U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-18-2020, 09:35 AM
 
6,194 posts, read 3,148,484 times
Reputation: 4160

Advertisements

You will have to compromise on either air quality or freezing temperatures OP.

Some have mentioned Tehachapi. It's a great small town. But key word is small and isolated. Doesn't really sounds like what you want. It's also pretty darn cold in the winter months. Especially by California standards.

Bakersfield could work but it has the worst air quality. I would maybe suggest farther north in the valley. Further north you go the better the air quality, until the fires break out anyway.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-18-2020, 09:36 AM
 
6,194 posts, read 3,148,484 times
Reputation: 4160
Quote:
Originally Posted by JB316 View Post
People in Tehachapi either work at the prison in Tehachapi or commute down the hill to Mojave Space Port or Edwards AFB.
Or down to Bakersfield.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2020, 09:55 AM
 
1,334 posts, read 1,484,145 times
Reputation: 4225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesssicat View Post
My sister just moved from a spot in southwestern Sacrament that was pretty shady. Know of any good locations in Sac?
It sounds like your sister might have being living in or close to Meadowview, an historically depressed area of Sacramento (along with Oak Park and the area around the railyards). The rest of Sac is pretty OK, but you aren't going to find a SFR for $300K that isn't a deep fixer.

You might take a look at Citrus Heights and Antelope if you don't need to worry about the local schools. These are older, "working class" suburbs that have been through some rough times but I think are coming back. A Zillow search for SFR properties between $200 - $400K in Antelope and Citrus Heights yields about 30 properties on the market.

The neighborhoods in Citrus Heights vary widely, though, so you need to take a good look around before buying.

Good luck!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2020, 10:25 AM
 
8,743 posts, read 11,897,033 times
Reputation: 10491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Count David View Post
I would too, but the lifestyle in Ridgecrest (along US-395 ) (which I didn't recommend OP for a multitude of reasons, but does fit OP's 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 if one fits the culture) is very similar to places like North Platte or Sterling. In this case, more major cities are too far away to be able to commute.

Yes, these towns have stores, hospitals, and restaurants, but there is still is a relative need to leave town every now and then for bigger shopping/culture/entertainment/etc in non-covid times. In Ridgecrest, the trips are to Bakersfield or the Antelope Valley, or LA/SD if you're particularly adventurous. People in Cheyenne and Laramie go down to Denver or Fort Collins constantly.

It's just a thing for a lot of people, and what towns of this size don't have becomes more apparent the longer you're in one....like when I lived in Ridgecrest we didn't even have a Burger King. Or a Big/Tall store. And for a time there it didn't have a clothing store (Mervyn's closed down and it took a decade for Marshalls to take its place). Concerts don't come, sports are limited, social things/events trend towards church/school (or drinking/drugs ), or the fair coming to town, etc. It is a bit of an adjustment for those of us who grew up in metro environments.

IMO many of the most ready to "leave LA for good crowd" have trouble adjusting to vastly different environments, which is why so many move to Vegas, Phoenix, and Dallas because the lifestyle is so similar. People don't realize what they're used to and comfortable with until they move onto something else.

We think we want what we want, but what most of us want is just more of the same.
I can relate.

When we moved to a mid-sized city in Alabama (population 200K), it had everything a middle aged man needed (hospitals, restaurants, all-U-can-eat buffets). But once awhile we still make weekend trips to big city like Atlanta for shopping & eating, just to get back into the big city environment again.

BTW, they do have Burger King in Ridgecrest now Last time I visited i saw a couple Asian employees there so I made a humorous comment to the cashier who's a white old lady. She smiled and told me they actually have a significant population of Asians living in Ridgecrest. Who would've figured?

Getting back onto the topic. Based on personal experience, I think it would be good for a young couple get out of LA for a few years if nothing else just to get out of this rat race. Go to a less financially high stressed city and build up their nest eggs. Later, if they're so desired, they can move back.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2020, 10:43 AM
 
8,743 posts, read 11,897,033 times
Reputation: 10491
Quote:
Originally Posted by apple92680 View Post
That's your opinion and you're entitled to it, but it doesn't hold true for everyone. An hour from Los Angeles isn't exactly "middle of nowhere".

Middle of nowhere is someplace like North Platte, Nebraska where you've gotta drive 6-8 hours to get to either Denver or Omaha.

Crime has been decreasing over the years here in Palmdale. It occurs, sure, but it's well below the national average and state average. Drug use is something that is universal.

You'd be stunned to know the amount of people there in your Orange County suburbs with addiction problems, so let's quit pretending like affluence is some magic barrier that stops drug abuse.
People who made comments like that spoke out of ignorance and cultural stereotype. They don't know what they're talking about. They don't live here and they don't spend enough time here to know any better.

