U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-25-2009, 12:39 AM
 
13,345 posts, read 10,613,696 times
Reputation: 9254
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewToCA View Post
You can even find a decent number of hard right wingers in San Francisco and Berkeley.
Say what? I wouldn't call myself a hard right winger, but I feel alone being a conservative in the South Bay. Republican is a dirty word in most of the Bay Area, especially Berkeley and San Francisco.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-25-2009, 12:52 AM
 
13,345 posts, read 10,613,696 times
Reputation: 9254
Quote:
Originally Posted by AliveandWell View Post
I also think the pollution is pretty bad..
Air pollution has been on the decline for 3 decades now (as it has been in most parts of the US). With stricter emissions standards on cars, power plants, and at the ports, pollution is set to decline even more. Although I concede it is still bad in the Inland Empire, & parts of the Central Valley.

www.aqmd.gov


Quote:
Originally Posted by AliveandWell View Post
I could rent a 3 bedroom apartment in Tempe AZ for $900. In L.A. a place like that is probably over $2200 a month which is almost 3x the price. In other words, that is outrageous. I'm not complaining I'm just saying it how it is. Why on earth do landlords charge $1100 a month for a one bedroom apartment?.
I'll tell you why. It's supply/demand. People want to live here, but once they get here, they don't want anyone else to move here. There are all kinds of red tape and bureaucratice roadblocks to increasing the housing supply. Low supply and high demand means very high rents and home prices.

One thing people don't like about transplanted Californians is they move because of the high cost of living in CA and then they promote the same kinds of public policies that forced them out of their home state in the first place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2009, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Hills & Hollers of SW MO
18,305 posts, read 14,455,517 times
Reputation: 15916
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
One thing people don't like about transplanted Californians is they move because of the high cost of living in CA and then they promote the same kinds of public policies that forced them out of their home state in the first place.
Not so fast! We're transplanted Califoreigners and have advocated nothing thus far. We like the comparitively retro way things are here just fine else we'd not have moved.

Merry Christmas! We're having a white one. Who could ask for more!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2009, 11:10 PM
 
Location: West Coast Wanderer
11,844 posts, read 9,435,787 times
Reputation: 5508
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Say what? I wouldn't call myself a hard right winger, but I feel alone being a conservative in the South Bay. Republican is a dirty word in most of the Bay Area, especially Berkeley and San Francisco.
...and that's a problem because...? LOL
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2009, 11:22 PM
 
6 posts, read 8,115 times
Reputation: 16
I lived in So. Cal in the 70s when it was perfect.
Then the 80s construction boom and the developers built on every sqaure inch of land.
I left in the 90s thinking they couldn't possibly build any more.
Then I returned for a visit in 2003. WOW! It happened, they took Temecula, Rancho California and made a huge fricking endless city to the east. I didn't think it was possible.

The only thing CA has going for it is the weather. Other than that, learn to speak Spanish because you'll need it, be prepared to live in a cookie cutter house, be ready to go to a lock down school, and sit at a stop light for more time than you wish to waste.

I'd return if it was before 1975. Now... it's destroyed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2009, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Monterey County, CA
3,606 posts, read 6,438,019 times
Reputation: 3087
Quote:
Originally Posted by elllen View Post
I lived in So. Cal in the 70s when it was perfect.
Then the 80s construction boom and the developers built on every sqaure inch of land.
I left in the 90s thinking they couldn't possibly build any more.
Then I returned for a visit in 2003. WOW! It happened, they took Temecula, Rancho California and made a huge fricking endless city to the east. I didn't think it was possible.

The only thing CA has going for it is the weather. Other than that, learn to speak Spanish because you'll need it, be prepared to live in a cookie cutter house, be ready to go to a lock down school, and sit at a stop light for more time than you wish to waste.

I'd return if it was before 1975. Now... it's destroyed.
I think what you are describing has effected specific parts of the state in this way - primarily SoCal from LA-SD. But where we live now in Monterey for example this really isn't a factor. And actually after moving back to CA from CO I find we have less traffic, cookie cutter homes, etc... where we are living now than we did there while living there.

But even within LA County there is are places where there has simply been no where else to build for quite some time like the beach communities for example where I grew up. The South Bay has always been popular so once the developers built it out back in the 80s there was no where left to build. Hence that area isn't that different today.

Has Temecula grown? Sure and many other urban sprawl centers as well. But that isn't unique to CA. That has happened across the country around the larger economic centers - more traffic, higher prices, etc... compared to what the locals fondly remember from their childhood. We noticed native Coloradans talking about the same things happening to their major cities. They talk about the good ole days when you could buy land for pennies on the dollar and all you saw were open fields for hundreds of miles. And traffic, what traffic? And the same experience is true for the PNW as well as many other parts of the country.

