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Old 10-22-2010, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
216 posts, read 320,287 times
Reputation: 108

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I have a question, just out of curiosity. I know that Canada won't accept people who the Canadian gov't believes will be a financial burden on society. To that end, a candidate for immigration must have "a valid offer of arranged employment" or "have had one year of continuous full-time or equivalent part-time paid work experience" in an eligible occupation in the last 10 years, according to the Citizenship and Immigration Canada website.

My question is: Where would a young disabled person with a good private disability income (enough to live comfortably, but not lavishly) fall in the immigration process? What if they could meet the experience requirement (stated above) and the point requirements for Canadian residency? How successful would they be at receiving Canadian residency?

What if, in addition to the above, that person was able to work part-time (just not full-time) without being penalized by having money deducted from their disability payment? This person would clearly NOT be a burden on Canadian society. How would they fare in the immigration process?

Any insight would be appreciated. I just haven't seen the above type of situation addressed, and I'm curious to know how it would be viewed by immigration authorities.
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Old 10-22-2010, 11:21 AM
 
705 posts, read 1,515,203 times
Reputation: 284
Most likely a disabled person doesn't fall into the "skilled workers" category and therefore will not be considered as being able to contribute to the Canadian economy. If she or he will solely rely on disability income from elsewhere, he/she will pay no income tax whatsoever in Canada but will still eligible for all the social benefit the country offers. In this sense, this person will be a burden to the country as he/she contributes nothing to the society but enjoys benefits such as health care etc.

The issue here is not whether a person will become a burdern, but whether a person can make a net contribution to the country (provide skills, create jobs, or simply bring in cash). Otherwise, immigration will become charity.
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Old 10-22-2010, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
216 posts, read 320,287 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkgg7 View Post
Most likely a disabled person doesn't fall into the "skilled workers" category and therefore will not be considered as being able to contribute to the Canadian economy. If she or he will solely rely on disability income from elsewhere, he/she will pay no income tax whatsoever in Canada but will still eligible for all the social benefit the country offers. In this sense, this person will be a burden to the country as he/she contributes nothing to the society but enjoys benefits such as health care etc.

The issue here is not whether a person will become a burdern, but whether a person can make a net contribution to the country (provide skills, create jobs, or simply bring in cash). Otherwise, immigration will become charity.
Thanks for replying, but you didn't answer the question based on the information presented. The disabled person CAN fall into the skilled workers category because of two reasons: 1) they have the required work experience and education, and 2) they ARE able to work, just not 40 hours a week. That was clearly stated in the OP.

The CIC website didn't give specifics, and didn't say anything even similar to what you said, that I saw. Can you point me to something on the site that backs up what you wrote, or are you giving me an answer based on your opinion? If you are, thanks for your input, but that's really not what I was looking for. I was hoping for an answer based in fact and not personal opinion.
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Old 10-22-2010, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario
106 posts, read 302,691 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyRo View Post
I have a question, just out of curiosity. I know that Canada won't accept people who the Canadian gov't believes will be a financial burden on society. To that end, a candidate for immigration must have "a valid offer of arranged employment" or "have had one year of continuous full-time or equivalent part-time paid work experience" in an eligible occupation in the last 10 years, according to the Citizenship and Immigration Canada website.

My question is: Where would a young disabled person with a good private disability income (enough to live comfortably, but not lavishly) fall in the immigration process? What if they could meet the experience requirement (stated above) and the point requirements for Canadian residency? How successful would they be at receiving Canadian residency?

What if, in addition to the above, that person was able to work part-time (just not full-time) without being penalized by having money deducted from their disability payment? This person would clearly NOT be a burden on Canadian society. How would they fare in the immigration process?

Any insight would be appreciated. I just haven't seen the above type of situation addressed, and I'm curious to know how it would be viewed by immigration authorities.
Hey why not? Sheesh we take in drug lords form other countries, some refugees that feed off our system and don't bother to work here legitimately, Tamils etc.... Just wonderful!

Hell I'd rather see you here than any one them! At least you are willing to work (be it part time) pay taxes, offer an educational background and can survive in a self sufficient manner.
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Old 10-22-2010, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
216 posts, read 320,287 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shamrock47 View Post
Hey why not? Sheesh we take in drug lords form other countries, some refugees that feed off our system and don't bother to work here legitimately, Tamils etc.... Just wonderful!

