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Old 05-16-2007, 11:58 AM
 
11 posts, read 52,094 times
Reputation: 16

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I am thinking of moving to Mt. Shasta area. I have no idea of cost of heating a home in a cold climate. Can anyone help? I am retired so I have to have as much cost of living data as possible before a move.
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Old 05-16-2007, 12:28 PM
 
Location: The mountians of Northern California.
1,354 posts, read 5,957,788 times
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SInce propane and electric costs are all very different all over the state, here is my suggestion.

Find out who the utilities are in Mt. Shasta. Call them and ask what the average is (they know this, they have some sliding scale billing, so its easy). You need to have an idea of what size home you are looking at.

I live in a rural community within 2 hours of Mt. Shasta. We get about the same amount of snow. My home us 1,500 sq feet. In the winter we use a woodstove and baseboard heating. My average electric bill in the winter is $240. If I used baseboard heating all day, it would be triple that. But I only use baseboard heating in the mornings. The rest of the day I use a woodstove. The wood is $180 per cord for lodgepole, we use 2 cords per winter.

My freinds with propane pay about $300 to fill up the tank. You are put on a route and they fill it monthly. Sometimes the bill is $300, sometimes less, depending on how much they have to fill it up. Some people I know keep their homes at 80-85 degrees using their propane in the winter, they pay close to $300 a month. Others that keep it a little cooler, and dont pay as much. Remember, as gas goes up, so does propane. So it *can* be very expensive, depending on the gas prices.

Because each area of Calif is on a different utility, locally owned propane dealers, etc, the prices are a bit different.
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Old 05-16-2007, 12:30 PM
 
Location: The mountians of Northern California.
1,354 posts, read 5,957,788 times
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I forgot to add that if you buy the portable electric heaters, you will still pay almost as much as baseboard heating. Baseboard heating is pretty common in the rural areas who need 2 forms of heating in a home, I don't like it personally. There are also oil heaters in alot of homes in the far northern areas of Calif. You can buy the heating oil at places like WM or get on a route to have it delivered.
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Old 05-16-2007, 04:49 PM
 
Location: California
11,451 posts, read 17,904,337 times
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I'm not an expert but I can tell you electricity only for heat will cost you a lot more than propane. I would go with a wood stove and propane. I have a wood stove and haven't used my heater in two years, of course It doesn't snow here.
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Old 05-16-2007, 08:56 PM
 
11 posts, read 52,094 times
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Red face Thanks so much

What about a monitor stove. I see them listed as a source of heat in real estate ads. Are they reasonably efficient? I really want to get out of smog and heat of southern cal.
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Old 05-16-2007, 11:18 PM
 
Location: The mountians of Northern California.
1,354 posts, read 5,957,788 times
Reputation: 1326
The monitor stove is an oil heated unit. I have some friends with small homes that just love them. But they aren't as practical for a large home. Oil prices tend to follow the gas and propane prices. When car gasoline goes up, so do home heating oils and propane.

Just a word of caution on pellet stoves. They are great, don't get me wrong. But when there is a shortage of pellets for sale, like this winter, I knew some people who were not very happy. I have no idea what happened, but our area had a huge pellet shortage. I have learned living in a rural area that stocking up on things is a very good idea.
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