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Old 07-28-2008, 02:09 PM
 
182 posts, read 690,588 times
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Is the Santa Ynez Valley a good place to raise children? The areas that I am talking about are Solvang/Santa Ynez/Los Olivos. Is there enough for them to do and not get bored or in trouble?
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Old 07-28-2008, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Baywood Park
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I'm sure with effort you can find enough to keep them busy. It'a nice area. No doubt it's safe enough. Of the three, I like Los Olivos.
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Old 07-29-2008, 07:38 AM
 
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Thanks.
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Old 07-29-2008, 02:52 PM
 
Location: West LA
2,318 posts, read 7,007,038 times
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I adore the Santa Ynez Valley, but I'm not so sure I'd feel the same about it if I were a kid. I could be wrong since I don't live there, only visit, but I don't see there being a lot of things for kids to do there. Those more knowledgeable, please correct me if I'm wrong.
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Old 08-03-2008, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Ca Cap & Central Ca
182 posts, read 859,961 times
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It would depend upon how old they are and what they like to do.
What are the ages of your children and their interest areas???
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Old 07-12-2010, 05:05 PM
 
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The Santa Ynez Valley is a beautiful place but it has lots of problems. First, if not foremost, the Santa Barbara Sheriff's Department has a long history of corruption. Influential people in SB County are afraid of them, and for good reason. The sheriff once threatened a County Supervisor in an open supervisor's meeting. They seem to do whatever they darn well please and always have. Even the very rich aren't immune, although obviously, they fare much better since Santa Barbara is set up like a feudal society. Secondly, the immense recreational opportunities are held in a vise by the US Forest Service, which in Santa Barbara County are among the worst bunch of green pigs in the nation. Nowhere else have I encountered such a crew of total jerks. If you do a lot of camping, you will learn this soon enough, speaking of which, you run into a healthy cadre of scumbags out in the mountains, some of whom work for the Forest Service and/or the Sheriff's Dept as spies, snitches, and troublemakers. Locals soon learn all about this situation while visitors are pampered and remain clueless. The valley has been completely taken over by the wine and cheese set and the pastoral values once so prevalent there are being shunted aside so that the cell phone/yuppie crowd can have someplace to drive to over the weekend. If you want to see fake ****, go to Laguna Beach. How strange to see that crowd out in Los Olivos, which most of them never even heard of until that stupid movie came out a few years ago. Santa Barbara is not "the wine country." It's a beautiful place that has been taken over by the wine industry. Horses and cattle once reigned supreme and all these wine guzzling phonies aren't wanted except by the money-grubbers who are making a pretty penny off their phony "values." LA go home!!!
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Old 07-12-2010, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,235,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rigamarole View Post
The Santa Ynez Valley is a beautiful place but it has lots of problems. First, if not foremost, the Santa Barbara Sheriff's Department has a long history of corruption. Influential people in SB County are afraid of them, and for good reason. The sheriff once threatened a County Supervisor in an open supervisor's meeting. They seem to do whatever they darn well please and always have. Even the very rich aren't immune, although obviously, they fare much better since Santa Barbara is set up like a feudal society. Secondly, the immense recreational opportunities are held in a vise by the US Forest Service, which in Santa Barbara County are among the worst bunch of green pigs in the nation. Nowhere else have I encountered such a crew of total jerks. If you do a lot of camping, you will learn this soon enough, speaking of which, you run into a healthy cadre of scumbags out in the mountains, some of whom work for the Forest Service and/or the Sheriff's Dept as spies, snitches, and troublemakers. Locals soon learn all about this situation while visitors are pampered and remain clueless. The valley has been completely taken over by the wine and cheese set and the pastoral values once so prevalent there are being shunted aside so that the cell phone/yuppie crowd can have someplace to drive to over the weekend. If you want to see fake ****, go to Laguna Beach. How strange to see that crowd out in Los Olivos, which most of them never even heard of until that stupid movie came out a few years ago. Santa Barbara is not "the wine country." It's a beautiful place that has been taken over by the wine industry. Horses and cattle once reigned supreme and all these wine guzzling phonies aren't wanted except by the money-grubbers who are making a pretty penny off their phony "values." LA go home!!!
Wow, that's quite a mouthful. I don't know the politics of Santa Barbara county so will not comment on the county sheriffs department or the state parks personnel. Santa Ynez valley is surrounded by beautiful mountains in the Los Padres national forest so there are places to camp out. The valley is as you write, mainly vineyards and produces some fine California wines in spite of your comment to the contrary. The town of Santa Inez has a nice old mission and Solvang is an interesting community started by Sweds many decades ago.

