times
Reputation: 289

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How about Miserville? It's 38 miles east of Bakersfield and 200 miles NW of Joshua Tree!

Just kidding..............

In all seriousness what did you do with all your money? The money you worked all your life for? Where is it? Did SHE get it?
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Old 05-07-2015, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Mountains of Oregon
15,069 posts, read 17,034,100 times
Reputation: 10267
Fort Mohave, right on the AZ border.
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Old 05-11-2015, 10:48 AM
 
77 posts, read 63,671 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulemutt View Post
You maintain that adding more and more housing to areas already densely populated serves quality of life.
Those opposing increasing density say otherwise.

You know who really drives the development of new housing?
Developers.
Because it enriches them. Not because it improves quality of life.
Selling the dream to unquestioning minds.
Yeah, let's keep endlessly growing and expanding!
It'll be fun! Well never run out of resources!
We can learn to love living like sardines in cans!
Why, why are you questioning the goodness of high density living?.... the humans had evolved from apes, and it's only natural for apes to live in high-density, picking the feas from each other, fighting for a banana, you know...you must be some kind of anti-darwinist.

Also, you're inconsiderate towards the elite/the "masters" of this society...the ones that pull the puppet strings: they need the sheep to be in pens and be revenue-producing. The more sheep = more revenue, and more sheep = the smaller pens. It makes sense to concentrate the "human resources" for controllability... How do you think them poor things will be getting richer if you disperse the population??

Anyway, your concerns for future generations are unfounded. After the wave of brainwash while being glued to smartphones, they'll be quite happy with a tiny pen and a chance to go camping to park a couple of times a year and probably will consider the idea of anyone living on acrege strange. Some kind of weird wealthy hermits. A creature grown in captivity doesn't resent it--with fair amount of social engineering effort (that had been under way since early previous century), it'll be quite easy to convince people that the urban lifestyle is the only acceptable one.

Last edited by opossum1; 05-11-2015 at 10:59 AM..
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Old 05-16-2015, 11:11 AM
 
Location: San Diego
32,799 posts, read 30,034,103 times
Reputation: 17687
Quote:
Originally Posted by opossum1 View Post
Why, why are you questioning the goodness of high density living?.... the humans had evolved from apes, and it's only natural for apes to live in high-density, picking the feas from each other, fighting for a banana, you know...you must be some kind of anti-darwinist.

Also, you're inconsiderate towards the elite/the "masters" of this society...the ones that pull the puppet strings: they need the sheep to be in pens and be revenue-producing. The more sheep = more revenue, and more sheep = the smaller pens. It makes sense to concentrate the "human resources" for controllability... How do you think them poor things will be getting richer if you disperse the population??

Anyway, your concerns for future generations are unfounded. After the wave of brainwash while being glued to smartphones, they'll be quite happy with a tiny pen and a chance to go camping to park a couple of times a year and probably will consider the idea of anyone living on acrege strange. Some kind of weird wealthy hermits. A creature grown in captivity doesn't resent it--with fair amount of social engineering effort (that had been under way since early previous century), it'll be quite easy to convince people that the urban lifestyle is the only acceptable one.
We are already there. They have buses from inner schools take field trips to the beach. Many have never been to the beach and it's less than 5 - 10 miles away.
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Old 05-16-2015, 11:33 AM
 
77 posts, read 63,671 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1AngryTaxPayer View Post
We are already there. They have buses from inner schools take field trips to the beach. Many have never been to the beach and it's less than 5 - 10 miles away.
There was an article on kids who didn't know that vegetables were grown in the ground....they thought they were manufactured. Somehow, living in a rat cage packed with fuming vehicles, smog and unnatural noizes, breathing someone's dryer's exhaust/chemicals, etc became a "norm"--over a very short time/one century. There's a new breed of human who can't do any real tasks and is dependent on various technology--god help if someone pulls a plug on utilities one day. There're still a chance to escape in our day and age...future generations might not have it.

Last edited by opossum1; 05-16-2015 at 11:52 AM..
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Old 10-22-2015, 02:29 AM
 
Location: Southwest
670 posts, read 565,141 times
Reputation: 728
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
The problem with liberal cities isn't just the taxes. It's that they practically refuse to build any housing in the name of "quality of life", which drives up home prices and rents and effectively shuts out the middle class and anyone not lucky enough to win the subsidized housing lottery (if you consider living in subsidized housing "lucky").

Why Middle-Class Americans Can't Afford to Live in Liberal Cities - The Atlantic
The liberal cities I lived in are covered with new developments and housing, with almost all green spaces gone. It's impossible to stop developers and builders.

