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Old 03-23-2011, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
9,361 posts, read 13,081,282 times
Reputation: 4001

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenRyan View Post
I would like to live in an area where the cost of living is lower than the United States. Is the cost of living lower in Canada?
How is the Canadian health care system? I've hard mixed reviews.
As far as activism goes, I'm interested in Autonomy and self determination, I like to be in a progressive environment. I'm anti-World Trade Organization and pro-democracy.
Do many cities in Canada have public transportation?
what does that mean you want to live in the forrest and of the land?
hmm well as a person the gre up in B.C. alot of people go into the forrests and never come out and search and recuse has to find them it is a harsh place to go into out vast forrest unless you know what your doing.

I go off-roading and you can drive for hours on old logging roads and not see anybody so being preapared is important but I live in the suburbs though a week or two camping is enough for me

 
Old 03-23-2011, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
9,361 posts, read 13,081,282 times
Reputation: 4001
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucknow View Post
I had a good friend who sounded just like you. I'll tell you what he did. He took himself and his dog Rip and moved way up in the Peace river district of BC. He found himself a nice site on crown land up there and just occupied it and built himself and Rip a cabin out of the logs he cut himself.

The first few years were relly hard but he perservered, hunting and fishing his own food and trapping for some cash money. He built himself a good solid boat and started travelling up and down the river meeting people making contacts. He continued to improve his cabin and his property and started getting people flying in,for him to guide on fishing and hunting trips. He made some really good money at that and even got a generator, a horse, and a snow machine. He did this for about 20 years and then sold out to a guy who wanted to take over. He then took up big rig driving and is still doing that today.

Now the reason I related this little story to you is. There is no cost of living up there. You survive by the sweat of your own butt and if not you die. You say you are interested in autonomy and self detirmination? Well Martin sure had that all right. How does "How is the health care system"? square with autonomy and self detirmination? If you are those things, you look after yourself and improvise and depend on your friends when you need them. You won't need public transportation because there is no public. You look after yourself. If you need something you hop in the canoe and go get it. You won't need to worry about the WTO at all. You will be more focused on keeping yourself alive by your own autonomous self detirmined methods. As for your desire for a progressive environment? Up there it's an untouched environment. You will create your own progressive environment or go crawling back to civilization where everything is done for you!
or search and recsue is dispacthed to find him and save him Canada has a very harsh climate thar requires the person to be well prepared to even think about going out into places with little to no pepople
 
Old 03-23-2011, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
8,993 posts, read 4,903,486 times
Reputation: 7331
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTOlover View Post
or search and recsue is dispacthed to find him and save him Canada has a very harsh climate thar requires the person to be well prepared to even think about going out into places with little to no pepople
If you plan, practise and are prepared then you can do it. My friend Martin grew up in Toronto and decided he would homestead in the wilds of BC. It took him 2 years to prepare for it and he did it. My reply to the OP was sarcastic by the way. He talks about independence and autonomy and then asks about transit systems and health care, LOL. Just look at all the American draft dodger hippies that moved all along the coast north of Tofino in the 60's and 70's. They are still there and they are independent and autonomous.
 
Old 03-24-2011, 02:26 AM
 
Location: British Columbia, Canada
1,877 posts, read 1,941,978 times
Reputation: 2125
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenRyan View Post
I would like to live in an area where the cost of living is lower than the United States. Is the cost of living lower in Canada?
How is the Canadian health care system? I've hard mixed reviews.
As far as activism goes, I'm interested in Autonomy and self determination, I like to be in a progressive environment. I'm anti-World Trade Organization and pro-democracy.
Do many cities in Canada have public transportation?
Oh well, I think you're kind of SOL then. The cost of living anywhere in Canada is much, much higher than United States and it costs more to live in British Columbia than other parts of Canada. And world trade, well Canada depends on world trade even more than the USA does.

.
 
Old 03-24-2011, 04:11 PM
 
10 posts, read 12,796 times
Reputation: 13
Default I don't want to live off the land

I want to shift the discussion away from wanting live off the land. That is not what I'm looking for. If you can't understand what autonomy and self-determination is then private message me.

How is the healthcare system in Canada?
Lucknow your first post was benefical, but every post after that was not useful.
 
Old 03-27-2011, 10:08 PM
 
Location: British Columbia, Canada
1,877 posts, read 1,941,978 times
Reputation: 2125
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenRyan View Post
How is the healthcare system in Canada?
It's okay. You can look at some of the Canadian healthcare topics here:
http://www.city-data.com/forum/searc...rchid=28135337

.
 
Old 03-28-2011, 03:30 AM
 
Location: British Columbia, Canada
1,877 posts, read 1,941,978 times
Reputation: 2125
Oh, that link doesn't work now, it worked when I posted it.

Well, just go to the advanced forum search function and type in 'Canadian healthcare' as keywords, then choose Canada for the forum, and hit search. That will take you to all the topics about it.

.
 
Old 03-31-2011, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
9,361 posts, read 13,081,282 times
Reputation: 4001
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenRyan View Post
I want to shift the discussion away from wanting live off the land. That is not what I'm looking for. If you can't understand what autonomy and self-determination is then private message me.

How is the healthcare system in Canada?
Lucknow your first post was benefical, but every post after that was not useful.
it means you want to live in society but by one's own rule which you can't do in canada beecause squatting and coming into violent confrontation with the police does not benfit canada or canadians because that adds nothing of value our country. an anarchist is not really going to create jobs and contribute to a healthy economy.

now if you were a doctor, nurse or meachical engineer then sure you could immigrate here

Last edited by GTOlover; 03-31-2011 at 09:33 PM..
 
