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Old 05-27-2010, 10:09 PM
 
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I've been receiving mixed answers as to whether subtropical fruits can grow along the northern California coast.

Of specific interest to me are fruits such as Black Sapote, Sapodilla, Canistel, Cherimoya, etc. Isnt there a way to grow these toward the coast, between the bay and Oregon?
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Old 05-27-2010, 11:20 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1337357pwn3r View Post
I've been receiving mixed answers as to whether subtropical fruits can grow along the northern California coast.

Of specific interest to me are fruits such as Black Sapote, Sapodilla, Canistel, Cherimoya, etc. Isnt there a way to grow these toward the coast, between the bay and Oregon?
I don't think the fruits that you list would do well in Arcata or anywhere along the immediate northern California coast. Maybe you can consult Sunset books on plants adaptable to California. The climate of Arcata is likely way too cool and wet for at least sapote and cherimoya. These plants grow ok in Southern California. My neighbor has 2 huge sapote trees and we have a cherimoya in a pot. Sapote are delicious but the seed is nearly 70% of the fruit.
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Old 05-28-2010, 09:52 AM
 
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Well, I know sapote is not limited to SoCal (my parents grow it in the Bay Area), but their area tends to be hot and sunny, not cool and wet like Arcata. I do notice, however, that they do better in cooler years and have read that they like growing conditions for lemons, so my hunch is they would do fine in Arcata.

Subtropical fruits have two issues. None of them like frost. Arcata probably gets almost no frost, so that's okay. Some varieties of fruit like heat, though, and Arcata doesn't have it. I think sapote, avocados, lemons, and *possibly* cherimoya might fit the bill. I wouldn't hold my breath on cherimoyas though.

BTW, regarding the sapote having 70% seed, my parents' white sapote only has a smallish pit in the middle. I have a feeling the fruit varies by plant and cultivar.
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Old 05-28-2010, 10:34 AM
 
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I've seen photos of Black Sapote that almost looked seedless, so I have no Idea what that was about. Thank you both for the advice, though!

tstieber, what are some other uncommon fruit that would probably handle similar growing conditions as the Sapote, and thrive well enough in Arcata? I do know that the Wildberries and Co-op in Arcata both carry locally grown Cherimoyas, because I called to ask if they usually carry any obscure varieties of fruits but both, as well as the Eureka co-op, all said that they often carry Cherimoyas but that's the only one they mentioned besides the usual mangos, papayas, etc. Fruitarians and fruitarianism are awesome but it's unfortunate that people are almost forced to move to either southern California which is expensive, hot, dry, has no trees for shade, and lots of rattlesnakes - or be forced to move to Hawaii which is the place I'm considering 50/50 alongside Arcata.
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Old 05-28-2010, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Pasadena
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1337357pwn3r View Post
I've seen photos of Black Sapote that almost looked seedless, so I have no Idea what that was about. Thank you both for the advice, though!

tstieber, what are some other uncommon fruit that would probably handle similar growing conditions as the Sapote, and thrive well enough in Arcata? I do know that the Wildberries and Co-op in Arcata both carry locally grown Cherimoyas, because I called to ask if they usually carry any obscure varieties of fruits but both, as well as the Eureka co-op, all said that they often carry Cherimoyas but that's the only one they mentioned besides the usual mangos, papayas, etc. Fruitarians and fruitarianism are awesome but it's unfortunate that people are almost forced to move to either southern California which is expensive, hot, dry, has no trees for shade, and lots of rattlesnakes - or be forced to move to Hawaii which is the place I'm considering 50/50 alongside Arcata.
It depends what areas of southern California you are referring to since not all regions are hot [coastal areas are quite mild], dry [LA averages more rainfall than many areas in central California for example], there are plenty of trees except in the desert or interior regions near the deserts and rattlesnakes are limited to the open land foothills near metro regions.

