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Old 12-10-2011, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
9,712 posts, read 10,394,867 times
Reputation: 3754
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
It's hard to tell an American in Canada but it's much easier abroad. Most American regional accents don't sound Canadian, only American Standard sounds like it could be from Canada, traditional New England, Midwestern, Californian etc. accents are recognizable not to mention of course the southern ones. And I find there are certain types of body language, manners of speaking, and other things that are typical of those who've grown up in parts of the United States. It's a bunch of things, but one can usually tell an American if you meet one in, say, Amsterdam.
There are the extremes of course: people who talk loudly with a Texas accent in a Parisian café or a guy wearing a Team Canada hockey jersey and a Roots cap in the Plaka in Athens,

...but there is still a huge group in the middle (which is to say most people) of Americans and Canadians whom, to me, are pretty much indistinguishable from each other unless you actually sit down and talk to them for a while.

 
Old 12-10-2011, 11:19 AM
 
Location: BOY-see
4,325 posts, read 6,717,224 times
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To pass for Canadian at first glance, I just use my inside voice, and any time I would normally say 'excuse me', I say 'soory', fairly quickly and with a brief smile. If in winter, I wear a toque. Helps one not stand out.
 
Old 12-10-2011, 12:28 PM
 
294 posts, read 257,404 times
Reputation: 238
Less fake people? Also whats wrong with using your indoor voice in public, its pretty common in most parts of the industrialized world, especially Europe. Oh and theres this concept called respect, maybe some people don't want to exchange pleasantries with some stranger, not everyone is an extrovert, maybe thats why they're "reserved" because it's not polite to start a conversation with every random person you bump into.

Oh and on the indoor voice in public, have you ever ridden any form of public transportation in the states where half the riders have their children with them, the kids are practically yelling and then you have the parents yelling over everyone else's conversations... **** is annoying as ****. I've ridden trains, streetcars, and buses in Germany and people are way more considerate, so quiet you can hear the heater or A/C humming.
 
Old 12-11-2011, 04:10 PM
 
423 posts, read 654,464 times
Reputation: 320
Quote:
I think demeanor and familiarity is the telling point with tourists from other countries. You say you're Canadian born but did you live in Canada a long time before moving to USA or did you move to USA as a very young child? When you travel to Canada now, do you demonstrate that you're knowledgeable about Canada or do you ask a lot of questions? Here on the board, without me knowing where you actually live I might have considered you to be a long time Canadian resident because in past posts you've demonstrated you're quite knowledgeable, understanding and fairly non-judgemental about Canada.
Well, thanks for mistaking me, Zoisite - born and raised in the U.S. to Canadian parents, and actually (ha ha) grew up Texas for a good part of it, traded the accent for "standard" North American when I went north to college.

Quote:
... have you ever ridden any form of public transportation in the states where half the riders have their children with them, the kids are practically yelling and then you have the parents yelling over everyone else's conversations...
I've commuted by public transit in several cities (San Fran and Denver) and never felt there to be a problem - as long as people are not smelly and obnoxious. These boards are replete with Torontonians who lament they never meet strangers (of the opposite gender) on public transit - well its about the same here in the U.S. Heck, I'm glad to see folks with children on transit - as an urban planner, I'm kinda tired of people telling me, "transit just doesn't work for families with children," as if its self-evident.

Quote:
It's a bunch of things, but one can usually tell an American if you meet one in, say, Amsterdam.
Funny story, I was on a boat ("boot"?) tour in Amsterdam and there was an obnoxious group of Americans hassling the tour guide, and then when she got to my group and asked where we were from, and we told her, she said, "Oh, you're American TOO?" My point is if one is looking for Americans with the assumption that they are disruptive and obnoxious, you'll see the ten percent who are (and peg then as Americans) and totally miss the rest of us ... and the fact that young Canadians feel the need to cover all their belongings with the maple leaf flag shows Europeans would have a hard time telling and American from a Canadian ...
 
