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Old 06-25-2016, 12:34 PM
 
Location: "Silicon Valley" (part of San Francisco Bay Area, California, USA)
4,375 posts, read 3,775,354 times
Reputation: 2147

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Diablo Canyon produced 2160 MW.

There is a total of 1198 MW of solar currently planned or under construction in California, in terms of central power plants (as opposed to solar arrays on the roofs of buildings).

Solar Energy Projects in California

under per-construction = 485 MW
on hold before construction = 713 MW

654 MW of wind power and 40 MW of geothermal are planned on BLM land in California.

Approved Renewable Energy Projects - Bureau of Land Management California
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Old 06-25-2016, 12:38 PM
 
Location: "Silicon Valley" (part of San Francisco Bay Area, California, USA)
4,375 posts, read 3,775,354 times
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There is a plan for an offshore wind farm near San Luis Obispo that would produce 1000 MW of power.

California's first offshore wind farm proposed near Hearst Castle - San Jose Mercury News
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Old 06-25-2016, 03:58 PM
509
 
5,481 posts, read 5,984,531 times
Reputation: 7948
Quote:
Originally Posted by neutrino78x View Post
509, 1.5 kW is a very small system. You need at least 3.0 kW for your setup. It is expensive but it can be done. Many do it.
1.5 Kw is perfect. We are NOT urban people that waste energy like that Aussie couple!! What on earth do they waste all that energy on???

AGAIN, you cannot use solar with ANYTHING that has a heating element for any period of time. Notice those Aussie's do not have a electric clothes dryer. They don't mention how they heat their hot water. It is NOT with their solar panels. Notice they heat the house with wood. That's fine.

But again, when you add up their energy use......is their house solar or gas plus wood. Their energy hog needs are being met with something else than solar.

Our "small" 1.5 Kw system is up to 30,000 dollars with no tax breaks. Off-grid homes only get minor if any tax breaks. But come and rent our vacation home and see how it works! This is the view from our back door.



We are up in eastern Washington so between Feb and November we generate excess electricity. The generator never runs during that period of time.

The cloudy weather shows up about mid-November and ends about the start of Feb. During this period of time we have about FOUR hours of solar possible during the day due to how far north we are and the mountains around the house. That is when the generator runs start.

So you can see that increasing the size of our solar array makes no sense.

On Diablo Canyon...since the plant generate 18,000 Gw-h of base load electricity...how many natural gas generating plants will California need to build to replace the electricity. I might be missing something but it looks like Diablo Canyon generates just slightly less power than Grand Coulee Dam. That is a LOT of electricty to make up....8-10% of California's electrical load.

I see the statistics on solar and wind, but that is NOT base load capacity AND statistics from the NW are showing that for us USED wind capacity is 5-10% of predicted generating capacity. Here are the generating and consumption statistics for BPA which covers Washington, Idaho, and most of Oregon and Montana. Statistics show for every five minutes.

http://transmission.bpa.gov/business...ind/baltwg.png As you can see from the graph most of the wind power in the Northwest is PAID for at 3 cents a kilo-watt hour by BPA rate payers and then dumped since there is no market for it particularly in the spring.

Where is California going to get it?? Has anybody heard the solution to that??

Last edited by 509; 06-25-2016 at 04:11 PM..
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Old 06-25-2016, 04:48 PM
 
Location: "Silicon Valley" (part of San Francisco Bay Area, California, USA)
4,375 posts, read 3,775,354 times
Reputation: 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by 509 View Post
1.5 Kw is perfect. We are NOT urban people that waste energy like that Aussie couple!! What on earth do they waste all that energy on???
They use on the devices for which you are burning propane. They use the solar instead.

Clearly your 1.5 kW isn't perfect, because you are using propane for certain devices.

Quote:
They don't mention how they heat their hot water. It is NOT with their solar panels.
Yes it is.

Rheem Electric Tank Water Heaters

You didn't really think there is no such thing as an electric water heater did you? There are tankless electric water heaters too, the Australian house probably uses that, actually.

