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Old 09-18-2011, 02:53 PM
 
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What would it take for the Yukon to become a province and is there any advantage for it to do so?
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Old 09-18-2011, 03:28 PM
 
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Default Not Likely

Have you been to the Yukon? I have, many times. Some of the most beautiful country I have seen. Rugged, and very sparsely populated. Something like half of the people there live in Whitehorse, a town that I really love to visit.

There is not much infrastructure in the Yukon. I don't see why it would become a Province and I have never heard of any movement in that direction. They do not produce much of anything for export, and are consumers mostly. Things get shipped there but little gets shipped out.

By the way I am an Alaskan, the population here is about 10 times that of the Yukon, I don't claim to know much of anything about Canadian politics but Yukoners seem to be proud to be called a Territory and I don't think they want anything to change.
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Old 09-18-2011, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Aloverton
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanhawk View Post
What would it take for the Yukon to become a province and is there any advantage for it to do so?
Offhand, I would guess that one major reason against the idea is it would add a layer of bureaucracy serving little purpose. I'm not sure of my figures, but I think there are no more than 40,000 people in the YT and 25,000 of them in Whitehorse. Seems most economical and convenient to just have it continue as a territory directly under the national government.
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Old 09-18-2011, 08:37 PM
 
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The Yukon will never become a province, just like the other two territories won't, because the population is too small and it's more beneficial for the federal government to have them as a territory.

I've seen this brought up before, but I don't see why people think the Yukon should be a province.
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Old 09-19-2011, 09:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by poscstudent View Post
The Yukon will never become a province, just like the other two territories won't, because the population is too small and it's more beneficial for the federal government to have them as a territory.

I've seen this brought up before, but I don't see why people think the Yukon should be a province.
Which begs the questions to be asked:

What qualifies a territory to become a province? What are the differences between one or the other?
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Old 09-19-2011, 06:11 PM
 
Location: CFL
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Officially it takes a constitutional amendment to create a new province.. Was some talk about it here.. Northern territories 'eventually' to be given provincial status - Canada - CBC News
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Old 09-20-2011, 04:45 PM
 
233 posts, read 451,206 times
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Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
Which begs the questions to be asked:

What qualifies a territory to become a province? What are the differences between one or the other?
Population is probably one of the biggest things.

I can't remember how it all works off the top of my head, but as it stands now the federal government makes more money from the three territories then they would if they were three provinces. I believe it has to do with the natural resources revenue.
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Old 09-20-2011, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
Which begs the questions to be asked:

What qualifies a territory to become a province? What are the differences between one or the other?
The most important difference is how how power is delegated (outlined in Sections 91-92 of the constitution act, if you're curious enough to sort through legal speak). The act outlines specific provincial and federal rights and responsibilities - however, the territories don't have provincial status, so are completely subject to federal power.

There's no actual population number that needs to be met to create a province, legally speaking (Manitoba managed it with just 25,000 people). However, there's probably a practical number that any of the current territories would need to have. Since a large amount of infrastructure would be downloaded to the new province. They'd have to have a large enough tax base to cover all their new fiscal responsibilities.

As for whether the Yukon will become a province - I'd bet on the Northwest Territories achieving it first, as it's population is growing at double the speed of the Yukon's, and it would be able to take a large amount of royalty money from natural resources to help alleviate it's new found costs.
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Old 09-25-2011, 08:04 AM
 
Location: on the road to new job
324 posts, read 587,226 times
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Originally Posted by kanhawk View Post
What would it take for the Yukon to become a province and is there any advantage for it to do so?
I really hope NOT
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Old 09-28-2011, 07:36 PM
 
13 posts, read 22,597 times
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Eventually probably. Like maybe by the midpoint of this century.
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