I don't think sapote is grown commercially in California but I could be wrong. I wasn't aware that there are species with smaller seeds\ pits. I am surprised that cherimoyas grow in Humboldt county and can not imagine how mangoes and papayas would flourish up in the North Coast area. I've seen papayas in southern California [can't miss them since their fruits grows from the actual tree trunk] and mangoes are common but the climate here is probably 10-20 degrees warmer than Arcata. Good luck.
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Old 05-28-2010, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Baywood Park
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1337357pwn3r View Post
Fruitarians and fruitarianism are awesome but it's unfortunate that people are almost forced to move to either southern California which is expensive, hot, dry, has no trees for shade, and lots of rattlesnakes - or be forced to move to Hawaii which is the place I'm considering 50/50 alongside Arcata.
That doesn't define where I live....except maybe the expensive part. But it's not all out of reach, especially in these times.

I'm going to suggest you take a serious look at a place like Nipomo.
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Old 05-28-2010, 08:57 PM
 
Location: State of Jefferson coast
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Despite what the Western Garden Book maps might have you believe regarding "Sunset Zone 17", the mild Mediterranean zone with relatively short winters ends rather abruptly around Stinson Beach. North of Marin County, the coast is mild, but chilly. Winters are long and wet and total number of annual heat units are about half to two-thirds of what they are around SF. About the only fruit that are arguably subtropical that can be grown in Humboldt Co. are kiwis, feijoas and 'Meyer' lemon. There just aren't enough heat units to ripen the rest. However mild winters may be here, they are L-O-O-O-O-N-G. In fact, there never comes a season when you can put away your winter jacket. There are many fog-blown days in July and August with high temps in the low 50's (occasionally even the upper 40's...YES!...48 or 49F for a daily high in mid-summer!) Even many temperate fruit -- cherries, peaches, apples, etc., struggle to produce good-tasting fruit in this heat-deprived area.

"Sapote" is a rather generic term in Spanish that refers to a number of apple-shaped fruits that really aren't related to each other: Diospyros dignya, Pouteria sapota, Casimiroa edulis in particular. Of these, Casimiroa tolerates the coolest temperatures and can be grown as far north as the SF Bay. The other sapotes won't do well much north of Pt. Conception. Remember that producing good-tasting fruit involves more than just the survival of the tree. Sweeter flavinoids are heat dependent and cool temperatures make for acidic fruit.
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Old 05-28-2010, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Baywood Park
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After reading the above post, the reference to Pt. Conception, and assuming the OP is looking for cheap real estate. I'll suggest Oxnard.
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Old 05-29-2010, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Eureka CA
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A lot of the "locally grown" produce hereabouts is actually from Willow Creek, Witchipec or other areas which are an hour or more inland from the coast and therefore a lot warmer. I live 8 miles from Arcata and we definitely get frost many mornings.
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Old 05-31-2010, 08:43 AM
 
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Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
It depends what areas of southern California you are referring to since not all regions are hot [coastal areas are quite mild], dry [LA averages more rainfall than many areas in central California for example], there are plenty of trees except in the desert or interior regions near the deserts and rattlesnakes are limited to the open land foothills near metro regions.

I don't think sapote is grown commercially in California but I could be wrong. I wasn't aware that there are species with smaller seeds\ pits. I am surprised that cherimoyas grow in Humboldt county and can not imagine how mangoes and papayas would flourish up in the North Coast area. I've seen papayas in southern California [can't miss them since their fruits grows from the actual tree trunk] and mangoes are common but the climate here is probably 10-20 degrees warmer than Arcata. Good luck.
Yeah, I thought that was a little funny too. "NO" trees for shade, "too" hot? Obviously, the op has never been to the area. People plant shade trees. San Francisco had not a single full sized native tree in its city limits until settlers arrive. San Diego may be dry, but it's a city with a mild climate and lots of lush planted vegetation. Today's forecast for Memorial Day in SD is 68 degrees -- hardly too hot. And true, LA isn't that dry -- San Jose is even drier. So don't discount SoCal, ESPECIALLY for your subtropical fruit.

Well, I don't think subtropical fruit that needs a lot of heat will do well in Arcata, and I was not aware of how cold the summers can get actually. So think sour fruit or fruit that prefers cooler weather, like lemons, limes, feijoa. I don't know how much heat sapote really needs. My parents grow em in a hot area, and they're super sweet, so I have no basis for comparison.
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