Quote:
On Diablo Canyon...since the plant generate 18,000 Gw-h of base load electricity...how many natural gas generating plants will California need to build to replace the electricity.
That's annual, dude. In any given moment it is only producing about 2.2 GW or less of power output (2000 MW). That's less than 10% of all the power needed in California. So to replace it you just need to make a series of power plants that output a total of 2.2 GW.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diablo_Canyon_Power_Plant

We don't have power plants that put out 18,000 GW of power every second lmao...

Most of that will replaced with solar, some with wind, some with geothermal.

Some will be replaced with the off shore wind facility that is planned for the future.

Of course, all new single family homes should be required to have solar power on the roof, and high rises should have to start replacing their windows with solar windows.

This fully transparent solar cell could make every window and screen a power source (updated) | ExtremeTech

Or use this company's special coating that is transparent but generates solar power:

SolarWindow - Clearly Electric

They also have solar paint.

High-efficiency spray-on solar power tech can turn any surface into a cheap solar cell | ExtremeTech

More power comes to the Earth in the form of electromagnetic radiation from the Sun than man will use in the foreseeable future. Really we could power the entire country if used 300 square miles of the desert in Nevada for solar power.

How Much Land Would it Take to Power the US via Solar? | Ramez Naam

Then the other plants would just be redundancy. Of course that would be expensive to build, so we're choosing to go with distributed power.
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Old 06-29-2016, 04:21 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
21,132 posts, read 21,117,071 times
Reputation: 21058
That place brings back a lot of memories. I worked for a company in 2011-2012 that was a vendor to PG&E DCNPP and traveled there once a month, at least. I would drive 4 hours from my home in the Bay Area and check-in at the Holiday Inn in SLO. Then, go grab dinner at Tahoe Joe's steakhouse. In the morning, travel south on 101 to Avila Beach to Diablo Canyon.

At the gate, the sentries knew me and once I passed the sentries, drove the isolated 2 lane road (no traffic) along some of the most beautiful, isolated, beachfront in Central California. It was about an 8 mile drive into the power plant. once I arrived, your social security number and ID were checked. Sentries in AR-15's were constantly patrolling the area.
I loved visiting as the views of the Pacific Ocean and the staff were marvelous. I also had a nice, peaceful drive back home that day on 101 north, after my visit.
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Old 07-03-2016, 12:46 AM
 
Location: "Silicon Valley" (part of San Francisco Bay Area, California, USA)
4,375 posts, read 3,775,354 times
Reputation: 2147
Recently I noticed that they are building what appears to be a solar panel farm near the Capitol exit and Capitol Light Rail station on Highway 87 in San Jose. I will try and get a pic next time. I go by there on light rail each day that I go to work.

I looked it up and it appears to be associated with this project:

https://www.sccgov.org/sites/faf/cp/...e-parkway.aspx

The total output is approximately 2 MW. It is located on the highway shoulder between the highway and the soundwall.

It looks like maybe 1/4 of a mile long. If we made one thousand such installations, we would approximate the power output of Diablo Canyon.
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Old 09-18-2021, 02:23 AM
 
14,455 posts, read 14,853,143 times
Reputation: 7620
Quote:
Originally Posted by 509 View Post
On Diablo Canyon...since the plant generate 18,000 Gw-h of base load electricity...how many natural gas generating plants will California need to build to replace the electricity. I might be missing something but it looks like Diablo Canyon generates just slightly less power than Grand Coulee Dam. That is a LOT of electricty to make up....8-10% of California's electrical load.
Electric Power plants can be rated by capacity or by the amount of electricity they produce in a year. Grand Coulee has by far the biggest capacity of any electric power plant in the country of any energy source, but they produce electricity at only 35% of capacity over the year.

Nuclear power, natural gas, and coal generate electricity at a high capacity factor. There are no plants that use renewable energy in the top 50 in the nation because capacity factors are so low.

