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Old 03-04-2012, 05:37 AM
 
Location: CFL
903 posts, read 2,241,026 times
Reputation: 979

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Quote:
Originally Posted by poscstudent View Post
That still doesn't explain how someone can get from Ontario to the southern US quicker then its neighbouring province.
He didn't say from Ontario..
He said from Toronto.. Toronto to the northwestern border of Ontario is a very long drive.
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Old 03-04-2012, 07:47 AM
 
1,723 posts, read 5,139,804 times
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Also note that the vast majority of Ontario's population lives in Southern Ontario and could drive to Florida faster than Manitoba.
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Old 03-04-2012, 08:09 AM
 
233 posts, read 451,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tarp View Post
Well maybe you should learn how to read a map, or at least how to use Google Maps or Mapquest then. LOL.
Or maybe the poster should have been a bit more clear when they say "get to".
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Old 03-04-2012, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Ontario
329 posts, read 793,705 times
Reputation: 287
It is kind of unfortunate that it is easier for most Canadians to travel to the U.S. then it is to Canada. Mostly because most Canadians are closer to the U.S. than they are to other parts of Canada. It doesn't help that inter Canadian flights are very expensive as well. There are so many beautiful places in Canada but they are expensive to get to and so far away that sometimes a flight to Europe would be cheaper. It is a shame that many Canadians cannot see these amazing places in their own country.
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Old 03-04-2012, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Calgary, AB
482 posts, read 2,158,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gosling View Post
It is kind of unfortunate that it is easier for most Canadians to travel to the U.S. then it is to Canada. Mostly because most Canadians are closer to the U.S. than they are to other parts of Canada. It doesn't help that inter Canadian flights are very expensive as well. There are so many beautiful places in Canada but they are expensive to get to and so far away that sometimes a flight to Europe would be cheaper. It is a shame that many Canadians cannot see these amazing places in their own country.
This is a fact of living in Canada and IMHO is one of the things that holds this country back...

Folks generally stick to their region, not all but the majority. Most Ontarians have never been to the Maritimes or BC for instance. Many have been to Cuba but not Halifax for instance. There are many reason why... Canada is not a cheap country to travel in. Toronto/London is cheaper to fly than Toronto/Vancouver for instance. Hotels are much more expensive and book up faster in Canada than the US. The US is a bargain destination and is warmer than Canada. The Caribbean can be very cheap and Europe has the history.

As well, the TransCanada highway network is outmoded. Still two lanes from ON/MB border east to NB and also west of Lake Louise. The train network is skeletal as is the bus network.

A Ryanair or a Virgin Blue airline would do wonders for Canadian tourism and bring the country closer together.
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Old 03-04-2012, 09:13 PM
 
2,288 posts, read 3,932,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajau View Post
As well, the TransCanada highway network is outmoded. Still two lanes from ON/MB border east to NB and also west of Lake Louise. The train network is skeletal as is the bus network.
You can make the case that the car, train and bus networks are just the result of supply/demand mechanics -- why would we have a nice 4-lane highway from Vancouver to Sydney? Such a huge investment given the low population density. Or maybe that's a chicken vs. egg question -- does the network suck because Canadians don't like to move around the country, or do we stay in our region because it's such a hassle to move around?

But none of that explains the high cost of flying. Or maybe it does?
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Old 03-05-2012, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,024 posts, read 10,564,883 times
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Having travelled all around the USA and Canada for 5 straight years I made some observations. People seem to be on the move a lot more in the USA than in Canada. Even a very small town off the interstate has a lot of motels and they are usually busy. A lot of the plates will be from out of state. Travel plazas and truck stops are very busy with people coming and going. Because of all of this migrating around the facilities and services for those travelling in the USA are so far superior to Canada there is no comparison at all. Canada always uses the excuse of a small population and vast distances to excuse our poor roads and travelling amenities. I just don't buy it at all. There are equally vast spaces and low numbers in many places in the USA but the roads and rest areas, travel centres and other things are still really good. For example, Montana, Wyoming, ND, SD and many other low population states. I think Canada is just too cheap to build good roads and all the other infrastructure needed for excellent road travel. The TransCanada is our one and only "National Road", and it's a joke it's so poor and inadequate. In many places it's not as good a most American secondary regional roads and it does not mach up to almost any state highway. AS for the Interstate, the Trans Canada is not even in the same transportation universe!
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Old 03-05-2012, 03:00 PM
 
253 posts, read 598,123 times
Reputation: 280
Yeah, lucknow, I agree with you big time.