Same ignorant comments can be said about Riverside, the IE, making general comments about the entire county. Same can be said about DTLA, San Fernando Valley, etc. It's as if the only worthwhile places to live in LA/ OC are the coastal cities, or should I point out, where the white people live? That's the hidden bias in posts like the one you're responding to.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2020, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,807 posts, read 28,423,226 times
Reputation: 14255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer46 View Post
Part of the problem is that so many people grew up in CA when it was less crowded, less expensive, more open, traffic was a minimal issue, parking was easy, and more enjoyable overall. Adjusting to the "rat race" it has become is difficult for them. Those who are younger are used to today and can cope easier as they have no idea of what the past was like. In the 60's, as an example, diverse restaurants and such were a non issue as no one cared that much. That has changed. Now moving to a totally different place can be good or bad depending on what someone now wants. Many stay, many leave. The younger generation has no idea how much better it was overall. Now, you better have a good income or retirement income or CA will not be easy. If you do, you can enjoy what it has to offer.
I absolutely agree with all of this. I grew up in the IE in the 90's, and was out by 2004. I knew upon graduating high school that it wasn't for me long term, as I had a decent basis of travel to know that things were better/different/cheaper/worth exploring by then.

What's funny to me now is that when I'm in the IE for any period of time, it feels slow/like farms compared to LA. I will say this though: IMO Southern CA has improved since I left.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HB2HSV View Post
I can relate.

When we moved to a mid-sized city in Alabama (population 200K), it had everything a middle aged man needed (hospitals, restaurants, all-U-can-eat buffets). But once awhile we still make weekend trips to big city like Atlanta for shopping & eating, just to get back into the big city environment again.

BTW, they do have Burger King in Ridgecrest now Last time I visited i saw a couple Asian employees there so I made a humorous comment to the cashier who's a white old lady. She smiled and told me they actually have a significant population of Asians living in Ridgecrest. Who would've figured?

Getting back onto the topic. Based on personal experience, I think it would be good for a young couple get out of LA for a few years if nothing else just to get out of this rat race. Go to a less financially high stressed city and build up their nest eggs. Later, if they're so desired, they can move back.
That may end up being what we've done. We've made ourselves in Denver (which also feels like empty farmland compared to LA ), and can actually afford to move back to Southern CA if we want to live a lower-grade lifestyle just for the sake of being there. We ponder it every time we go back, but have never made any effort to pull the trigger.

Yes, I'm aware that Burger King is back in Ridgecrest now. It still doesn't have a Wendy's or INO though! I actually worked with a guy from Thailand who owned a very successful Chinese restaurant in Ridgecrest....have no idea what brought him to Ridgecrest (or most anybody else for that matter).
__________________
Moderator for Los Angeles, The Inland Empire, and the Washington state forums.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2020, 01:19 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
98,562 posts, read 97,019,930 times
Reputation: 109878
I'm not sure why Tehachapi came up, except for affordability, because the OP said this:
Quote:
Weather: I don't like much cold, rain or snow. A mostly sunny location would be nice.
and also, that they like art and concerts, don't want to be isolated, need tech jobs. That doesn't describe Tehachapi, which is very much in its own micro-climate, at an elevation that gets snow, blizzards, when nowhere else in the surroundings does. And it really doesn't have much at all happening in the arts, let alone the job market. Commuting up and down that mountain to tech jobs farther away could get old fast, I imagine.

But for the right people, it can be a nice family environment.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2020, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Corona del Mar, CA - Coronado, CA
4,455 posts, read 2,854,464 times
Reputation: 5552
Quote:
Originally Posted by Count David View Post
Yes, I'm aware that Burger King is back in Ridgecrest now. It still doesn't have a Wendy's or INO though!
CO has Culver's, not to mention Kum & Go. What else could you want?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2020, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Paradise CA, that place on fire
1,801 posts, read 1,310,860 times
Reputation: 5146
You could open Google Maps and draw a line across California from East to West and maybe 50 miles north of Sacramento and there are homes in the $ 250-350 K range, but not on the coast. If you stay away from higher elevations the snow and cold are not bad at all. I have no idea about jobs, we are retired. Finding homeowners insurance could be difficult. With the riots and virus we had this year I expect a slow migration like yours, away from the large metro areas and into the smaller towns where life is less hectic and more enjoyable.

One thing to remember is that while housing costs (rent or purchase) are less in the "North State", everything else is the same or higher than in the LA-Orange County metros. If you are moving for the better quality of life, like us, it should be worth the expenses.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2020, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,807 posts, read 28,423,226 times
Reputation: 14255
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimTheEnchanter View Post
CO has Culver's, not to mention Kum & Go. What else could you want?
Love Kum & Go, one is opening up down the street and I'm excited. I have a Culver's within walking distance.

But AM/PM would be nice, as would Miguel's Jr. and Baker's.
__________________
Moderator for Los Angeles, The Inland Empire, and the Washington state forums.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top