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Old 06-27-2011, 12:50 PM
 
16,812 posts, read 9,526,531 times
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If we had adopted a universal currency a hundred years ago; the border entries would probably not have become taxation and duty collection centres and indeed, perhaps the border itself wouldn't be such a cluster-flop of an exercise that simply serves to divide rather than unite.
Europe handles that whole thing a lot more maturely in my mind.
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Old 06-30-2011, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Canackistan
746 posts, read 1,455,510 times
Reputation: 680
Default Stop b*tchin'

I'd tell us fellow Canucks to stop whining. Seriously, we complain more than any other people I have ever met around the planet. We have first world services, stable government, food, water, housing etc etc etc.

I guess it's because we have such a cushy lifestlye we find useless crap to go on and on about.

Don't believe me? Pay attention to people more enxt time you're out. Whether you're on either coast or anywhere else, you'll start to know what i'm talking about. It annoys the F--- outta me.
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Old 07-02-2011, 02:09 PM
 
188 posts, read 471,243 times
Reputation: 169
Default Be happy the way you are.

Being a Canadian who has lived in the U.S. for the last 34 years I cannot think of single solitary thing that Canada should be trying to mimic about the United States.
Who cares who has the most millionaires. Is that a big character enhancer to be a millionaire. I am not sure what the definition of a millionaire is. I doubt that one of them is: Able to sit down at their desk and write a million dollar check. If everyone had to pay off every dime they owe in the world - that is hotels, land, company debt, credit cards, vehicles- anything that payments are made on, most of the people I know that are living the high life would be stone broke. A great many have found that out in the last few years. The are former millionaires (sic) who lost everything and are now at food banks and just trying to exist.
It makes Americans real mad that I have never taken out American citizenship. As far as I am concerned I was born a Canadian and I will die a Canadian. Giving me a piece of paper and saying a few words to naturalize me (make me a "natural" American is a joke. Try it some day - Take a head of lettuce and inform it that is now a head of cabbage and see if it works.
I think Canadians care far more about poor than Americans do. It strikes fear into the hearts of Americans if they attempt to do something to help the poor that might effect the wallets of the rich.
One case in point. My wife and I have paid $650.00 a month for years for health care with a $5000.00 deductible. Pencil out and you will find we had to spend in the neighborhood of $13,000.00 a year to be covered at all (Don't forget to add on the deductible). All attempts at anything resembling reasonable prices have failed because there is an uprising by the ones have cheap insurance from their companies and the rich who know somebody is going to have to pay for it.
I read a book years ago called, I think, "The Canadians". In they compared almost every possible aspect of an American compared to a Canadian. The thing that struck me as the most amazing was the amount of property in the U.S. Canadians own. It was unbelievable. I'm talking airports, hotels, casinos, farms, resorts, and many other things. I wonder if when they do their millionaire research they count what is owned in foreign countries.
The American way is to keep up with the neighbors no matter how far they have to go in debt to do it. Maybe that is the Canadian way too now, I don't know.
One of the only times I have been ashamed of being a Canadian was the way the fans handled their loss after the Vancouver hockey games. Of course I heard lots about the "old country" over that.
Oh yes there is "eh" thing. When you cross the border you have to change that to "huh". Ex: "You are going to town, eh." Has got to be changed to: "You are going to town, huh".
That wasn't easy to change but just a hard was saying "zee" instead of "zed".
In closing I'd just like to say: Forget about your neighbors and be yourself!!
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Old 07-02-2011, 04:08 PM
 
1,315 posts, read 1,956,178 times
Reputation: 1126
America is fine. You may not like certain aspects about it, but then even as a Canadian born and raised, there are things that I do not like about Canada. There is nothing wrong about asking all Canadians if there are things that they would like to change about the national character, direction, etc.
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Old 07-04-2011, 01:24 PM
 
3,097 posts, read 4,021,734 times
Reputation: 3697
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank_Carbonni View Post
I wish Canadians were more sincere.

Barring some type dramatic demographic shift or extreme difference in political systems; Canada and the US are bound to represent each other.

For example at one time territories that are present day American states and Canadian provinces shared the continent together as part of the British Empire. Hmmm. Do you think you that being founded by the same nation, having the same language, having geography that is not dissimilar (at least in regards to the areas that border each other or near the border), and having a relatively similar demographic makeup, might cause both countries to have similar cultures regardless of media influence?

