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Old 02-23-2012, 03:20 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,241 posts, read 6,581,911 times
Reputation: 14207

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MexiQuebecois View Post
I met a guy that was on welfare and he still had an income that paid him cash, so he just kept leeching from the government for 16 years, SIXTEEN YEARS, now that's just messed up in my opinion.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucknow View Post
It's also kinda messed up that no one ever reported him.
MQ never said if that person was a Canadian or a citizen of another country. I don't know what the welfare policies are in other countries but in Canada there are very strict policies about being on welfare. There is a time limit for how long people can be on welfare and even single parents are subject to that time limit - usually 5 years maximum for single parents. For a single, able-bodied person with no dependents it's 1 year and they have to be taking career training during that year or be able to provide documentation that proves that they are searching for a job EVERY day. If they're not taking career training or can't provide proof that they're job searching they'll get booted off welfare after 3 months.

If the person MQ met was a Canadian he might have been somebody that was getting a disability pension which is not the same thing as welfare and it's not at all easy to get a disability pension, there has to be something really wrong with their health. People on disability pensions are allowed to supplement their pension income up to a certain amount but they are required to declare it.

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Last edited by Zoisite; 02-23-2012 at 03:32 PM..
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Old 02-23-2012, 06:57 PM
 
1,269 posts, read 3,417,020 times
Reputation: 797
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
MQ never said if that person was a Canadian or a citizen of another country. I don't know what the welfare policies are in other countries but in Canada there are very strict policies about being on welfare. There is a time limit for how long people can be on welfare and even single parents are subject to that time limit - usually 5 years maximum for single parents. For a single, able-bodied person with no dependents it's 1 year and they have to be taking career training during that year or be able to provide documentation that proves that they are searching for a job EVERY day. If they're not taking career training or can't provide proof that they're job searching they'll get booted off welfare after 3 months.

If the person MQ met was a Canadian he might have been somebody that was getting a disability pension which is not the same thing as welfare and it's not at all easy to get a disability pension, there has to be something really wrong with their health. People on disability pensions are allowed to supplement their pension income up to a certain amount but they are required to declare it.

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Thanks Zoisite, for explaining it so well. Let's get back to "Universal Child Care Benefit" (UCCB). Per this table HERE, there is an income threshold.

Does it mean that so long as the parents' annual NET income falls below $146k or $109k, they can receive UCCB?

Can they turn down the checks, if they feel that their kids do not need them?
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:00 AM
 
12,886 posts, read 15,432,494 times
Reputation: 14853
Quote:
Originally Posted by nur afgriyanti View Post
Dear All,
I am Indonesian married to Canadian (Quebec Provence)and we have a Canadian child. We are now living in Indonesia. As my son is entering his school this year, i am wondering to get the child benefit. But the fact is my husband is working as a musician in a cruise ship and never pay any single tax in his life. Do we eligible get our child tax benefit. If we are, how?! thanks
Nothing personal....but if you want Canada to give you benefits, maybe you should move back to Canada.
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Old 02-26-2012, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,024 posts, read 10,568,089 times
Reputation: 8908
Quote:
Originally Posted by dougie86 View Post
Thanks Zoisite, for explaining it so well. Let's get back to "Universal Child Care Benefit" (UCCB). Per this table HERE, there is an income threshold.

Does it mean that so long as the parents' annual NET income falls below $146k or $109k, they can receive UCCB?

Can they turn down the checks, if they feel that their kids do not need them?
The child tax credit and the UCCB are completely different things.
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Old 02-29-2012, 09:51 AM
 
2,289 posts, read 3,934,133 times
Reputation: 2055
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucknow View Post
The child tax credit and the UCCB are completely different things.
lol, that's what happens when so many programs are tacked onto each other, but the link provided by the OP had nothing to do with what is commonly referred to as "child tax credit" either.

Here's what we have at the federal level:

UCCB: Universal Child Care Benefit = 100$/month/child regardless of income. However it's taxable so the net benefit does depend on your income.

CCTB: Canada Child Tax Benefit (which OP talked about) = based on number of kids (and whether they're disabled) and income. The use of the word "tax" in the name of this program is misleading: the only relation with taxes is that the amount you get depends on family income (excluding UCCB). It is non-taxable. Assuming your kids aren't disabled the amount can be as high as ~275$/month/child if family income is $25,000. It decreases quickly and reaches 0$ around $120,000 family income. Here (http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/icbc/simnet/SimnController - broken link) is a CCTB calculator on the CRA website.

What is commonly referred to as "child tax credit" is the non-refundable tax credit on line 367 (schedule 1) of the income tax return, called Amount for children born in 1994 or later = $2,131 x 15% = $320/child that's taken off your payable taxes.

Add everything the provinces have and it can be pretty confusing.
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