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Old 03-24-2011, 08:04 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
4,883 posts, read 7,422,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PalmBch View Post
What kind of Palm trees does S. Cali have then? Are they all only the tall one's?
The only native palm tree in Southern California is the Washington Palm (Washington Filifera) but a great many other palm trees do grow here even if they are not native here.
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Old 03-25-2011, 01:40 AM
 
Location: Coachella Valley, California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelito23 View Post
I can pretty much guarantee that out in the dessert, either Coachella or Imperial Valley, near the Salton Sea, there are no coconut palms. It gets way too cold here in the winter, nights in the upper 20s are not uncommon on an annual basis, especially in unprotected areas. Ontop of that, there are many days in the 50s. Then the summer time temps are way to high on a consistent basis and add to the mix no rain....it just isn't possible. You have to go way down to the Gulf of Califorinia in Baja and the southern border of Sonora along the Sea of Cortez to see the farthest NW coconuts growing without ridiculous care.

There are some Royal Poincianas growing in the dessert vallys though...but they don't look as nice as tey should due to all the previous reasons.
Mmmmm .... dessert. Coconut dessert, to be exact! Yummy!!!
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Old 03-25-2011, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Muncie, IN
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Newport Beach CA trunking coconut.


Try a Parajubaea if you want something like a coconut in California... If you live close to the coast.
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Old 07-18-2011, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Lovely swampy humid Miami!
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Forget Parajubea! Those look nothing like a Coconut. The most similar palm in terms of leaf type, size and coloring is the Jubaeopsis Caffra from South Africa. They are the most similar in type, and fairly hardy. The Jubaeopsis Caffra, however, has multiple trunks which sprout from suckers, and it does not lose its leaf bases which gives the trunks a rougher appearance, but the overall effect can be like a clump of Coconut Palms. They do get a very rich color of green with orange/yellow petioles and leaflets which have a yellow spine much like a Maypan Coconut.
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Old 07-19-2011, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by humboldtrat View Post
There are no coconut palms in California. In the desert, there are palm trees that produce dates. I have been to this place east of Palm Springs and where dates are harvested from rows and rows of date palm trees Oasis Date Gardens Organic Certified Medjool Dates
Boy do I remember the date trees, the date festival and all the rest when my mother and father in law lived in the Palm Springs area. We would get date shakes, make date cookies and date pudding and bread. Today, dates are so expensive we can't afford to look at them, much less buy them (well that might be an exageration a little)

OP: I have never seen a coco-nut palm in CA.
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Old 07-20-2011, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Muncie, IN
588 posts, read 1,116,582 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reptoid Humidian View Post
Forget Parajubea! Those look nothing like a Coconut. The most similar palm in terms of leaf type, size and coloring is the Jubaeopsis Caffra from South Africa. They are the most similar in type, and fairly hardy. The Jubaeopsis Caffra, however, has multiple trunks which sprout from suckers, and it does not lose its leaf bases which gives the trunks a rougher appearance, but the overall effect can be like a clump of Coconut Palms. They do get a very rich color of green with orange/yellow petioles and leaflets which have a yellow spine much like a Maypan Coconut.
Here is a young Parajubaea...



Another palm that might substitute as a Coconut is a Beccariophoenix alfredii which looks like...

http://i.ebayimg.com/03/%21B2PhYGg%21mk%7E$%28KGrHqN,%21h8E%29qrTdhrBBMhrC S%28B,Q%7E%7E_35.JPG (broken link)

I'd say the Parajubaea or the Beccariophoenixwould look similar to a Coconut. The Parajubaea grows very nicely along the coast of California, but these rarer palms are grown by enthusiasts and require a bit of work to keep up.

OP, I would suggest perhaps a Parajubaea (expensive) or go with a typical Queen or King palm. The problem of coconuts in California is the consistent wet cool winters which are detrimental to Coconuts. It's not necessarily that we get too cold, but the combination of cold wet soil in the winter is just not good. Those that try coconuts in California plant them in a very sandy mixture so cool water in the winter from rains goes straight through the soil. They usually plant them against a wall or something like that to retain heat. Heating coils in the ground and Christmas tree lights may be necessary during cold snaps in the winter.

The one in Newport Beach that I posted earlier is somewhat of a fluke. It is probably planted in a rather sandy soil being that close to the water and has some sort of heat source like a darker colored wall or something like that. It seems to be thriving. Coconut palms thrive in humid warm conditions such as Hawaii or southern Florida. There are a few in extreme southern Texas, but the California climate isn't ideal for Coconuts.
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Old 07-20-2011, 05:46 PM
 
15,592 posts, read 32,035,854 times
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It's hard to grow coconuts even in Florida. I had 6 beautiful coconut palms in my yard in Sarasota (SW FL) but the past couple winters were cold and they all died but one. They like warm, humid rainy climates, and don't even like temps in the 40s. I can't see how any could thrive in California's climate.
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Old 07-20-2011, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Oroville, California
3,327 posts, read 4,925,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BayAreaHillbilly View Post
Furthest northern commercial citrus (Mandarins) are in Nevada County.
Shasta County.

http://www.redding.com/news/2010/dec...arins/?print=1
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Old 05-22-2012, 03:46 AM
 
31 posts, read 27,916 times
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Why are some of you trying to discourage people from trying to grow one of the most beautiful palm tree in the world?

People who want a coconut shouldnt be told to use a substitute inferior palm tree.

Keep on trying i beleive in the right location like newport the coconut will thrive and survive. dont let these negative nay sayers convince you otherwise.
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Old 05-22-2012, 03:49 AM
 
31 posts, read 27,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsychic View Post
It's hard to grow coconuts even in Florida. I had 6 beautiful coconut palms in my yard in Sarasota (SW FL) but the past couple winters were cold and they all died but one. They like warm, humid rainy climates, and don't even like temps in the 40s. I can't see how any could thrive in California's climate.

well the fact there is one thriving in newport proves your theory wrong. you just seen the picture why are trying to contradict a fact? is there one growing outside in newport or not?
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