There are only three plants on this list that are part of the Western Interconnect.
  1. Palo Verde 31,097 Nuclear (PWR) Arizona
  2. Browns Ferry 25,398 Nuclear (BWR) Alabama
  3. Peach Bottom 21,680 Nuclear (BWR) Pennsylvania
  4. Oconee 21,294 Nuclear (PWR) South Carolina
  5. Grand Coulee 21,043 Hydro (Hybrid) Washington
  6. South Texas Project 20,688 Nuclear (PWR) Texas
  7. Comanche Peak 20,498 Nuclear (PWR) Texas
  8. Susquehanna 20,469 Nuclear (BWR) Pennsylvania
  9. Byron 20,051 Nuclear (PWR) Illinois
  10. Alvin W. Vogtle 19,959 Nuclear (PWR) Georgia
  11. McGuire 19,862 Nuclear (PWR) North Carolina
  12. West County 19,841 Natural gas Florida
  13. Turkey Point 19,812 Nuclear (PWR) Florida
  14. LaSalle County 19,346 Nuclear (BWR) Illinois
  15. Braidwood 19,343 Nuclear (PWR) Illinois
  16. Limerick 19,339 Nuclear (BWR) Pennsylvania
  17. Salem 18,895 Nuclear (PWR) New Jersey
  18. Catawba 18,780 Nuclear (PWR) South Carolina
  19. Watts Bar 18,473 Nuclear (PWR) Tennessee
  20. James H. Miller Jr. 18,325 Coal Alabama
  21. Diablo Canyon 18,214 Nuclear (PWR) California
  22. Sequoyah 17,704 Nuclear (PWR) Tennessee
  23. Gibson 17,632 Coal Indiana
  24. Donald C. Cook 17,611 Nuclear (PWR) Michigan
  25. Millstone 16,881 Nuclear (PWR) Connecticut
  26. Robert Moses Niagara 16,773 Hydro (Reservoir) New York
  27. Monroe 16,458 Coal Michigan
  28. Indian Point 16,366 Nuclear (PWR) New York
  29. North Anna 16,035 Nuclear (PWR) Virginia
  30. General James M. Gavin 16,006 Coal Ohio
  31. W. A. Parish 15,851 Coal (73.8%) Texas
  32. Labadie 15,766 Coal Missouri
  33. St. Lucie 15,563 Nuclear (PWR) Florida
  34. Dresden 15,538 Nuclear (BWR) Illinois
  35. Quad Cities 15,476 Nuclear (BWR) Illinois
  36. Robert W. Scherer 15,420 Coal Georgia
  37. Nine Mile Point 15,383 Nuclear (BWR) New York
  38. Calvert Cliffs 14,988 Nuclear (PWR) Maryland
  39. Beaver Valley 14,653 Nuclear (PWR) Pennsylvania
  40. Brunswick 14,627 Nuclear (BWR) North Carolina
  41. Edwin I. Hatch 14,404 Nuclear (BWR) Georgia
  42. Joseph M. Farley 14,065 Nuclear (PWR) Alabama
  43. Martin Lake 14,050 Coal Texas
  44. Bowen 13,620 Coal Georgia
  45. Hines Energy Complex 13,368 Natural gas Florida
  46. Surry 13,219 Nuclear (PWR) Virginia
  47. John E. Amos 12,985 Coal West Virginia
  48. Martin 12,882 Natural gas (96.6%) Florida
  49. Arkansas Nuclear One 12,721 Nuclear (PWR) Arkansas
  50. Sherburne County 12,478 Coal Minnesota
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Old 09-18-2021, 06:32 AM
 
14,455 posts, read 14,853,143 times
Reputation: 7620


Westlands Solar Park near Fresno will have a 2000 MW capacity. It will be completed about the same time as the 2256 MW capacity reactors at Diablo Canyon are shut down.

But Westlands (probably 20% to 30% capacity factor) will never produce nearly as much electricity as Diablo Canyon ( ~90% capacity factor).
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Old 09-18-2021, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Sylmar, a part of Los Angeles
7,669 posts, read 5,225,107 times
Reputation: 16136
And the moron Democrats want to stop new gas car sales in a few years with inadequacy electricity.
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