There have also been a number population swaps between the two countries. America has received French Canadians in the Upper Midwest and New England dating back to the 1700s and hundreds of thousands of professionals over the years. The Cajuns of Louisiana were originally the Acadians of Nova Scotia.

Canada receives up several hundred thousand draft dodgers during the Vietnam War. Canada received much of its black population during the pre-Civil War era via the Underground Railroad. During the 1860-1890s many Americans (most from the South and Midwest) settled in the Prairie Provinces. The town of Stonewall, Manitoba is evidence of this. Who do you think that was named after?

Canadians and Americans have been influencing each other for almost 200 years now. The main problem is once Americans accept a Canadian idea, it might as well be an American one. While when Canadians accept an American idea, it's like they feel dirty and like they've done something that now can never be undone. Like if someone traded their child's virginity for heroin.

Canadians just need to get over it. You're going to have far more in common with Americans than you'd have with any other nation whether you like it or not. And Americans are going to have far more in common with Canadians than any other nation whether they like it or not.
yes..you speak the truth...that sums it up for me...Canadians need to get over being similar to the US, It is something I just dont understand, in the english speaking world, I dont think there are two more similar countries to each other than the US and Canada, even more so than England and Australia.
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Old 07-04-2011, 01:27 PM
 
3,097 posts, read 4,021,734 times
Reputation: 3697
Quote:
Originally Posted by maclock View Post
America is fine. You may not like certain aspects about it, but then even as a Canadian born and raised, there are things that I do not like about Canada. There is nothing wrong about asking all Canadians if there are things that they would like to change about the national character, direction, etc.
exactly, heaven forbid you question the country's identity. People in the US constantly ask these questions too, why can they not be asked here?
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Old 08-06-2011, 03:49 AM
beo
 
8 posts, read 7,137 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by 13levine View Post
Being a Canadian who has lived in the U.S. for the last 34 years I cannot think of single solitary thing that Canada should be trying to mimic about the United States.
Who cares who has the most millionaires. Is that a big character enhancer to be a millionaire. I am not sure what the definition of a millionaire is. I doubt that one of them is: Able to sit down at their desk and write a million dollar check. If everyone had to pay off every dime they owe in the world - that is hotels, land, company debt, credit cards, vehicles- anything that payments are made on, most of the people I know that are living the high life would be stone broke. A great many have found that out in the last few years. The are former millionaires (sic) who lost everything and are now at food banks and just trying to exist.
It makes Americans real mad that I have never taken out American citizenship. As far as I am concerned I was born a Canadian and I will die a Canadian. Giving me a piece of paper and saying a few words to naturalize me (make me a "natural" American is a joke. Try it some day - Take a head of lettuce and inform it that is now a head of cabbage and see if it works.
I think Canadians care far more about poor than Americans do. It strikes fear into the hearts of Americans if they attempt to do something to help the poor that might effect the wallets of the rich.
One case in point. My wife and I have paid $650.00 a month for years for health care with a $5000.00 deductible. Pencil out and you will find we had to spend in the neighborhood of $13,000.00 a year to be covered at all (Don't forget to add on the deductible). All attempts at anything resembling reasonable prices have failed because there is an uprising by the ones have cheap insurance from their companies and the rich who know somebody is going to have to pay for it.
I read a book years ago called, I think, "The Canadians". In they compared almost every possible aspect of an American compared to a Canadian. The thing that struck me as the most amazing was the amount of property in the U.S. Canadians own. It was unbelievable. I'm talking airports, hotels, casinos, farms, resorts, and many other things. I wonder if when they do their millionaire research they count what is owned in foreign countries.
The American way is to keep up with the neighbors no matter how far they have to go in debt to do it. Maybe that is the Canadian way too now, I don't know.
One of the only times I have been ashamed of being a Canadian was the way the fans handled their loss after the Vancouver hockey games. Of course I heard lots about the "old country" over that.
Oh yes there is "eh" thing. When you cross the border you have to change that to "huh". Ex: "You are going to town, eh." Has got to be changed to: "You are going to town, huh".
That wasn't easy to change but just a hard was saying "zee" instead of "zed".
In closing I'd just like to say: Forget about your neighbors and be yourself!!
Either you've been in prison for the last 34 years, or you have for some strange (considering your contempt-filled statements) reason, VOLUNTARILY chosen to live in the U.S. because you PREFER it here. You sound an awful lot like my own husband, an Ontario native who's been here for 24 years (15yrs. before meeting me). He also displays feelings of contempt for the U.S., and he also obviously prefers living here. Otherwise, he'd leave. Oh wait, he did leave (and I reluctantly with him) 6 years ago. That lasted just 17 expen$ive months. And back over that border we went.

