U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-13-2009, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Lovely Lansing
188 posts, read 554,463 times
Reputation: 52

Advertisements

Title says it all. Wife and I are starting to get closer to an out of state move after a lot of kicking it around and thinking about it. Just trying to get an idea as to where in CA it is fairly safe bet against having massive fires and earth quakes. Looking towards the north where it's more affordable.

Thanks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-13-2009, 12:36 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,445,221 times
Reputation: 8936
Central Valley probably.

The northern area has plenty of quakes and sometimes large fires farther inland.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2009, 12:53 PM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,584 posts, read 33,801,600 times
Reputation: 16833
Just don't live in or near the urban/wildland interface and you won't have to worry about the fires.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2009, 01:32 PM
 
Location: San Josť, CA
3,271 posts, read 5,792,025 times
Reputation: 3207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fontucky View Post
Just don't live in or near the urban/wildland interface and you won't have to worry about the fires.
OP, Fontucky makes a great point.

Generally, the fires occur out of ignorance, carelessness and laziness. Around July 4th, you'll find fires occuring on hillsides from children or adults who behave like children. Aside from that, fires occur typically in the brownish/golden long grasses and if you own property near where urban meets wildland, simply keep a 100-foot buffer between it and your house so that in case it does catch fire, you're safe from it. It becomes a problem when people don't take care to keep a buffer zone between it and their homes.

Ironically, many times the long, hay-like grass catches fire because people are mowing it and a spark is struck against a metal object, etc. I'm sure there is a wealth of information about how to mow properly, so just follow the general rules and you're good.

The likelihood that you'll live on the edge of urban and rural like that isn't very good. Most neighborhoods are within urban development and you won't ever have to worry about it. You're most likely to see a fire on a hillside while driving on a highway or road.

As for earthquakes, simply google where the fault lines are and research how those towns have handled past earthquakes. It should give you a good idea how they might handle a similarly sized earthquake in the future. It's also important to keep in mind, however, that as we progress in building and infrastructure, damage will continue to be lessened and lessened.

Honestly, I wouldn't worry about either of those two things as much as I'd worry about things like making sure you're in the right area and sheltered from crime, thugs, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2009, 01:49 PM
 
Location: RSM
5,113 posts, read 17,472,229 times
Reputation: 1892
While this isn't a rule, anywhere you're close to mountains or hills in CA(perhaps the West), you're probably on or near a fault.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2009, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Lovely Lansing
188 posts, read 554,463 times
Reputation: 52
Thanks for the input. These two things are the Mrs.'s main concerns. But just like here in Michigan, every area is going to have it's faults.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2009, 01:56 PM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,584 posts, read 33,801,600 times
Reputation: 16833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puddy4LyF View Post
Aside from that, fires occur typically in the brownish/golden long grasses and if you own property near where urban meets wildland, simply keep a 100-foot buffer between it and your house so that in case it does catch fire, you're safe from it. It becomes a problem when people don't take care to keep a buffer zone between it and their homes.
The buffer zone safety concept goes out the window when the fuel is chaparral and the fire's being driven by Santa Ana/Diablo Winds. In that situation, 8 lanes of concrete freeway buffer zone isn't enough. The winds will simply piledrive burning embers under your roofing material and through your attic vents.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2009, 02:01 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,163,751 times
Reputation: 10910
Don't live in the middle of chaparral. That's how to avoid fire. That means, more urban settings, generally, away from the hills.

As for quakes, you need to accept the inevitable. It's a fool's errand to try and find "less quake prone" areas. There are new faults being discovered every year. Everything west of the Rockies is much more seismically active than East of it (the Eastern exceptions being the well known northern Appalachian, New Madrid and Carolinas zones).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2009, 02:13 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,514,657 times
Reputation: 29081
Default What area has the fewest quakes and fires?

Well, if you'd asked about flakes and flamers I'd have steered you clear of San Francisco, West Holloywood and a few other places.

But quakes and fires? Good luck. Nowhere's safe that you'd want to live, even if you could find one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2009, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Lovely Lansing
188 posts, read 554,463 times
Reputation: 52
Thanks for the input. These two things are the Mrs.'s main concerns. But just like here in Michigan, every area is going to have it's faults.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:16 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top