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Old 08-31-2010, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD
741 posts, read 2,498,588 times
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Originally Posted by sunshineleith View Post
DING DING DING - wake up everyone! It's troll time!
can I play!
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Old 09-01-2010, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by lisalan View Post
I majored in history and yes they teach canadian history. In my opinion US history IS much more interesting than canadian history.
I am not suggesting that Canadian history is more interesting than that of the United States or of any other country. My point is that Canadian history is not boring to the point where it should be virtually ignored. Especially not when it is the history of your own country, to boot.

I think we should all remember that the Americans have done a fantastic job of national myth-making, often involving events that at first glance don't appear particularly significant. And millions of Canadians have bought into this... hook, line and sinker.

Betsy Ross sewing the first American flag is not necessarily any more earth-shattering than the driving of the last spike in Canada's transcontinental railway or what Laura Secord did during the War of 1812.
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Old 09-01-2010, 08:14 AM
 
Location: grooving in the city
7,371 posts, read 5,682,556 times
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I am not suggesting that Canadian history is more interesting than that of the United States or of any other country. My point is that Canadian history is not boring to the point where it should be virtually ignored. Especially not when it is the history of your own country, to boot.

I think we should all remember that the Americans have done a fantastic job of national myth-making, often involving events that at first glance don't appear particularly significant. And millions of Canadians have bought into this... hook, line and sinker.

Betsy Ross sewing the first American flag is not necessarily any more earth-shattering than the driving of the last spike in Canada's transcontinental railway or what Laura Secord did during the War of 1812.
Exactly. The dramatic presentation and interpretation of American history, made it more interesting in my high school years that Canadian history. Canadian history is no less interesting and fascinating. The stories of Vimy, Passchaendale, David Thompson, the Aboriginal people and the fur trade are no less interesting. The invasion of Canada by the U.S., the United Empire Loyalists, Louis Riel, I could go on and on, but I won't.
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Old 09-01-2010, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,150,248 times
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In my Canadian History class, @ Concordia we didn't learn a single thing about Canada's role in the British Empire (Sudan in 1886, for example) and strangely Canada was presented as being a practically independent country from 1776 on and especially 1868 on. I don't understand why 1868 is viewed across Canada as the year of Canada's birth when the people were British subjects until 1947 and didn't decide foreign policy until 1931, the British supplied the navy, the military was mostly militia etc. By the same logic the US came into birth in the 1600's or something. I do think that some of the confusion is because "Canada" has been so difficult to define. It wasn't "really" independent until after WWII, the queen isn't "really" the head of state anymore but technically is, does a Canadian speak French, English, both, or neither, if Canadian culture = multiculturalism what were the people who lived in Quebec or Ontario in 1840 "really"!? So when you have a class about Canada, what exactly do you learn? Who exactly was "Canadian" or the predecessors to today's state of Canada - who should we learn about? Do we learn about the Canadiens, or the English Speaking people living in the US who would later move in with the Canadiens onto the territory of the Empire and be called English-Canadians?

@ Acajack I completely agree with you in regards to events like "the Betsy Ross Flag", Canada has a plethora of interesting situations and events which are strangely ignored (what other country or territory with a significant population on this side of the world remained part of a European country!"). What other country or territory with a significant population on this side of the world remained part of a European country? What other country with a significant population has enabled French and English speaking people to share the same government on this side of the world? Canada DIDN't just sit above the US from 1776-1914, they were an integral part of the British Empire (arguably the most integral after India) and people born in Canada who would be considered "Canadian" took part in all campaigns of the Empire from wars to colonization to administration. Canada was far from a peaceful, non-interventionist country which sat around waiting for others to act!

Canadian history is definitely my favorite out of all the new world countries.
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Old 09-01-2010, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,478 posts, read 6,189,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
In my Canadian History class, @ Concordia we didn't learn a single thing about Canada's role in the British Empire (Sudan in 1886, for example) and strangely Canada was presented as being a practically independent country from 1776 on and especially 1868 on. I don't understand why 1868 is viewed across Canada as the year of Canada's birth when the people were British subjects until 1947 and didn't decide foreign policy until 1931, the British supplied the navy, the military was mostly militia etc. By the same logic the US came into birth in the 1600's or something. I do think that some of the confusion is because "Canada" has been so difficult to define. It wasn't "really" independent until after WWII, the queen isn't "really" the head of state anymore but technically is, does a Canadian speak French, English, both, or neither, if Canadian culture = multiculturalism what were the people who lived in Quebec or Ontario in 1840 "really"!? So when you have a class about Canada, what exactly do you learn? Who exactly was "Canadian" or the predecessors to today's state of Canada - who should we learn about? Do we learn about the Canadiens, or the English Speaking people living in the US who would later move in with the Canadiens onto the territory of the Empire and be called English-Canadians?

