U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 01-29-2013, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
9,522 posts, read 9,402,418 times
Reputation: 6675

Advertisements

Where are you most likely to be offered something to eat or drink while visiting - an "Anglo" Canadian's home or a "French" Canadian's home?

 
Old 01-29-2013, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Where are you most likely to be offered something to eat or drink while visiting - an "Anglo" Canadian's home or a "French" Canadian's home?
I would think that people would offer their guests something to drink pretty much anywhere in the world...

One thing I can tell you in Quebec is even among really close friends or family who come over for dinner it's pretty much unthinkable to arrive without at least a bottle of wine. (This might not be just a Quebec thing though - not sure.)
 
Old 01-29-2013, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,500 posts, read 1,350,579 times
Reputation: 1723
I always offer guests something to drink at least, sometimes I offer food as well if we are about to eat ourselves. I always bring wine as well when invited to someone's home, it's just the way I was raised, never show up without a little something to give the host.
 
Old 01-29-2013, 04:57 PM
 
10,357 posts, read 7,974,037 times
Reputation: 4547
This author describes Canadians pretty well"

"When speaking to a Canadian, keep an arm's length distance from the person. Maintaining personal space is important to Canadians.
Unlike Australians and Americans, Canadians do not give a lot of eye contact to people who are speaking with them. Why? It probably has something to do with our mania for politeness.
No backslapping, shouting or calling attention to oneself is acceptable. Canadians tend to embarrass easily, so while Canadians are generally casual, they are not loud. On that note, Canadians do not generally express themselves with their hands. Moreover, touching, patting or hugging other men in public is considered socially unacceptable. "

Furthermore:
"It’s often been said about Canadians that while they are polite, they are not a friendly people compared, that is, to their American cousins. Canadians pride themselves on their tolerance and of being non-judgmental, which means that Canadians often times prefer not to express opinions on various subjects for fear of offending, which, to many Canadians, is seen as a faux pas. Do not expect a passionate debate on any issue from a Canadian. It’s just not in the national DNA."


http://www.executiveplanet.com/index...blic_Behaviour
 
Old 01-29-2013, 06:08 PM
 
558 posts, read 547,266 times
Reputation: 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
I suppose it depends what your parameters for 'diverse' is. Does the United States have a state that predominately speaks a different language? Okay we might soon if Puerto Rico joins, but Puerto Rico will never be as huge a part of America as Quebec is of Canada. Canada started in Quebec.
Diverse by ethnic background and race. Spanish is the 2nd most spoken language in America because of the hispanic population in California, Texas and Florida. Also keep in mind the US doesn't have an official language.
 
Old 01-29-2013, 06:54 PM
 
558 posts, read 547,266 times
Reputation: 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by kemvp6 View Post
racially is obviously the states...how so ethnically though?
It's not that easy to gauge, but up until the 1960s Canada was mostly made up of English and French, while the US has always had immigrants from more ethnic backgrounds. And the US continues to receive the most immigrants in the world every year Another thing to note is that Canada has a tiny Latin America population, while the US has more ethnic groups from Latin America.
 
Old 01-29-2013, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,164 posts, read 1,749,261 times
Reputation: 2624
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellemint View Post
Moreover, touching, patting or hugging other men in public is considered socially unacceptable.
I can agree with this. I don't typically greet my friends that way, and I don't know any male who does. The exception is very, very close friends--a buddy on the other side of the country, and whom I've known for over twenty years (thinking about it, nearly thirty!), and with whom I stay in touch: yes, on the once or twice a year occasions when we can cross paths, he gets a hug and a "how are you, you old @#$%?" (And he will typically respond with "@#$% you, you @#$%!" Then we both laugh.) But the guy at the local sports bar whom I can name but I only see once a week for Sunday NFL games? A handshake, if that. More often, a pat on the shoulder when I walk in and a "How are the [team name] doing today?"

Quote:
Furthermore:
"It’s often been said about Canadians that while they are polite, they are not a friendly people compared, that is, to their American cousins. Canadians pride themselves on their tolerance and of being non-judgmental, which means that Canadians often times prefer not to express opinions on various subjects for fear of offending, which, to many Canadians, is seen as a faux pas. Do not expect a passionate debate on any issue from a Canadian. It’s just not in the national DNA."
Another good point, but I would put a finer point on it. Canadians can and do engage in informal passionate debates on a number of topics, but typically do so only if they know the person with whom they are debating. Example: An old friend and I were at opposite ends of the political spectrum, and often debated each other. It was fun--in the spirit of friendship, we each had to cede points to each other, but in the end, we remained friends. But if we were overheard by a stranger (say, we were at the local bar) who wanted in to our conversation, and we had no idea who this person was, we'd shut up and talk about something neutral: the hockey game, the weather, etc. Our debate waited until the other person went away, then continued.

I guess, in short, if you want to debate issues with a Canadian, you have to get to know him or her first.
 
