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Old 08-05-2017, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,431 posts, read 3,615,844 times
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I understand the weather differences. I am more interested in COL, job growth, culture, things to do, etc.
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Old 08-05-2017, 08:04 PM
 
7,289 posts, read 4,383,643 times
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Do you plan to buy or rent? What is your approximate budget for housing? What type of "job" are you going to be looking for? What type of things do you like to do -- hiking, nightlife, golf, photography, going to museums, etc? Where are you moving from, and why are these two cities (and very different climates) on your radar?

You see the problem with answering questions like this -- my idea of a fun place to live may not be yours. So, the more information you can share with us about your expectations, the better people here will be able to advise you.

But, we can talk in broad terms about cost of living using some data.

Let's assume you plan to buy. Oceanside real estate is less expensive than many other areas in San Diego County, but it's still not cheap, and it's also more expensive then Palm Springs.

Some data points from Zillow.com:

In June, the median list price of homes in Oceanside (including condos, single family homes, and manufactured homes) was $529,000. (Average per square foot was $308).

In Palm Springs, the median list price of homes in June (again, including all types) was $409,000. (Average per square foot was $244).

It's important to note that for at least four to five months of the year, your utility costs will be higher in Palm Springs, as you'll likely need/want to use some form of cooling (AC or Swamp Coolers) when it is 100+ degrees. You'll only need AC infrequently in Oceanside.

Property taxes will be similar thanks to Prop 13 (there may be some voter approved bonds that make one more expensive than the other and some housing tracts have those pesky Mello Roos fees).

If you're going to be renting, the comparison gets a little closer. Again according to Zillow, the median rent in Oceanside in June was $2295 (that's for all sizes of rentals) while in PS it was $2185.

Keep in mind, of course, that there are more expensive areas surrounding both Oceanside AND Palm Springs, and these are only medians, which means just a snapshot.

Also, there are other factors you might want to compare, such as crime. A good way to do that is to go to the site Crimemapping.com which will show you reported crime in any area. First, enter the address where you currently live so you'll have a baseline for comparison. Set the date to the last six months (otherwise, you only get a week). Then, do a search for both Oceanside and PS. I mention this because there is some gang activity in Oceanside and some areas are less safe than others; I don't know enough about crime in Palm Springs, but I'm sure it's similar there. So, do include this into your research if you will be looking for housing in less expensive parts of both towns.

Finally, you didn't mention why you've zeroed in on these two cities. But, if you're looking for something in between Palm Springs and Oceanside in terms of location, cost, and weather, you might want to look at the lovely communities of Temecula, Murietta, and perhaps Menifee, just over the Riverside County border with San Diego. And, obviously, if desert living is your preference, there are many alternatives to Palm Springs that have plenty to do and perhaps even a little cheaper cost of living (examples: Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Southern Utah, etc.) that might be worth a look.

Hope this gets you started!

Last edited by RosieSD; 08-05-2017 at 08:14 PM..
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Old 08-05-2017, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,431 posts, read 3,615,844 times
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Thank you...good info
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Old 08-06-2017, 12:37 AM
 
7,289 posts, read 4,383,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
Thank you...good info
In terms of things to do, the weather is a big factor. For at least five months out of the year in PS, you're limited to early morning if you want to do outside activities (like golf or hiking) during the day, unless you're OK with trudging around in 107 degree plus weather. Of course, if your idea of fun is drinking in an air conditioned bar all day, this is a moot issue.

I live in SD County (inland, not by the coast) and I love the desert. I spend a lot of time out in the desert from November until April. But, as much as I love the desert, I take a looooooooong break from it when the temps read 100+ for months on end. Sure, it's a dry heat, but 107 still feels mighty hot even if it's a "dry heat."

Other people don't mind the heat. They hunker down during most of the daylight hours, emerging like coyotes when the sun goes down, and getting up early to hit the golf course before 9 am.

I guess my main advice would be to spend several weeks, or better yet, a full month from June to October in Palm Springs and see if you're really a desert rat or not.