And as an American who has lived and visited Canada numerous times, I know exactly what some of the previous American posters ment when they said that Canadians have a knee-jerk tendancy to insult anything/anyone American. While at the exact same time, obsessing about our every move, and immersing themselves in our culture, even though they hate it. Taking that crap from strangers is one thing, but imagine how it feels when nearly all of your in-laws love to partake in the "Great Canadian Passtime". Sshheesshh.

Before moving to Canada, I admit that I also had the typical uninformed positive view of Canada/Canadians. But since then, my opinion has sadly changed to something just short of negative.

Beautiful country though.
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Old 08-06-2011, 08:37 AM
 
3,060 posts, read 6,959,454 times
Reputation: 3257
I'd make them a little more militant - a little more "march in the streets" to protest government stupidity when it occurs. IMHO we're a little too pacific. Apart from that . . . nothing. I love the Canadian mentality, sense of humour, friendliness and easy-going approach to life.
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Old 08-06-2011, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Aloverton
6,564 posts, read 11,913,298 times
Reputation: 9959
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickh1954 View Post
I would change our desperation to measure up.

We constantly compare and define ourselves as "not American". This often manifests itself as either a desire be more like our southern cousins, or a complete rejection of everything American.

When we discuss our home city or town, it is nearly always whether it measures up to some arbitrary standard.

This is a great country with much to be proud of. I think it is time to simply be quietly confident of that without trying so desperately to prove it.
I have noticed this a lot in discussion with Canadians, and when reading/listening to your internal discussions. It's not my place to tell any other people what to change about themselves, but this to me seems the most consistent point of national insecurity in a nation that need never feel insecure.

Canada has plenty to be proud of, and is different enough to be a 'distinct society' in its own right (okay, more than one distinct society, heh), without worries or redefinition. Certainly two enormous trading partners taking up the whole of North America and sharing a predominant language influence one another, and certainly the influence of the more populous of the two is pervasive upon the less populous. This, to me, makes the Canadian differences something in which you might take justly take even greater pride: despite being swamped in US culture just because it leaks in no matter what, the Canadian perspective has numerous visible differences. I don't go up there because of your similarities; I could go to Idaho for those. I go there because I see, feel and enjoy what differs about Canada. It's obviously not as different as Turkey or Ireland, but I think sharp observers notice it.

And given the disproportionate number of entertainers enjoying success in the US who hail from Canada, one might question the proportions of influence to begin with, given that media and pop culture are major factors. Lots of inventions, too--I wrote about them for a book.
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Old 08-06-2011, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Aloverton
6,564 posts, read 11,913,298 times
Reputation: 9959
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Until, that is, the husband felt the need to start harshing on the States. He started the topic with, "Everything in Las Vegas is over the top, just like everything else in the States. Your foreign policy, your military adventurism, your politics...what is it with you Americans? Blah blah blah blah..." His wife looked embarrassed and asked him a couple of times to cool it. He finally did, but not before he cast a pall over what heretofore had been a great conversation. Shortly thereafter, my wife and I paid our check and left.
That isn't just a Canadian thing, though. Americans get that in many places. I got it in Ireland, at least, and in Greece, and I hear of it many other places. I even hear of it here, from people who come here from abroad to visit--and evidently think it's good manners to come here and tell me all my country's shortcomings. Like it or not, everyone has an opinion about us, and like it or not, it gets shared. I don't much like feeling like I'm being held personally accountable for our foreign or domestic policy (and even less so considering my enormous level of dissent from both), but that's just the way it is, and is going to be. Life isn't fair, people often don't think, and a measure of getting along is how to get through those situations without too much stress. Every nation has some sort of cross to bear and if it weren't that one, it'd be something else.
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