The Santa Ynez valley is fairly remote so it probably is a little bit on the boring side. But a drive over the San Marcos pass into Santa Barbara shouldn't take more than an hour for beach and restaurants. Also Los Olivos has steak houses noted for great BBQ.
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Old 07-22-2010, 11:22 PM
 
10 posts, read 31,717 times
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"Santa Ynez valley is surrounded by beautiful mountains in the Los Padres national forest." It's called Los Padres National Forest, not THE Los Padres national forest. Check your Spanish book. "The valley is as you write, mainly vineyards." Wrong again. The Santa Ynez Valley has long been dominated by cattle and horse ranches, although the wine industry has grown steadily there over the last several decades. "and produces some fine California wines in spite of your comment to the contrary." Just because some excellent wine is produced there is no reason to cut down all the beautiful white oaks for more and more grapes. And as for the yuppies it attracts, who needs 'em. "The town of Santa Inez has a nice old mission and Solvang is an interesting community started by Sweds many decades ago." Mission Santa Inez is in Solvang, dip, and it was started by Danes, not Swedes. The town of Santa Ynez is a different place. "a drive over the San Marcos pass into Santa Barbara shouldn't take more than an hour for beach and restaurants. Also Los Olivos has steak houses noted for great BBQ." It's San Marcos Pass, not THE San Marcos Pass, and it can be a dangerous drive if your tired, unfamiliar with it, the weather's bad, or if there are trains of yuppies in their small cars on their cell phones driving 20 miles over the limit, in a hurry to get back to the Big City while trying to force local traffic off the road. Los Olivos used to be a quiet little village, that is, before the wine and cheese set got to ruining the place. Valley society is VERY provincial and the area is geographically isolated from the coast. You don't just hop over the mountains in a jif unless you're a moron.
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Old 07-22-2010, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,235,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoaNelly View Post
"Santa Ynez valley is surrounded by beautiful mountains in the Los Padres national forest." It's called Los Padres National Forest, not THE Los Padres national forest. Check your Spanish book. "The valley is as you write, mainly vineyards." Wrong again. The Santa Ynez Valley has long been dominated by cattle and horse ranches, although the wine industry has grown steadily there over the last several decades. "and produces some fine California wines in spite of your comment to the contrary." Just because some excellent wine is produced there is no reason to cut down all the beautiful white oaks for more and more grapes. And as for the yuppies it attracts, who needs 'em. "The town of Santa Inez has a nice old mission and Solvang is an interesting community started by Sweds many decades ago." Mission Santa Inez is in Solvang, dip, and it was started by Danes, not Swedes. The town of Santa Ynez is a different place. "a drive over the San Marcos pass into Santa Barbara shouldn't take more than an hour for beach and restaurants. Also Los Olivos has steak houses noted for great BBQ." It's San Marcos Pass, not THE San Marcos Pass, and it can be a dangerous drive if your tired, unfamiliar with it, the weather's bad, or if there are trains of yuppies in their small cars on their cell phones driving 20 miles over the limit, in a hurry to get back to the Big City while trying to force local traffic off the road. Los Olivos used to be a quiet little village, that is, before the wine and cheese set got to ruining the place. Valley society is VERY provincial and the area is geographically isolated from the coast. You don't just hop over the mountains in a jif unless you're a moron.
I'm not sure what your point is. Putting the proposition "the" in front of the name, Los Padres forest seems like proper English to me. In Spanish it would be "el" bosque Los Padres. Not sure what you're getting at. Sorry I put Mission Santa Inez in Santa Ynez instead of Solvang as you point out [geez the distance must be 10 miles apart ]. What a grouch!
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Old 07-23-2010, 03:45 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
4,883 posts, read 7,319,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gc57 View Post
Is the Santa Ynez Valley a good place to raise children? The areas that I am talking about are Solvang/Santa Ynez/Los Olivos. Is there enough for them to do and not get bored or in trouble?
It's very much in the country with not much in the way of employment unless you're involved in agriculture or the wine business. Lompoc is pretty ghetto so I'd avoid that (people jokingly call it "Lompton" like Compton) but the rest of the area is nice. It's a good 45 minutes from the valley to Santa Barbara though so hopefully you're not planning on commuting into the city for work.
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