Hell I'd rather see you here than any one them! At least you are willing to work (be it part time) pay taxes, offer an educational background and can survive in a self sufficient manner.
[SIZE=3] [/SIZE]
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You sound like a lot of frustrated Americans.
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Old 10-22-2010, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Toronto
1,655 posts, read 4,977,071 times
Reputation: 805
Quote:
Originally Posted by shamrock47 View Post
hey why not? Sheesh we take in drug lords form other countries, some refugees that feed off our system and don't bother to work here legitimately, tamils etc.... Just wonderful!

hell i'd rather see you here than any one them! At least you are willing to work (be it part time) pay taxes, offer an educational background and can survive in a self sufficient manner.
+1

And best of all.... she can ACTUALLY speak the language!
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Old 10-22-2010, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,109 posts, read 5,836,790 times
Reputation: 7382
Something that has come up in the news periodically, regarding would-be immigrants with disabilities has been the drain they might be on the health care system, which is free to everyone.So what I think is that while you might qualify under the skilled worker aspect, you might be disqualified depending on the nature of your disability and whether you might reasonably be expected to need expensive medical care.

I don't know how the cases I've read about were resolved.
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Old 10-23-2010, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
14 posts, read 42,976 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyRo View Post
Thanks for replying, but you didn't answer the question based on the information presented. The disabled person CAN fall into the skilled workers category because of two reasons: 1) they have the required work experience and education, and 2) they ARE able to work, just not 40 hours a week. That was clearly stated in the OP.

The CIC website didn't give specifics, and didn't say anything even similar to what you said, that I saw. Can you point me to something on the site that backs up what you wrote, or are you giving me an answer based on your opinion? If you are, thanks for your input, but that's really not what I was looking for. I was hoping for an answer based in fact and not personal opinion.
Since he/she have specific experience in one of this professions:
* 0631 Restaurant and Food Service Managers
* 0811 Primary Production Managers (Except Agriculture)
* 1122 Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management
* 1233 Insurance Adjusters and Claims Examiners
* 2121 Biologists and Related Scientists
* 2151 Architects
* 3111 Specialist Physicians
* 3112 General Practitioners and Family Physicians
* 3113 Dentists
* 3131 Pharmacists
* 3142 Physiotherapists
* 3152 Registered Nurses
* 3215 Medical Radiation Technologists
* 3222 Dental Hygienists & Dental Therapists
* 3233 Licensed Practical Nurses
* 4151 Psychologists
* 4152 Social Workers
* 6241 Chefs
* 6242 Cooks
* 7215 Contractors and Supervisors, Carpentry Trades
* 7216 Contractors and Supervisors, Mechanic Trades
* 7241 Electricians (Except Industrial & Power System)
* 7242 Industrial Electricians
* 7251 Plumbers
* 7265 Welders & Related Machine Operators
* 7312 Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics
* 7371 Crane Operators
* 7372 Drillers & Blasters - Surface Mining, Quarrying & Construction
* 8222 Supervisors, Oil and Gas Drilling and Service

what is the problem to try. Or just to ask local CIC office. I passed the federal skilled worker process year ago and never mentioned in the papers, requirements not to be disabled person.
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Old 10-23-2010, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,024 posts, read 9,737,871 times
Reputation: 8846
I think that your best bet would be to call an immigration lawyer. A lot of them have a free initial consultation. You could move to Canada just as a visitor and I think you can stay for 6 months at a time. You might want to go home to Ga. for a week or so every 6 months anyway. You would have to purchase healthcare insurance for when you are here. you would really be able to find out how much you liked it here as your immigration case progressed.
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Old 10-23-2010, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,109 posts, read 5,836,790 times
Reputation: 7382
A Google search of "disabled persons immigration Canada" turned up quite a few sites. Here are two links: » Deaf Issues » Canadian Association of the Deaf (http://www.cad.ca/en/issues/immigration_and_medical_admissibility.asp - broken link)

The Canada Immigration Act requires persons with disabilities that might result in "excessive demands" on the health care system be rejected as potential immigrants. However, there is another link referencing a case in which the Supreme Court ruled differently on a specific case. Ruling in Canada may affect processing of disabled immigrants
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