If you decide that you ARE a desert rat, and cost of living is a concern, then I'd take a serious look at other desert areas too, rather than just Palm Springs. Phoenix, Las Vegas, Albuquerque, Tuscon are much larger cities than Palm Springs and might be good options for a desert rat who is asking about things to do and cost of living. I also really like St. George Utah -- nice city a little bigger than PS, and close to tons of outdoor activities. Lots of retirees there. If you don't like the Vegas area, check out Mesquite, Nevada -- big retirement community there.

In San Diego County, Borrego Springs is a nice little desert community surrounded by thousands of acres of the beautiful Anza Borrego State Park -- housing prices are significantly cheaper than PS there. Or, check out the Antelope Valley, another desert area in California (there are other options as well).

But, should you decide (after spending time in the summer months in PS) that you're not a desert rat, then maybe look at places like Temecula, where you still have warm weather, but not that HOT, and where you also are closer to the coast for a quick escape when you want one.

The coast, of course, is always nice. Living by the ocean is pretty much everyone's dream. But, the truth is, no where in Southern California "on the coast" is going to be inexpensive (even Oceanside). Go just a bit inland to places like La Mesa or Chula Vista (especially the eastern edges) or Rancho San Diego, Rancho Bernardo, San Marcos, Poway, Alpine. Then, you have lower prices plus moderate weather in comparison to the desert, plus probably more access to a variety of things to do, jobs, and the coast.

If you want coastal living, however, then Southern California coastal living will come with a price tag. There are also less expensive areas for coastal living than Southern California -- Oregon, Florida, Texas (Gulf Coast), South Carolina, North Carolina, Maryland, Delaware, even parts of Northern California (away from the Bay area) etc.

Tip: if you want coastal in California but don't have the budget for it, in addition to Oceanside check out Imperial Beach in SD County, Ventura and Oxnard in Ventura County, the Central Coast of California, and the more far reaching Northern California communities (Eureka, Arcata, etc.)

Again, I don't know where you're moving from, and why you've zeroed in on Oceanside and Palm Springs, but the best way to decide if a place is the right idea for retirement is put boots on the ground for a SIGNIFICANT amount of time when the weather is at its worst.

By the way, you may also want to check out the City Data Retirement forum -- you may find some people who have additional insights and information about choosing a retirement location there. Pick their brains about what they considered when they decided on a retirement location. There are some GREAT folks in that sub-forum.

Good luck with your decision!

Last edited by RosieSD; 08-06-2017 at 12:46 AM..
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Old 08-06-2017, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA, USA 92509
1,377 posts, read 1,037,030 times
Reputation: 678
Quote:
Originally Posted by RosieSD View Post
In terms of things to do, the weather is a big factor. For at least five months out of the year in PS, you're limited to early morning if you want to do outside activities (like golf or hiking) during the day, unless you're OK with trudging around in 107 degree plus weather. Of course, if your idea of fun is drinking in an air conditioned bar all day, this is a moot issue.

I live in SD County (inland, not by the coast) and I love the desert. I spend a lot of time out in the desert from November until April. But, as much as I love the desert, I take a looooooooong break from it when the temps read 100+ for months on end. Sure, it's a dry heat, but 107 still feels mighty hot even if it's a "dry heat."

Other people don't mind the heat. They hunker down during most of the daylight hours, emerging like coyotes when the sun goes down, and getting up early to hit the golf course before 9 am.

I guess my main advice would be to spend several weeks, or better yet, a full month from June to October in Palm Springs and see if you're really a desert rat or not.

If you decide that you ARE a desert rat, and cost of living is a concern, then I'd take a serious look at other desert areas too, rather than just Palm Springs. Phoenix, Las Vegas, Albuquerque, Tuscon are much larger cities than Palm Springs and might be good options for a desert rat who is asking about things to do and cost of living. I also really like St. George Utah -- nice city a little bigger than PS, and close to tons of outdoor activities. Lots of retirees there. If you don't like the Vegas area, check out Mesquite, Nevada -- big retirement community there.