My favorite part now is when I am drving to work and listening to the news. The newscaster comes on and says "Now its time to take a look at our traffic ... and at this time there nothing to report." ;p

Derek

Last edited by MtnSurfer; 12-26-2009 at 12:19 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2009, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Outside of Los Angeles
1,223 posts, read 1,416,410 times
Reputation: 723
One of the things that really bugs me about CA is the overall expense involved in living here. Eating out costs $$$ here as well as going to a concert. Concerts here are usually expensive. I already talked about how high the rent costs are. that adds to the difficulty of living here. And in my opinion, we have some of the worst drivers in the country. They love to cut you off and some of them don't even use signal lights. Isn't that typical? The nerve of some people!! And I don't think that people in CA overall are very friendly. I am not saying that the people here are the meanest. They just don't seem to give you the impression that they are approachable. SF is better in this aspect though. Having said that, in spite of the negatives there are pluses to living in CA. I just had to point this stuff out to people who may think CA is the best place in the USA. Not even close, but its also not the worst.

Last edited by AliveandWell; 12-26-2009 at 01:42 PM.. Reason: add text
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2009, 07:29 PM
 
36 posts, read 93,029 times
Reputation: 49
Jesse Colin Young lived on a ridgetop in California, and Lord knows he liked it just fine. It was windy and foggy and quiet most all the time. His lawn was pine needles and his driveway was old funky dirt. His front pathway markers were pieces of granite and chert.

His taxes were high, but he didn't believe it was a sin. He had hundred foot pine trees that just loved to dance in the wind. And a yard full of bushes that turned into pie in July. Between blue jays and hoot owls he had twenty-four hour singing sky.

When Jesse built his house he cut six trees to clear out the land, but there were thirty or more left and you know they were gonna stand. It was a squirrel sanctuary. They thought that woods was their home. And as long as he was there he made sure people left them alone.

The hill that he lived on was steep, and the road full of ruts. And the people who lived in the flatlands thought those hill folks were nuts. But the ruts in his road and the curves kept the tourists at bay. It was lonesome and peaceful, and you know he liked it that way.

Jesse worked in the city. He thought his job was a gas. He knew it was good for him to travel and get off his ass. But the very best parts of each trip was the Golden Gate Bridge, and the road like a snake that would lead him back home to his ridge.

- adapted from the song by Jesse Colin Young, Ridgetop

** Note: When Jesse's recording studio and house were destroyed in the Ridgetop Fire in 1995, he moved from Marin to Hawaii.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2009, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,365 posts, read 51,689,764 times
Reputation: 16194
Quote:
Originally Posted by AliveandWell View Post
One of the things that really bugs me about CA is the overall expense involved in living here. Eating out costs $$$ here as well as going to a concert. Concerts here are usually expensive. I already talked about how high the rent costs are. that adds to the difficulty of living here. And in my opinion, we have some of the worst drivers in the country. They love to cut you off and some of them don't even use signal lights. Isn't that typical? The nerve of some people!! And I don't think that people in CA overall are very friendly. I am not saying that the people here are the meanest. They just don't seem to give you the impression that they are approachable. SF is better in this aspect though. Having said that, in spite of the negatives there are pluses to living in CA. I just had to point this stuff out to people who may think CA is the best place in the USA. Not even close, but its also not the worst.

Additional cost for restaurants and concerts in CA is in the noise compared to the additional costs of housing.

Go to any city's City Data Forum and you will find a thread exclaiming its drivers are the worst. In reality, all drivers are about the same - the standard deviation for jerky drivers across the US is pretty low.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2009, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Central Coast
2,014 posts, read 3,234,371 times
Reputation: 734
caca
Quote:
Originally Posted by elllen
I lived in So. Cal in the 70s when it was perfect.

No, it had 10,000,000 people


Then the 80s construction boom and the developers built on every sqaure inch of land.
I left in the 90s thinking they couldn't possibly build any more.
Then I returned for a visit in 2003. WOW! It happened, they took Temecula, Rancho California and made a huge fricking endless city to the east. I didn't think it was possible.

It was the change that you did not like, So Cal has been uninhabitable for many many decades

The only thing CA has going for it is the weather. Other than that, learn to speak Spanish because you'll need it, be prepared to live in a cookie cutter house, be ready to go to a lock down school, and sit at a stop light for more time than you wish to waste.

No you don't the Mexicans are much better at learning English than the Anglos are at learning Spanish, Most of America has the same new cookie cutter homes with the same floor plans, travel a bit, check it out. If you live like this, you chose it, no one is holding you prisoner, get out, get a life, quite complaining.

I'd return if it was before 1975. Now... it's destroyed.

So, in the young ladies new home, it is 20 degrees and snowing, the ground is flat, and in the summer the humidity matches the air temp, and the area is growing at about 2% per year, with a Hispanic growth rate of about 6% per year!!
What she left, is following her, growth and Mexicans, it is a sad fate indeed, well there is always Yellowknife Canada.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top