I find it weird that the USA can have multilane Interstates crisscrossing
all over the country, even in low populated states like Vermont, Wyoming, North Dakota and Canada can't even have 1 decent multilane highway from coast to coast.
Actually embarassingly bad at certain border points, for example Interstate 15 in Montana joins up with a very poor highway at the Alberta border (and that's in oil rich Alberta!!)
Interstate 89 in Vermont becomes a rough 2 laner just over the border in Quebec, same also for Interstate 95 at New Brunswick border.

Compared to US: Canada has One tenth the population (actually one 9th) , and about one tenth the GNP/GDP, but NOT one tenth the highway infrastructure, not even close.

Just what does the federal government do with all the tax dollars they take in?
Also keep in mind, Canada spends a fraction of what the US does on military, that "savings" certainly doesn't seem to be put into improving infrastructure.

However, the US is very lucky that the interstate highways were started under President Eisenhower in 1954 ,it took over 30 years to complete.
It cost many billions of dollars but just imagine what it would cost today.

President Kennedy made an audacious speach in 1961 about reaching the moon by the end of the decade.
Maybe prime minister Harper should make a bold declaration, "to construct a four lane highway across Canada by 2020
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Old 03-05-2012, 03:36 PM
 
18,265 posts, read 10,368,849 times
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All well and good but with our tax base being 1/9th, as you point out, how do we go about maintaining our committment to other things like our standing military that has been ignored for decades to wither on the vine, how about our committment to NATO and U.N. peacekeeping duties that have kept our forces busy over those same decades.
How about our committment to third world countries that have endured natural disasters like Haiti.
How about our much vaunted health care that is now at the cusp of needing vastly larger sums injected or a pareing back of benefits.
How about our committment to purchase new fighter jets and ships for our northern shores exposure?

Now; which of those other committments would you have our government sacrifice on the alter of gleaming asphault? I mean strictly in keeping with your ability to maintain your pride, choose your preference of what you wish to be proud of.
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Old 03-05-2012, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
1,132 posts, read 1,653,385 times
Reputation: 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by philobeddoe View Post
Yeah, lucknow, I agree with you big time.

I find it weird that the USA can have multilane Interstates crisscrossing
all over the country, even in low populated states like Vermont, Wyoming, North Dakota and Canada can't even have 1 decent multilane highway from coast to coast.
Actually embarassingly bad at certain border points, for example Interstate 15 in Montana joins up with a very poor highway at the Alberta border (and that's in oil rich Alberta!!)
Interstate 89 in Vermont becomes a rough 2 laner just over the border in Quebec, same also for Interstate 95 at New Brunswick border.

Compared to US: Canada has One tenth the population (actually one 9th) , and about one tenth the GNP/GDP, but NOT one tenth the highway infrastructure, not even close.

Just what does the federal government do with all the tax dollars they take in?
Also keep in mind, Canada spends a fraction of what the US does on military, that "savings" certainly doesn't seem to be put into improving infrastructure.

However, the US is very lucky that the interstate highways were started under President Eisenhower in 1954 ,it took over 30 years to complete.
It cost many billions of dollars but just imagine what it would cost today.

President Kennedy made an audacious speach in 1961 about reaching the moon by the end of the decade.
Maybe prime minister Harper should make a bold declaration, "to construct a four lane highway across Canada by 2020
Highways are a provincial responsibility, rather than federal, so your eye rolling at the thought of the Prime Minister making such a speech is more apt than you realized.

What's often not factored into the equation when comparing the difference between our highways systems, is, despite Canada's lack of highly maintained, major routes, there are a lot of paved highways, especially on the prairies.

I can speak personally, from growing up in Saskatchewan, that you can get to virtually any town south of Prince Albert on asphalt.

In fact, after doing a bit of digging, Saskatchewan's got about 21,000 km of paved highway (13,000 miles), which is more than Montana, North Dakota and Minnesota combined (source: Highway Statistics 2001 - NATIONAL HIGHWAY SYSTEM LENGTH - 2001 - Table HM-41). - Actually, if you count the supergrids (the overbuilt gravel roads that are labelled as provincial highways) there's something like 26,000 km of road labelled as highway in Saskatchewan.

That's where most of the highway budget goes.

As well, having driven the #1 back and forth across Alberta and Saskatchewan hundreds of times, I'd be inclined to argue that the infrastructure isn't there because the demand isn't there. Between Medicine Hat and Regina, traffic density rarely rises to more than a few cars/minute. It's already a long, empty piece of road. Making it four lanes would just make it long, empty and more expensive.
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