Old 12-12-2011, 12:30 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,693 posts, read 18,024,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by docwatson View Post
Uh ... and how does one tell who is an American tourist? I'm sure there's a good number of 19-20 year olds who come to Canada for the obvious reason (drinking age) and cause a ruckus. But even then how would you know if they are American or Canadian? I have travelled to Canada many times and the only way people know I am American is if I tell them. I mean, its not as if I have a big Texas accent and an American flag bandana.

Oh, wait, since I was born Canadian maybe I really look like a Canadian?
Well this is after I find out they are Americans, or pick it up through conversation or something. A lot of them definitely believe America is the centre of the world.
 
Old 12-12-2011, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
5,731 posts, read 2,749,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Well this is after I find out they are Americans, or pick it up through conversation or something. A lot of them definitely believe America is the centre of the world.
If you wanna play the stereotyping game I could say the same about Austrlians who go on and on about "the lucky country" and "god's own country" bs. Some of them are real boors to be around.
 
Old 12-12-2011, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Urban Coastal California
1,422 posts, read 2,419,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Americans have a tendency to make comparisons between Canada and USA and often make personal comments about other people, whereas visitors from other countries don't do that so much.

.
Honestly when one group hardly thinks of the other, then there is not even a springboard towards a "comparison". In other words, most Americans do not even think about Canada so it is more the reverse that you say- that Canadians are far far more likely to compare their country to the US (for various reasons you are well aware of) than the other way around.

Just because you have some personal issue against a certain perspective doesnt mean my perspective is representative of 300 over million people!

Oh and I'm sure all the millions of visitors from other countries have stopped to consult you upon their visit so they can gain some valuable advice and solidify your conclusions that they dont compare their country to other countries or make personal comments, when they travel...obviously the travel bug hasnt hit someone.
 
Old 12-12-2011, 11:25 AM
 
3,062 posts, read 4,059,404 times
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So would this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
...Just because you have some personal issue against a certain perspective doesnt mean my perspective is representative of 300 over million people!...

negate this then?

Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
... In other words, most Americans do not even think about Canada so it is more the reverse that you say- that Canadians are far far more likely to compare their country to the US (for various reasons you are well aware of) than the other way around...
 
Old 12-12-2011, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Canada
3,095 posts, read 2,590,442 times
Reputation: 4914
Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
Honestly when one group hardly thinks of the other, then there is not even a springboard towards a "comparison". In other words, most Americans do not even think about Canada so it is more the reverse that you say- that Canadians are far far more likely to compare their country to the US (for various reasons you are well aware of) than the other way around.

Just because you have some personal issue against a certain perspective doesnt mean my perspective is representative of 300 over million people!

Oh and I'm sure all the millions of visitors from other countries have stopped to consult you upon their visit so they can gain some valuable advice and solidify your conclusions that they dont compare their country to other countries or make personal comments, when they travel...obviously the travel bug hasnt hit someone.
I think Zoisite's point was not about 300 million Americans outside of Canada thinking about Canada but Americans visiting Canada and in the process of visiting, comparing Canada to the US.

But, while the boorish-American-making-rude-comments-when-visiting-Canada has obtained mythical status in Canada, I don't actually know anyone who has personally met this mythical American.

I have met plenty boorish German tourists here though

Back to the OP - I don't know if Canadians are reserved. I think if you're reserved, you don't really think of yourself that way or any way but it is a label put on you by others. I think maybe the 'reserved Canadian' is another mythology we've embraced about ourselves. Others might have said it first, and then we decided it was a nice counterpoint to the 'boorish American,' and embraced it.

Last edited by netwit; 12-12-2011 at 11:40 AM.. Reason: typo
 
Old 12-12-2011, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Urban Coastal California
1,422 posts, read 2,419,711 times
Reputation: 1099
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunshineleith View Post
So would this:




negate this then?



No because unlike other Americans, I do think about Canada and thus make comparisons between countries..but I am an exception as to an American who thinks about Canada (but it's b/c I have spent ample time there)
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