In San Diego County, Borrego Springs is a nice little desert community surrounded by thousands of acres of the beautiful Anza Borrego State Park -- housing prices are significantly cheaper than PS there. Or, check out the Antelope Valley, another desert area in California (there are other options as well).

But, should you decide (after spending time in the summer months in PS) that you're not a desert rat, then maybe look at places like Temecula, where you still have warm weather, but not that HOT, and where you also are closer to the coast for a quick escape when you want one.

The coast, of course, is always nice. Living by the ocean is pretty much everyone's dream. But, the truth is, no where in Southern California "on the coast" is going to be inexpensive (even Oceanside). Go just a bit inland to places like La Mesa or Chula Vista (especially the eastern edges) or Rancho San Diego, Rancho Bernardo, San Marcos, Poway, Alpine. Then, you have lower prices plus moderate weather in comparison to the desert, plus probably more access to a variety of things to do, jobs, and the coast.

If you want coastal living, however, then Southern California coastal living will come with a price tag. There are also less expensive areas for coastal living than Southern California -- Oregon, Florida, Texas (Gulf Coast), South Carolina, North Carolina, Maryland, Delaware, even parts of Northern California (away from the Bay area) etc.

Tip: if you want coastal in California but don't have the budget for it, in addition to Oceanside check out Imperial Beach in SD County, Ventura and Oxnard in Ventura County, the Central Coast of California, and the more far reaching Northern California communities (Eureka, Arcata, etc.)

Again, I don't know where you're moving from, and why you've zeroed in on Oceanside and Palm Springs, but the best way to decide if a place is the right idea for retirement is put boots on the ground for a SIGNIFICANT amount of time when the weather is at its worst.

By the way, you may also want to check out the City Data Retirement forum -- you may find some people who have additional insights and information about choosing a retirement location there. Pick their brains about what they considered when they decided on a retirement location. There are some GREAT folks in that sub-forum.

Good luck with your decision!
No, it's not. The desert is amazing, though! JMO.
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Old 08-07-2017, 12:05 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,059,895 times
Reputation: 10906
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
I understand the weather differences. I am more interested in COL, job growth, culture, things to do, etc.
Classic trade off.

Stinkin' hot, inland place but with substantial undercurrent of wealth and international acclaim, versus, a place with much, much better weather, decent coastal scenery, proximity to both SD and OC, buuuuuut .... obviously more social problems, low skilled / problematic people, etc. That said, I do consider the military presence a net plus, FWIW. And then, you just go next door to Carlsbad and it's a whole different world.
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Old 08-07-2017, 02:19 PM
 
6,721 posts, read 2,994,959 times
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Oceanside or Palm Springs?

Depends on whether you like water or sand, cool weather or the roast.
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Old 08-07-2017, 07:08 PM
 
1,069 posts, read 727,886 times
Reputation: 1490
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
I understand the weather differences. I am more interested in COL, job growth, culture, things to do, etc.
If you can hold off on moving, I'd do that. The Coachella Valley has a huge, pressing issue with the Salton Sea that could potentially cause major health and economic issues for the region. I'd only move to the CV if a pipeline is built to the Salton Sea and shoreline restored and increasing salinity reversed. If the state of CA approves and moves forward with any of the current half-assed measures being proposed, you'll want to move to Oceanside for sure. Otherwise, be prepared for massive helpings of toxic dust in your environment.
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Old 08-11-2017, 02:10 PM
 
5,908 posts, read 1,997,798 times
Reputation: 5548
Quote:
Originally Posted by RosieSD View Post
In terms of things to do, the weather is a big factor. For at least five months out of the year in PS, you're limited to early morning if you want to do outside activities (like golf or hiking) during the day, unless you're OK with trudging around in 107 degree plus weather. Of course, if your idea of fun is drinking in an air conditioned bar all day, this is a moot issue.

I live in SD County (inland, not by the coast) and I love the desert. I spend a lot of time out in the desert from November until April. But, as much as I love the desert, I take a looooooooong break from it when the temps read 100+ for months on end. Sure, it's a dry heat, but 107 still feels mighty hot even if it's a "dry heat."

