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Old 10-10-2017, 09:12 AM
 
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I'm sad to report that my husband's aunt and uncle lost their home of 45+ years in Santa Rosa. They're in their 80s and in poor health. We are so worried about them. A cousin who also lives in Santa Rosa is unsure at this time about her home, but it is not looking good for her based on the most recent reports.
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Old 10-10-2017, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
31,608 posts, read 19,939,787 times
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Originally Posted by RosieSD View Post
I'm sad to report that my husband's aunt and uncle lost their home of 45+ years in Santa Rosa. They're in their 80s and in poor health. We are so worried about them. A cousin who also lives in Santa Rosa is unsure at this time about her home, but it is not looking good for her based on the most recent reports.
I'm so sorry. I can't imagine going through something like that in my 80s.
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Old 10-10-2017, 09:15 AM
 
7,330 posts, read 4,438,206 times
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Originally Posted by 509 View Post
My house isn't the best for fire resistance, but it will be the sage on my neighbors property to will burn down my house, not my trees. The adjacent property is vacant so they has no incentive to remove the sage.
We have 40 acres of open land behind our property. We know the owners of that land and for many years, we have had permission from the owners to clear a sizable swath of land behind our property for fire safety. If you know the owners of the vacant land next to your home, you might approach them about doing the same. It never hurts to ask.
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Old 10-10-2017, 09:21 AM
 
15,733 posts, read 9,244,311 times
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Originally Posted by movinon View Post
And they spread fast, faster than you'd think. Ideally everyone should have a Go-Box or Go-Bag with essentials in it. I have a box in which I keep dog food and bowls, for example. I know that for the Nevada County and Yuba County fires today, they've been requesting dog food bowls, water bowls and dog food at the animal evac center. And my fireproof box with cash and with important papers is handy. It's small enough to carry and a great place to keep photos or CD's. Try to grab a laptop if your phone isn't up to the job - and chargers for both. And obviously meds for everyone. I keep extra water bottles in the garage so I can just grab some of the half gallon jugs on the way out.
A go-bag is essential in CA, as is a plan. I don't live there any more, but when I did, I had a strong box filled with important papers, and an evacuation box in the garage that held enough supplies for 48 hours.

I also had a multi-step evacuation plan.

1. No time to get out - grab the animals, strong box and evacuation box (which has all of my animal's info).

2. 15 minutes to get out - also grab the photo boxes (kept handy in a closet), laptop and sentimental items (all kept together in one place for easy access).

3. 30 minutes to get out - also grab the desktop computer, expensive items, and anything that will fit in the vehicle in 30 minutes.

Had to evacuate once, when a fire came up on the hilltop near our house. We only had one way in, and the fire was at the entrance to our street. We got word from a friend about the fire, then rushed home from work. Got in right before the fire blocked the entrance (although we were prepared to four-wheel it to get to the animals.)

I took 15 minutes and filled my van with dogs in a few crates (I show dogs, so my van always has crates secured in the back), strong box, evacuation box, photos, sentimental items and a change of close, then I got out. My husband stayed another 15 minutes filling up his truck with anything he could grab, then got out before the fire blocked the exit.

Thankfully, the fire was contained after jumping the road, with minimal damage to the first home. We dropped the dogs off at a friend's grooming shop, in the air conditioning, then sat in the evacuation area with our neighbors for about 5 hours.

I always corrected people that asked if earthquakes scared me while living in CA. I told them earthquakes couldn't come close to scaring me like the threat of fire did.
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Old 10-10-2017, 09:22 AM
 
7,330 posts, read 4,438,206 times
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Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
I'm so sorry. I can't imagine going through something like that in my 80s.
Thank you. We are very worried about them. We're keeping our fingers crossed that their daughter's house will turn out to be OK so that they can live with her for a while. But, I just checked her address on the fire map that the County put out, and it is not looking too positive for her at this point.