Old 01-30-2013, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,698 posts, read 8,485,551 times
Reputation: 4877
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Another good point, but I would put a finer point on it. Canadians can and do engage in informal passionate debates on a number of topics, but typically do so only if they know the person with whom they are debating. Example: An old friend and I were at opposite ends of the political spectrum, and often debated each other. It was fun--in the spirit of friendship, we each had to cede points to each other, but in the end, we remained friends. But if we were overheard by a stranger (say, we were at the local bar) who wanted in to our conversation, and we had no idea who this person was, we'd shut up and talk about something neutral: the hockey game, the weather, etc. Our debate waited until the other person went away, then continued.

I guess, in short, if you want to debate issues with a Canadian, you have to get to know him or her first.
Agreed, that point was bothering me a bit and I feel like you clarified it rather well. Many Canadians do love to engage in a good intellectual debate with each other, but we have to feel familiar and safe with the person we're debating with, otherwise we get uncomfortable with the situation. I think you hit on it when you said the debate was friendly and you're still friends at the end of it. We don't want debate to be acrimonious or to be making enemies.
 
Old 01-30-2013, 12:54 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,164 posts, read 1,749,261 times
Reputation: 2624
Quote:
Originally Posted by drknoble View Post
It's not that easy to gauge, but up until the 1960s Canada was mostly made up of English and French....
I'd put a finer point on that, and say that our population was made up mostly of English and French speakers, though not necessarily of British subjects and French citizens. (In fact, I'd guess that especially in the wake of the Confederation centennial celebration in 1967, most people in Canada referred to themselves not as "British subjects," but rather "Canadian citizens," which they had been since the 1940s.) By the 1960s, we weren't attracting many people from the UK and France, comparatively speaking; though many immigrants knew either the English or French languages. Jamaica, the Barbados, and India would be good examples of sources of non-UK English speakers, while Haiti, Senegal, and Morocco would be good examples of not-from-France French speakers.

Still, WWII had a big effect on immigration; and if I recall correctly, we got our share of people from places where neither English nor French were neither the native languages nor widely spoken. When I was a child at public schools in Toronto in the 60s and 70s, my classmates included kids whose parents were from Greece, from Hungary, from Germany, from Spain, from Italy, from Japan, from Hong Kong (well, maybe there was English there, in those days, but most of my Hong Kong classmates spoke Cantonese as a first language), from Pakistan, from Holland, and from the Soviet Union, among many others. In short, it would be a mistake to claim that Canadian immigration, post-WWII, consisted only of people from the UK and France.

Heck, the experiences of the parents of my classmates demonstrated that. Example: a Jewish classmate's mother bore the Nazi concentration camp tattoo that she got at Auschwitz--she always showed it to us kids so "you know what the Nazis did to people like your classmate Howie, and you will make sure that it will never happen again." Trust me, Mrs. Weinberg, if I have anything to say about it, it won't!

Quote:
Another thing to note is that Canada has a tiny Latin America population, while the US has more ethnic groups from Latin America.
I'm not sure how or why this matters. It is true, in my experience, I've only personally known about five Latin Americans who have come to Canada (from El Salvador, Costa Rica, Chile, Panama, and Brazil), though I'm sure that we have welcomed many other from Latin America. But I do know that we tend to attract Spanish-speakers from outside the Americas. An ex-girlfriend who came from Spain, for example, and her immediate family, and her extended family, and all their friends and relatives, and so on and so on. All from Spain, and all happy here in Canada.

If you want to hear the Spanish language in Canada, you can; but it will not the Spanish of Latin America--it will be the Spanish of Spain. Heck, my Spanish ex-girlfriend used to buy the daily "El Pais" newspaper (out of Madrid, Spain) in Toronto; but to the best of my knowledge, you cannot buy a Latin American daily paper in Canada.

Still, I would suggest that Canada's dearth of Latinos is more than made up for by our influx of Indians, Pakistanis, Chinese, Sri Lankans, Vietnamese, South Africans, Zimbabweans, Cambodians, Laotians, Iranians, Iraquis, Ethopians, Jordanians, Angolans, Russians, Egyptians, Nigerians, and people from so many other places.

Some still come from the UK and France, I'll admit.

Oh, and the US. Yes, some Americans come here too.
 
Old 01-30-2013, 04:11 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellemint View Post
This author describes Canadians pretty well"

"When speaking to a Canadian, keep an arm's length distance from the person. Maintaining personal space is important to Canadians.
Unlike Australians and Americans, Canadians do not give a lot of eye contact to people who are speaking with them. Why? It probably has something to do with our mania for politeness.
No backslapping, shouting or calling attention to oneself is acceptable. Canadians tend to embarrass easily, so while Canadians are generally casual, they are not loud. On that note, Canadians do not generally express themselves with their hands. Moreover, touching, patting or hugging other men in public is considered socially unacceptable. "
The person who wrote this has obviously never been around French Canadians, who certainly do express themselves with their hands.^

Plus men touching may be not that common but it is far from socially unacceptable. At least not from Toronto eastwards into Quebec.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top