Other people don't mind the heat. They hunker down during most of the daylight hours, emerging like coyotes when the sun goes down, and getting up early to hit the golf course before 9 am.

I guess my main advice would be to spend several weeks, or better yet, a full month from June to October in Palm Springs and see if you're really a desert rat or not.

If you decide that you ARE a desert rat, and cost of living is a concern, then I'd take a serious look at other desert areas too, rather than just Palm Springs. Phoenix, Las Vegas, Albuquerque, Tuscon are much larger cities than Palm Springs and might be good options for a desert rat who is asking about things to do and cost of living. I also really like St. George Utah -- nice city a little bigger than PS, and close to tons of outdoor activities. Lots of retirees there. If you don't like the Vegas area, check out Mesquite, Nevada -- big retirement community there.

In San Diego County, Borrego Springs is a nice little desert community surrounded by thousands of acres of the beautiful Anza Borrego State Park -- housing prices are significantly cheaper than PS there. Or, check out the Antelope Valley, another desert area in California (there are other options as well).

But, should you decide (after spending time in the summer months in PS) that you're not a desert rat, then maybe look at places like Temecula, where you still have warm weather, but not that HOT, and where you also are closer to the coast for a quick escape when you want one.

The coast, of course, is always nice. Living by the ocean is pretty much everyone's dream. But, the truth is, no where in Southern California "on the coast" is going to be inexpensive (even Oceanside). Go just a bit inland to places like La Mesa or Chula Vista (especially the eastern edges) or Rancho San Diego, Rancho Bernardo, San Marcos, Poway, Alpine. Then, you have lower prices plus moderate weather in comparison to the desert, plus probably more access to a variety of things to do, jobs, and the coast.

If you want coastal living, however, then Southern California coastal living will come with a price tag. There are also less expensive areas for coastal living than Southern California -- Oregon, Florida, Texas (Gulf Coast), South Carolina, North Carolina, Maryland, Delaware, even parts of Northern California (away from the Bay area) etc.

Tip: if you want coastal in California but don't have the budget for it, in addition to Oceanside check out Imperial Beach in SD County, Ventura and Oxnard in Ventura County, the Central Coast of California, and the more far reaching Northern California communities (Eureka, Arcata, etc.)

Again, I don't know where you're moving from, and why you've zeroed in on Oceanside and Palm Springs, but the best way to decide if a place is the right idea for retirement is put boots on the ground for a SIGNIFICANT amount of time when the weather is at its worst.

By the way, you may also want to check out the City Data Retirement forum -- you may find some people who have additional insights and information about choosing a retirement location there. Pick their brains about what they considered when they decided on a retirement location. There are some GREAT folks in that sub-forum.

Good luck with your decision!
What are your thoughts on Alpine, and Ramona, specifically? To me, those inland communities hold a certain appeal because I like the idea of being near the city and the coast if I want to drive in but they have the benefit of not being overpriced and overcrowded.

If I wasn't sworn off CA real estate, I'd consider a nice spread out near Temecula or Murrietta actually - because there are some really great mini-estate properties down that way, and that whole "wine country" vibe is pretty cool.
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Old 08-11-2017, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA, USA 92509
1,377 posts, read 1,037,030 times
Reputation: 678
Quote:
Originally Posted by RosieSD View Post
Also, there are other factors you might want to compare, such as crime. A good way to do that is to go to the site Crimemapping.com which will show you reported crime in any area. First, enter the address where you currently live so you'll have a baseline for comparison. Set the date to the last six months (otherwise, you only get a week). Then, do a search for both Oceanside and PS. I mention this because there is some gang activity in Oceanside and some areas are less safe than others; I don't know enough about crime in Palm Springs, but I'm sure it's similar there. So, do include this into your research if you will be looking for housing in less expensive parts of both towns.
Crime is similar in PS? Hahaha! You've got to be kidding me! Besides, if I have to guess, the crime in PS consists mostly of petty crime/theft, vandalism, property crime and drug/meth-related crimes.
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