If anyone is looking for that map, here it is:

ArcGIS Web Application

This map was put together by the County of Sonoma.
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Old 10-10-2017, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,046 posts, read 5,886,300 times
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Originally Posted by KC6ZLV View Post
<>Wood frame construction is the standard throughout the country.<>
Yes, wood is cheap, and I don't know what the alternative would be. This morning I had an image in my mind that we have spent a couple of hundred years cutting down trees, slicing the "bodies" up into small pieces, and stacking and drying the remains in neat rows and clusters with no water available other than piped in drinking water. No wonder that it is all burning like a lumberyard doused in gasoline.
I did notice that in Puerto Rico, where I would think not much lumber is available, the houses seem to have concrete block walls still standing after the hurricane, but the roof, presumably timber truss work and imported plywood, is blown away.
I am very sad for all the losses suffered by the people around our country these last weeks. Wondering who is next? Time for a big Cascadia quake?
Everybody needs to get their shots up to date. Also wills, and bug out packs.
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Old 10-10-2017, 09:33 AM
 
7,330 posts, read 4,438,206 times
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Originally Posted by ringwise View Post
A go-bag is essential in CA, as is a plan. I don't live there any more, but when I did, I had a strong box filled with important papers, and an evacuation box in the garage that held enough supplies for 48 hours.

I also had a multi-step evacuation plan.

1. No time to get out - grab the animals, strong box and evacuation box (which has all of my animal's info).

2. 15 minutes to get out - also grab the photo boxes (kept handy in a closet), laptop and sentimental items (all kept together in one place for easy access).

3. 30 minutes to get out - also grab the desktop computer, expensive items, and anything that will fit in the vehicle in 30 minutes.



I always corrected people that asked if earthquakes scared me while living in CA. I told them earthquakes couldn't come close to scaring me like the threat of fire did.
Me too. The threat of a serious earthquake is much smaller than the threat of wildfires in California, even in suburban areas as we're seeing again in Santa Rosa.

We've been evacuated at least six or seven times in the 30 years that we've lived in our home. We also have a Go Bag, which we keep in an easy to grab place close to our front door.

I'd add to your list that one should have a plan for meeting up with relatives should you not be able to evacuate together. In Santa Rosa, cell phone coverage was spotty yesterday, so many people were having trouble connecting with their relatives. We have two designated meet up places in our county for our family, and a plan for when to go to which of the two (based on access). We also have out of state relatives who everyone in our family knows to call if we can't get through to each other here. That worked like a charm yesterday and today when we wanted to know how our relatives in Santa Rosa were faring. I have to give my late father in law credit for that idea.
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Old 10-10-2017, 09:41 AM
 
7,330 posts, read 4,438,206 times
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Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
Yes, wood is cheap, and I don't know what the alternative would be. This morning I had an image in my mind that we have spent a couple of hundred years cutting down trees, slicing the "bodies" up into small pieces, and stacking and drying the remains in neat rows and clusters with no water available other than piped in drinking water. No wonder that it is all burning like a lumberyard doused in gasoline.
I did notice that in Puerto Rico, where I would think not much lumber is available, the houses seem to have concrete block walls still standing after the hurricane, but the roof, presumably timber truss work and imported plywood, is blown away.
I am very sad for all the losses suffered by the people around our country these last weeks. Wondering who is next? Time for a big Cascadia quake?
Everybody needs to get their shots up to date. Also wills, and bug out packs.
Wild fires are VERY different than hurricanes. When a hurricane is headed your way, you have time to board up windows and prepare. When a wildfire is coming, you may only have a few minutes to get out with your life.

In Southern California, most of the homes are stucco, not wood, and have tile roofs, not shingle roofs.

It makes no difference when a wild fire is roaring through.

When we had a large fire in our community a few years ago, even homes built out of concrete block were destroyed. The fire burned so hot that windows smashed out and the fire sucked into the interior of the homes.

What can help is keeping a perimeter clear around your property. That's actually easier to do in more rural areas than it is in a suburban area where houses are built close together. You may plant fire resistant landscaping in your yard, but it the neighbor down the street likes a tree or two in their yard for shade, your fire resistant landscaping probably won't stop cinders flying onto your roof in high winds. And, in truth, there's only so much anyone can clear. In lots of places in the city of San Diego, for instance, there are urban canyons and parks that you really can't entirely clear.
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Old 10-10-2017, 10:10 AM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
12,574 posts, read 15,041,157 times
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Stay safe, please.
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Old 10-10-2017, 10:47 AM
 
Location: San Diego
35,142 posts, read 32,128,390 times
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For a perspective during the last local fire we had some aluminum tree stands melt into a puddle from temps reaching almost 1500 degrees. About the only thing that doesn't get affected is rock.

Valuables, like firearms and keepsakes are all locked up in fire safes. Hopefully they will be still there after a big fire.
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