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Old 06-15-2009, 11:19 PM
 
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This thread was posted well over a year ago. Tableguy, did you return from the river of no return?
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Old 06-16-2009, 08:43 AM
 
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Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
The Bitterroot/RONR is 300 miles across. You're proposing that if the OP wants to get into the heart of this wilderness, they should walk in and walk out? I believe they said they have 2 weeks to use, of which I assume three or four days would be spent getting to and from their drop off point. Doesn't leave enough time.

You obviously haven't been in this wilderness. It's not like other areas. You can four wheel into the backcountry there and not see anyone for days. Especially the farther you go.
Then go to a trail head deep within the park, park the car, and take a foot trail. No problems. Even from a 4 wheel trail you are only seeing a small amount of nature compared to a foot trail - get out of the jeep!

These 4 wheel drive trails - most of these were old logging roads, which means they are traveling into new growth timber - people been driving through there for a hundred years, places you think no one has set eyes on was probably a clearcut with a logging camp and outhouses 50 years ago. Nothing like walking through an old growth forest. And if you are saying you go off trail with your 4X4, well, I don't need to say how you are destroying the very nature you love.
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Old 06-22-2009, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
3,040 posts, read 10,447,315 times
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Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
Here's an interesting fact: Death iValley s the lowest point in the U.S.. while just an hour or two away are the Sierra Madres (large mountains.) On a single day, you can see, like a 60 degree or more temperature difference.
Actually, it's the Sierra Nevada that is near Death Valley. The Sierra Madres are in Mexico. Sierra Madre is also the name of a city in Los Angeles County.

Badwater (in Death Valley) is the lowest point in the U.S. at 282 feet below sea level. Mt. Whitney is the highest point in the "lower 48" states at 14,495 (plus or minus a few feet), and is less than 100 air miles from Badwater. And, yes, the temperature extremes can easily be 60 degrees or more between the two on the same day. Great point there 80skeys!
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Old 06-23-2009, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
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Originally Posted by jdavid93225 View Post
Actually, it's the Sierra Nevada that is near Death Valley. The Sierra Madres are in Mexico. Sierra Madre is also the name of a city in Los Angeles County.

Badwater (in Death Valley) is the lowest point in the U.S. at 282 feet below sea level. Mt. Whitney is the highest point in the "lower 48" states at 14,495 (plus or minus a few feet), and is less than 100 air miles from Badwater. And, yes, the temperature extremes can easily be 60 degrees or more between the two on the same day. Great point there 80skeys!
It's neat how you can go from a hot desert to a subalpine or alpine environment just by driving a couple of hours. we have similar experiences in Colorado though not as pronounced.
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Old 06-23-2009, 10:17 AM
 
12,284 posts, read 18,405,549 times
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Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
It's neat how you can go from a hot desert to a subalpine or alpine environment just by driving a couple of hours. we have similar experiences in Colorado though not as pronounced.
I like that point on the mountain passes in the Sierra's where you get from the wet and forested western slopes to the dry and arid eastern slopes, all within a mile or two. That pass in Yosemite is great - at several spots you can look over into the desert basin towards Nevada while still in an almost rain forest (or frozen forest, depending on the time of year).
You get that effect in other mountain ranges, but nothing as pronounced and dramatic as the Sierras.
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Old 06-23-2009, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
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Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
I like that point on the mountain passes in the Sierra's where you get from the wet and forested western slopes to the dry and arid eastern slopes, all within a mile or two. That pass in Yosemite is great - at several spots you can look over into the desert basin towards Nevada while still in an almost rain forest (or frozen forest, depending on the time of year).
You get that effect in other mountain ranges, but nothing as pronounced and dramatic as the Sierras.
While not in the mountains exactly, the drive up the Columbia Gorge, east of Portland, is somewhat like that. As you pass by Mt. Hood, you're in the forest, then within just a few miles, you end up in what is basically a desert by the time you reach The Dalles. It's a beautiful drive, and one I would heartily recommend.

To stay on topic, I'd venture to say that there is some awesome hiking and camping opportunities in that area.
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Old 07-20-2009, 10:51 PM
 
4,190 posts, read 11,994,785 times
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Originally Posted by jdavid93225 View Post
Badwater (in Death Valley) is the lowest point in the U.S. at 282 feet below sea level.
not only the US, but the entire western hemisphere....

and from Telescope Peak in Death Valley NP (a hike of five or six miles), you can see both Badwater and Whitney by simply turning and looking in each direction - an amazing geographical coincidence.....
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