@ Acajack I completely agree with you in regards to events like "the Betsy Ross Flag", Canada has a plethora of interesting situations and events which are strangely ignored (what other country or territory with a significant population on this side of the world remained part of a European country!"). What other country or territory with a significant population on this side of the world remained part of a European country? What other country with a significant population has enabled French and English speaking people to share the same government on this side of the world? Canada DIDN't just sit above the US from 1776-1914, they were an integral part of the British Empire (arguably the most integral after India) and people born in Canada who would be considered "Canadian" took part in all campaigns of the Empire from wars to colonization to administration. Canada was far from a peaceful, non-interventionist country which sat around waiting for others to act!

Canadian history is definitely my favorite out of all the new world countries.
1868 is the year the Canadian Army was created by the Federal Militia Act so I suppose that is why it would be emphasized as an important date in Canadian history. It would not be the same as saying the US came into existence in the 1600s because it was the War of Independence that created the US as it presently exists. What existed before that War was a different country as a matter of law.

Saying Canada wasn't 'really' independent until after the second World War is like saying that Britain isn't really a democracy because it has a monarchy. I think you are are getting stuck on old notions of what independence means.
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Old 09-01-2010, 11:50 AM
 
397 posts, read 607,453 times
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I would date Canada's independence from the end of WW1. We entered the war automatically when Britain declared war, with no right to refuse.

Due to the sacrifice and impact of Canadian soldiers we were recognized as a separate signatory at the treaty of Versailles. From that point forward Canada was considered free to join Britain's future wars or not, although practically there was never any doubt Canada would support the Mother Country in any conflict.

It is difficult to pin an exact date on Canada's emergence as a sovereign nation because we are the result of evolution, rather than revolution.
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Old 09-01-2010, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD
741 posts, read 2,498,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickh1954 View Post
I would date Canada's independence from the end of WW1. We entered the war automatically when Britain declared war, with no right to refuse.

Due to the sacrifice and impact of Canadian soldiers we were recognized as a separate signatory at the treaty of Versailles. From that point forward Canada was considered free to join Britain's future wars or not, although practically there was never any doubt Canada would support the Mother Country in any conflict.

It is difficult to pin an exact date on Canada's emergence as a sovereign nation because we are the result of evolution, rather than revolution.
This is quite accurate and if you were paying attention in class would understand that this was sort of where Canada started being considered a separate nation and not just a subject of the Commonwealth from the BNAct of 1867.
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Old 09-01-2010, 01:03 PM
 
9,972 posts, read 14,024,392 times
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When I moved to Alberta from the US as a kid--my 3rd grade teacher asked my mom if I would need to be taught separately in history class---since they believed an American would never be interested in Canadian history. Luckily I was able to struggle through Canadian history even with my inherent disability as a Yank...

I remember one time someone did a 4th grade class presentation of Sir Issac Brock as a great Canadian hero of the War of 1812--and ended with a rousing declaration that "he killed a lot of those darn Americans", to which everyone in the class turned around and stared at me, the lone American in the classroom.

Canadian history is sort of interesting--it just doesn't have the big conflicts of US or even Mexican history that are easy to teach and remember. I did love (and still remember) all the fur trade related history--I remember a game we would play outdoors as part of class where we would take on the roles of members of the Hudson's Bay Company, their rivals of the Northwest Company, or the native peoples.
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Old 09-02-2010, 04:20 AM
 
3,060 posts, read 6,945,144 times
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Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
. . . Canadian history is sort of interesting . . . I did love (and still remember) all the fur trade related history--I remember a game we would play outdoors as part of class where we would take on the roles of members of the Hudson's Bay Company, their rivals of the Northwest Company, or the native peoples.
Ah now that brings back memories. I found that stuff fascinating!! Also the conflicts between England and France and the deportation of the Acadians to the southern USA, Louis Riel and his gang etc. It was the prime ministers and history of the development of the governments of Upper and Lower Canada and all that muck that had me nodding off LOL. Now if you ask me about dates . . . not a hope apart from 1755 and 1867 . . .
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Old 09-02-2010, 04:24 AM
 
3,060 posts, read 6,945,144 times
Reputation: 3252
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickh1954 View Post
I would date Canada's independence from the end of WW1. We entered the war automatically when Britain declared war, with no right to refuse.

Due to the sacrifice and impact of Canadian soldiers we were recognized as a separate signatory at the treaty of Versailles. From that point forward Canada was considered free to join Britain's future wars or not, although practically there was never any doubt Canada would support the Mother Country in any conflict.

It is difficult to pin an exact date on Canada's emergence as a sovereign nation because we are the result of evolution, rather than revolution.
We certainly didn't support the 'mother country' in the Iraq fiasco. I wonder if that means we are now "independent"?
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