Old 03-31-2011, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
9,361 posts, read 13,081,282 times
Reputation: 4001
you cannot immigrate here unless you meet the required amount of points and have atleast some sort of a post secondary education

Skilled workers are people who are selected as permanent residents based on their ability to become economically established in Canada.
Federal skilled worker applications are assessed for eligibility according to the criteria set out below.

For your application to be eligible for processing, you must:
  • include the results of your official language proficiency test, AND
  • have a valid offer of arranged employment, OR
  • have one year of continuous full-time paid work experience in at least one of the occupations listed here.
Work experience minimum requirements
If your application is eligible for processing, it will then be assessed against minimum requirements.

Your work experience must be:
  • for at least one year, continuous, and paid (full-time or the equivalent in part-time), AND
  • Skill Type 0 (managerial occupations) or Skill Level A (professional occupations) or B (technical occupations and skilled trades) on the Canadian National Occupational Classification (NOC) list, AND
  • within the last 10 years.
If you meet the above minimum requirements, your application will be processed according to the six selection factors in the skilled worker points grid , which are:
  • your education
  • your abilities in English and/or French, Canada’s two official languages
  • your work experience
  • your age
  • whether you have arranged employment in Canada, and
  • your adaptability.
You must also show that you have enough money to support yourself and your dependants after you arrive in Canada.
Note: If you are applying under one of the 29 eligible occupations, as of June 26, 2010, a maximum of 20,000 Federal Skilled Worker applications will be considered for processing in the following 12 months. Within the 20,000 cap, a maximum of 1,000 Federal Skilled Worker applications per eligible occupation will be considered for processing each year.

These limits do not apply to applications with an offer of arranged employment.

If you are not sure if you should apply as a skilled worker, you can:
  • use the eligibility tool to get an idea of whether your application would be eligible for processing, then
  • try a self-assessment test to see if you might earn enough points to qualify.
Immigrating to Canada: Skilled workers and professionals - Who can apply

Last edited by Cornerguy1; 04-01-2011 at 01:22 PM.. Reason: orphaned material removed
 
Old 03-31-2011, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
9,361 posts, read 13,081,282 times
Reputation: 4001
To be eligible to become a Canadian citizen, you must meet the requirements in all of the following areas:Age

You must be at least 18 years old to apply for Canadian citizenship.
To apply for citizenship for a child under 18, make sure the following conditions are met:
  • the person applying is the child’s parent, adoptive parent or legal guardian
  • the child is a permanent resident, but does not need to have lived in Canada for three years; and
  • one parent is already a Canadian citizen or is applying to become a citizen at the same time. This also applies to adoptive parents.
Permanent resident status

To become a Canadian citizen, you must have permanent resident status in Canada, and that status must not be in doubt. This means you must not be the subject of an immigration investigation, an immigration inquiry or a removal order (an order from Canadian officials to leave Canada).
Time lived in Canada

To become Canadian citizens, adults must have lived in Canada for at least three years (1,095 days) in the past four years before applying. Children under the age of 18 do not need to meet this requirement.
You may be able to count time you spent in Canada before you became a permanent resident if that time falls within the four-year period.
Use the citizenship calculator to find out if you have lived in Canada long enough to apply for citizenship.
Language abilities

Canada has two official languages—English and French. You need to have adequate knowledge of one of these two languages in order to become a Canadian citizen.
The citizenship knowledge test and your interaction with CIC staff will be used to assess if you have an adequate ability to communicate in either English or French. CIC staff will observe
  • your ability to understand basic spoken statements and questions, and
  • your ability to communicate basic information or respond to questions.
For example, as part of your interaction with departmental staff or as part of your written test or your interview with a citizenship judge, you will be expected to:
  • answer simple questions on familiar topics, using short sentences;
  • show that you know enough words for basic everyday communication;
  • tell a simple story about everyday activities;
  • speak about something you did in the past (or will do in the future);
  • give simple everyday instructions and directions; and
  • express satisfaction or dissatisfaction.
Criminal history (prohibitions)

You cannot become a citizen if you:
  • have been convicted of an indictable (criminal) offence or an offence under the Citizenship Act in the three years before you applied;
  • are currently charged with an indictable offence or an offence under the Citizenship Act;
  • are in prison, on parole or on probation;
  • are under a removal order (have been ordered by Canadian officials to leave Canada);
  • are under investigation for, are charged with, or have been convicted of a war crime or a crime against humanity; or
  • you have had your Canadian citizenship taken away in the past five years.
If you are on probation or are charged with an offence and are awaiting trial, you should wait until after the probation has ended or the trial is over to apply for citizenship.
If you have spent time on probation, on parole or in prison in the last four years, you may not meet the residence requirement for citizenship.
Time in prison or on parole does not count as residence in Canada. Time on probation also does not count as residence in Canada if you were convicted of an offence. If you have spent time on probation from a conditional discharge, it may be counted toward residence. For details, contact the Call Centre.
Knowledge of Canada

To become a citizen, you must understand the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, such as the right and responsibility to vote in elections. You must also have an understanding of Canada’s history, values, institutions and symbols.
The information you need to know is in our free study guide Discover Canada: The Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship. We will send you a copy of it once we have received your application. The questions in the citizenship test are based on the information in this guide.
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