No, I don't consider living in subsidized housing lucky because cities (like Portland, OR for instance) try to do the right thing by having subsidized housing throughout the city, but then turn running them over to shark property management companies who run them like slum lords, with no respect for the tenants or their safety, cheating them, and forcing them to pay too high rents for small spaces that are run down. Building the housing isn't enough. There needs to be continued oversight and accountability, too, to protect the citizens they are intended for.
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Old 10-22-2015, 02:46 AM
 
Location: Southwest
670 posts, read 565,141 times
Reputation: 728
Default Agree about Orcutt

Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post
Orcutt outside of Santa Maria can be had for little, especially a mobile home. Orcutt has a library, and Santa Maria has everything else. Sample of real estate:

http://www.realtor.com/realestateand...000/sby-1?ml=4

Lompoc is another city to consider. It too has a library.
I wouldn't want to live in Lompoc, but I agree with you about Orcutt. Orcutt is a cute little town, and it has a lovely library. I doubt that it is liberal, because most towns in the region aren't, but it is nice nevertheless and the people are pretty friendly. The schools are reported to be good, too- better than the schools in Lompoc and Santa Maria. People with money have moved to and are fixing up Orcutt to get away from Lompoc and Santa Maria ( a combination of white flight and not wanting to live in impoverished areas with bad schools).

San Luis Obispo looks like a great place to live. A lovely historical old downtown, a college, a mission downtown, more amenities than in Orcutt or Santa Maria, and of course, a library. I suspect that since there is more money there than in the other towns and cities along that part of central coastal California, it is a more liberal city than the others near it, but also more expensive to live there.
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Old 10-25-2015, 11:56 AM
 
8 posts, read 8,132 times
Reputation: 10
I would suggest the Humboldt County, to be honest. When I visited Humboldt State there were the hippies/druggies, college students, few families, and old people. It's very peaceful and cheap too compared to the rest of California.
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Old 12-01-2015, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Southwest
670 posts, read 565,141 times
Reputation: 728
Default If you're still looking...

Check out San Louis Obispo and Arroyo Grande. The first might be more liberal and expensive (a college town and people with money live there, too), but Arroyo Grande isn't that far from San Louis Obispo and it has really been fixed up into a cute little town. For that to happen, there has to be some "thinkers" there.

Orcutt is about 40 minutes from San Louis Obispo and smaller than Arroyo Grande (Arroyo Grande is between San Louis Obispo and Orcutt), but it has a nice little old town, a good sized library for the town's size, and it is easy to get to both Old Town Orcutt and New Town Orcutt (where the banks, big grocery/drug stores, and other businesses are). Orcutt is growing, too, as new businesses are still going in. It's not riddled with liberals, but there is a decent mix.

Further east from those towns into wine country are Santa Ynez and Los Olivos. Santa Ynez is a decidedly western town and I have no idea the political leanings of the locals, but it's probably a mix with a lean to the right. Really nice looking little town, though, if you're at all into western. Los Olivos is really nice and heavily wine and olive tourist industry focused. It has a beautiful, big church there that appears to be moderate to left leaning, and the town is so nice that I suspect there are more progressive people there than in most towns in small-town-California.

It is probably more expensive to live in Los Olivos than in Santa Ynez. Between those two small towns, though, is gorgeous horse ranch country and at least one teeny little town (I remember Ballard, but I can't remember for sure if there is another one also). Very rural, very pretty, and low-population. Cost of housing might be less expensive while still pretty close to the other towns.

Finally, if you are interested in a very small town with little there, I was in Los Alamos and the deli/tea cafe I ate lunch in had a sign up from the city asking for creative, artist types to move there and help grow it into a more happening place. I thought that was interesting! Right now it is a one-horse town, just a few blocks on one main street, but it does have what looks like some newer, nice businesses, and from the sign it appears the town has a vision for itself that, if it succeeds, could make it a great place to live. In the meantime, a person would probably have to drive to one of the other towns for more amenities and a decent-sized library.

Oh, I forgot that there is always Santa Barbara, but a lot of monied people live there so the cost-of-living is probably pretty high, especially for housing.
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Old 12-03-2015, 08:53 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 30,327,697 times
Reputation: 28965
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgrdr View Post
Finally, if you are interested in a very small town with little there, I was in Los Alamos and the deli/tea café I ate lunch in had a sign up from the city asking for creative, artist types to move there and help grow it into a more happening place.
Memo to self: Scratch Los Alamos. Blah! "Happening" places make hillbilly conclaves look good.
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